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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 26 Apr 2011 (Tuesday) 12:12
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Aperture F STOP

 
N2bnfunn
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Apr 26, 2011 12:12 |  #1

How is the best way to find the right Aperture (F STOP) on the canon 5 d.

What I have been doing is to set the camera to P mode and see what aperture the camera finds and then from there go to manual mode and put in my shutter speed.

I was just wondering does anyone else have a better way? Thanks in advance for any ideas or help


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Sdiver2489
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Apr 26, 2011 12:18 |  #2

Experiment with the lenses you have until you get a general idea for how much you will have in focus at different focal lengths and different apertures. Then just take the shot.


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Andy ­ R
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Apr 26, 2011 12:20 |  #3

or use AV mode, you set the apeture yourself and the camera will auto put in the right shutter speed for a decent exposure


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ScullenCrossBones
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Apr 26, 2011 12:22 |  #4

http://www.amazon.com …TF8&qid=1303838​067&sr=1-1 (external link)

It depends on the situation. You need to understand exposure, even if the modern camera can make all the decisions for you. This book is a good place to start.

Aperture affects not only exposure, but also depth-of-field, that is it determines how much will be in focus in front of and behind the subject you have focused upon. It is only one if the variables that go into exposure. The other variables are light, shutter speed and iso.


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rral22
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Apr 26, 2011 12:40 as a reply to  @ ScullenCrossBones's post |  #5

The right f-stop is the one that gives you the depth of field you want for the picture you have in mind, and which allows you a shutter speed you need at the ISO you want to use.

That's why Av mode is so popular. You set the f-stop you want and then work on the rest. But the "right" aperture is whatever you decide it is as a photographer.




  
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Keyan
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Apr 26, 2011 14:16 |  #6

N2bnfunn wrote in post #12296194 (external link)
How is the best way to find the right Aperture (F STOP) on the canon 5 d.

What I have been doing is to set the camera to P mode and see what aperture the camera finds and then from there go to manual mode and put in my shutter speed.

I was just wondering does anyone else have a better way? Thanks in advance for any ideas or help

That will result in photos with uneven exposure - if it finds a shutter speed of 1/60 and an aperture of f/8, and then you go to manual mode and up the shutter speed to 1/250, but keep the same aperture, you are going to have a picture that is underexposed since the amount of light entering the camera has been reduced by over a factor of 4. The opposite is also true if you make the shutter time longer but keep the same aperture as it will let in too much light and overexpose your image. You should try out Tv mode if you are only concerned about shutter speed and want the camera to determine the aperture for you, or as others have said read Understanding Exposure and learn how aperture, ISO, and shutter speed all relate to exposure and the final image you get from the camera.


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gonzogolf
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Apr 26, 2011 14:18 |  #7

N2bnfunn wrote in post #12296194 (external link)
How is the best way to find the right Aperture (F STOP) on the canon 5 d.

What I have been doing is to set the camera to P mode and see what aperture the camera finds and then from there go to manual mode and put in my shutter speed.

I was just wondering does anyone else have a better way? Thanks in advance for any ideas or help

You need to pick up a copy of understand exposure by Bryan Peterson. It will explain why you would pick a particular variable, whether it is aperture, shutter speed, or ISO.

Edit: I didn't see that Scullencrossbones had already posted a link to it. Get the book.




  
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N2bnfunn
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Apr 28, 2011 11:39 as a reply to  @ gonzogolf's post |  #8

Thanks I just picked up a copy will read it and thanks again..


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RPCrowe
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Apr 28, 2011 12:08 as a reply to  @ N2bnfunn's post |  #9

Actually, you can also have total control of aperture and shutter speed using Programmed mode. You can increase/reduce shutter speed with the applicable changes in f/stop and you can reduce or increase exposure while still keeping total control of at which f/stop and shutter speed + ISO you are shooting.

However, changing the shutter speed and or f/stop while in the Programmed mode may be easier on a non-Rebel DSLR. The shutter speed, aperture and ISO and the exposure compensation used is visible at the bottom of my 7D viewfinder. My 7D viewfinder is big and bright, even bigger and brighter than my 40D. It is a joy to work with this control system and to have all the adjustments at my finger tips.

I adjust the f/stop with my forefinger on the Main Dial and the shutter speed with my thumb on the Quick Control Dial. Pressing the ISO/Flash exposure compensation button allows me to adjust the ISO using my forefinger on the Main Dial. I do all of this without having to take my eye from the viewfinder. ..

I have not used a Rebel since the 350D (Rebel XT) but, I remember that camera adjustments were quite a bit more involved and I needed to use the menu for several controls. Perhaps the newer Rebels have solved this problem but, I do not believe that they have the Quick Control Dial which is a great boon to camera adjustment...

The time that I will definitely use AV mode is when I am shooting auto exposure bracketing (AEB) for incorporation into a HDR composite. I would not want the f/stop to change in this instance since the focus could change along with the aperture change. BTW, I often use AEB in conjunction with Exposure Compensation for additional control...

When I shoot for panoramas, I always shoot manual because I don't want my exposure to change from one side of the pano to the other. I adjust my aperture/shutter speeds using the Main Dial and the Quick Control Dial for the midway values...

Another adjustment concept I love on my 7D which, I also had on my 40D, are the three user selected modes. I can select various shooting parameters such as ISO, focus, burst, exposure metering etc. and register these to one of the three user selected modes. I can then select that entire group of shooting parameters by simply twisting the mode dial to the appropriate User Selected Mode, C1, C2, C3. This will set the parameters of the camera in one quick move of the dial instead of having to select the parameters individually...

The User Selected Modes camera control is very important to me and I was disappointed to see that Canon dummied down the 60D control system by reducing the user selected modes to a single one while retaining the dummy settings such as landscape, portrait, etc. That is truly a step towards "Super-Rebel" status rather than an evolution of the acclaimed x0D line of cameras.


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tonylong
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Apr 28, 2011 15:40 |  #10

N2bnfunn wrote in post #12296194 (external link)
How is the best way to find the right Aperture (F STOP) on the canon 5 d.

What I have been doing is to set the camera to P mode and see what aperture the camera finds and then from there go to manual mode and put in my shutter speed.

I was just wondering does anyone else have a better way? Thanks in advance for any ideas or help

Let's clear this up -- what exactly model are you using? You typed the 5 d -- is this the 5D Classic, the 5D2, or was it a typo? It will make a difference in how you hadle various controls.

I'm asking because I assume it is your first DSLR?

Anyway, aside from Understanding Exposure there is a nice quick read here in POTN:

https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=414088


Tony
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Aperture F STOP
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