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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 07 Apr 2011 (Thursday) 22:37
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center AF vs 9-point AF

 
ekinnyc
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Apr 07, 2011 22:37 |  #1

the T2i has 9-point AF, however, i keep mine on center point AF always. this way, i can pick what i want to focus on, and recompose as necessary.

am i giving anything up by using center point AF 100% of the time?


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krb
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Apr 07, 2011 22:39 |  #2

ekinnyc wrote in post #12180682 (external link)
am i giving anything up by using center point AF 100% of the time?

Nope. You're doing it right.


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SiriS
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Apr 08, 2011 04:39 |  #3

ekinnyc wrote in post #12180682 (external link)
the T2i has 9-point AF, however, i keep mine on center point AF always. this way, i can pick what i want to focus on, and recompose as necessary.

am i giving anything up by using center point AF 100% of the time?

I use your method 95% of the time. The other 5% is when I'm using extremely thin DOF (e.g. 50mm at f1.8) where recomposing often throws my focal plane off kilter. For me using the other AF points in situations like this helps focus and composition.


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Sp1207
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Apr 08, 2011 07:35 |  #4

You're giving up a bit of accuracy compared to using an outer focus point.

I would never give the camera control, but I regularly switch focus point when using F2.8 and faster lenses, especially for print work.


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SkipD
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Apr 08, 2011 07:59 |  #5

ekinnyc wrote in post #12180682 (external link)
the T2i has 9-point AF, however, i keep mine on center point AF always. this way, i can pick what i want to focus on, and recompose as necessary.

am i giving anything up by using center point AF 100% of the time?

I have my 20D set to center-point-only all the time. However, I don't always use autofocus.

I have the autofocus actuation triggered by the * button (under my right thumb when holding the camera) so that pressing the shutter release button does nothing for focusing. Thus, I can choose to activate autofocus or not. Because I am using lenses with "full time manual focus", I can manually focus them simply by using the focus ring on the lens and NOT pressing the * button.


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wizard2340
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Apr 08, 2011 07:59 |  #6

If you are using a very narrow DOF you may not always get the item you want in focus after recomposing. When I first started using my Sigma 50 1.4 I would always center focus and recompose. I thought something was wrong with my lense when all my shots were OOF, but it figured out that the slight change in angle will make you object OOF. I still generally use center focus to get it in the range but then manually focus right before I shoot.


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ekinnyc
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Apr 08, 2011 09:04 |  #7

this is some good info right here. only one of my lenses supports FTM unfortunately. ill have to keep this in mind when shooting with my 30 1.4!!!


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tkerr
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Apr 08, 2011 09:21 |  #8

There are very few situations when I use the other AF Points. Otherwise I would use the center and recompose.
If you use any of the six AF points surrounding the center then you are essentially using the rule of thirds.
If I am shooting something that won't afford me the chance to recompose the shot I will use one of the others. For example:


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nepali
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Apr 08, 2011 11:16 |  #9

Center-point AF is the least used point on my 7D! :)



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krb
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Apr 08, 2011 11:25 |  #10

While all of the answers given in this thread are correct, I'm not sure how many of the respondents actually read the question in the title and first post.


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Sp1207
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Apr 08, 2011 11:39 |  #11

krb wrote in post #12183460 (external link)
While all of the answers given in this thread are correct, I'm not sure how many of the respondents actually read the question in the title and first post.

How so?

am i giving anything up by using center point AF 100% of the time?

You're giving up a bit of accuracy compared to using an outer focus point.


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tonylong
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Apr 08, 2011 13:14 |  #12

If you are asking about using all 9 points and letting the camera choose, that can be a headache because the camera can often choose the wrong point(s) for your composition, so I'd say the center point is better, yes, but as others have pointed out it can be better for some scenes to choose an outer point. So if you learn to switch single points and stay away from All points you could benefit. Sure, there are some scenarios where All points could be harmless, I just have never wanted to go that route.


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ekinnyc
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Apr 08, 2011 13:22 |  #13

what would be the benefit of using an outer point, other than in narrow DOF situations?


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tonylong
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Apr 08, 2011 13:25 |  #14

ekinnyc wrote in post #12184100 (external link)
what would be the benefit of using an outer point, other than in narrow DOF situations?

Like the portrait shown above, you can get the right framing for a subject and not have to bother with recomposing. I do it all the time. Of course, shooting with a narrow depth of field can make this mandatory, and I often shoot with a pretty narrow depth of field, but in general I like to keep my subjects properly framed and that's what the outer points are for.


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krb
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Apr 08, 2011 13:29 |  #15

Sp1207 wrote in post #12183526 (external link)
How so?

Is the title of this thread "center AF vs 9-point AF" or is it "center AF point vs off-center AF point"?


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center AF vs 9-point AF
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