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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 04 May 2011 (Wednesday) 00:13
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Canon 60D Lense Recommendations

 
CHillyDoggy
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May 04, 2011 00:13 |  #1

Can anyone recommend a good lens for portraits for my 60D? My buddy suggests a 50mm of some kind, anyone know of a good one of those or have any other suggestions?

Thanks,

Craig


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Sdiver2489
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May 04, 2011 00:34 |  #2

need a budget


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raksphoto
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May 04, 2011 00:39 |  #3

The 100mm f/2 will work well for portraits. If you have the cash, a 135mm f/2L will be a bit better, if you also can work at a longer working distance for the view.

On a 60D, the 50mm works effectively as 80mm. IMHO, this is not quite telephoto enough for perspective compression. I feel similarly about an 85mm focal length. I had the 85mm f/1.2L for a long time, which I used on a 20D ... it was not "strong enough" for portrait work, insofar as I would need to be too close to the model to get a non-distorted view of her/him. So, a prime of 100mm or larger.

As an alternative, for more compositional freedom, you could use instead of a prime a 70-200mm or 70-300mm zoom, if you can afford the light (cheaper zoom) or the faster lens (professional zoom).


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blk-dslr
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May 04, 2011 01:04 |  #4

prolly 85L


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k3v11n
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May 04, 2011 01:15 |  #5

What's your budget and what lenses do you have so far?

On tight budget - 85mm 1.8

No budget - 85L


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EthanFrank
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May 04, 2011 01:45 |  #6

I've been really liking 50mm on a crop sensor for portraits. I tried out the Sigma 50mm f1.4 the other day and loved it.


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-ethan

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Leftimage
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May 04, 2011 03:17 |  #7

In my experiences so far, the Tamron 17-50 2.8 is a great start for normal zooms. (I'm assuming you'll prefer budget-conscious lenses in the early going) I also can't see any downside to getting the 50mm 1.8 II.
If you're new to photography I think these two lenses are a great way of learning the ropes (why we value larger apertures, what ranges we like and need) while still getting highly respectable shots. (and keeping it under 500$ total)
But if there's no rush really get the nifty fifty to start and see how you like it. (you'll like it)


Canon 60D/ Canon 85mm 1.8/ Tamron 17-50mm 2.8 VC/ Canon 135mm 2.8 SoftFocus/ Canon 50mm 1.8 II/ Manfrotto 7301YB
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rodleviton
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May 04, 2011 03:46 |  #8

85 and 100 may be too long for portraits on a crop camera unless you want distance between you and your subject.

If you can, go down to a shop and test a 50mm and an 85mm to see what you are comfortable with.

I would also recommend the 50 f1.8 on your camera(crop) to start with as it's cheap and very sharp.


Gear: Canon EOS 500D/Rebel T1i/Kiss X3 (external link) - Gripped | Canon S95 | Canon EF 24-70L | Canon EF 70-300L| Sigma 30 f1.4 | 18-55mm IS | Tamron 18-270/10-24/17-35 | EF 50 f1.8 II | Tokina 100 Macro | Speedlite 270EX | Helios 85 f1.5 | Jupiter 9 85 F2 | Helios M44-4 58 f2 | Jupiter 135 f3.5 | Mir 1V 37 f2.8 | Industar 61 50 MC f2.5 | Industar 50 F3.5 | Pentacon 30 f3.5 | TAIR 11A 135 f2.8 |
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jrscls
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May 04, 2011 05:32 |  #9

Canon 60mm f2.8 macro makes a very nice portrait lens and gives you a nice closeup lens as well.


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Ebwly
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May 04, 2011 05:38 |  #10

rodleviton wrote in post #12344357 (external link)
85 and 100 may be too long for portraits on a crop camera unless you want distance between you and your subject.

If you can, go down to a shop and test a 50mm and an 85mm to see what you are comfortable with.

I would also recommend the 50 f1.8 on your camera(crop) to start with as it's cheap and very sharp.

Thats true, on a cropped sensor you will experience some trouble. Consider the 50mm f1.4, it is worth the extra price as it is far better than the f1.8 one, i've see all sorts of problems happen to the cheaper one, unable to take it off the camera, stuck, fell apart when dropped etc, lack of Full Time manual focus etc.

On the other hand, the 1500 plus f1.2 isn't that much better for such a massive jump in price...the 50mm f1.4 will be perfect for you.

As for a general purpose lens, the 17-55 f2.8 is the ideal choice, don't go for the 24-70 or the 18-55, both have drawbacks, in the case of the former, you lack a wide angle, (remember the 24mm is more like 35mm on cropped) and on the latter, you dont get f2.8 for low light shots. Trust me, the 17-55's resale value will stay strong for ages assuming you take good care of it.

my 0.02


7D, 17-55 f2.8 IS, 70-200 f2.8 IS II, 50 f1.4

  
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SkipD
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May 04, 2011 05:52 |  #11

raksphoto wrote in post #12343900 (external link)
On a 60D, the 50mm works effectively as 80mm.

For the newbies - this statement is extremely misleading.

What the writer actually means is: A 50 mm lens on a 60D provides the same field (angle) of view as an 80 mm lens on a 35 mm film format camera such as a 5D.


raksphoto wrote in post #12343900 (external link)
IMHO, this is not quite telephoto enough for perspective compression.

Again for the newbies - a lens' focal length has absolutely nothing to do with perspective in images. Perspective is controlled purely by changing the distance between the camera and various elements of the scene in front of it. For an in-depth discussion of perspective control, please read our "sticky" (now found in the General Photography Talk forum) tutorial titled Perspective Control in Images - Focal Length or Distance?.

In order to produce portraits with a pleasing perspective (relative sizes of various elements in the scene such as nose vs ears), it is typically recommended that the photographer keep the camera at least from six to ten feet from the portrait subject. The focal length of the lens used should be chosen to properly frame the subject at that distance.

For typical waist-up portraits, the most-often recommended focal length for an APS-C camera would be 50 to 60 mm.


Skip Douglas
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..... but still learning all the time.

  
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Silverfox1
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May 04, 2011 07:19 |  #12

CHillyDoggy wrote in post #12343828 (external link)
Can anyone recommend a good lens for portraits for my 60D? My buddy suggests a 50mm of some kind, anyone know of a good one of those or have any other suggestions?

Thanks,

Craig

Be nice to know what you presently own & your max budget ?


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Dexinthecity
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May 04, 2011 07:21 |  #13

my Siggy 30mm f1.4 comes in today!! wooo


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Cham_001
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May 04, 2011 07:24 |  #14

CHillyDoggy wrote in post #12343828 (external link)
Can anyone recommend a good lens for portraits for my 60D? My buddy suggests a 50mm of some kind, anyone know of a good one of those or have any other suggestions?

Thanks,

Craig

I think as a starter lens try the EF-S 50mm F1.8mm II lens - i am using this on a 40D. remember, with a magnification of 1.6 this becomes an 80mm lens.

;)


"... with a clear perspective - the confusion is clearer ..."
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coaspak
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May 04, 2011 07:40 |  #15

I often use a 24-105 f4L for portraits but have used a 100 f2.8 as well. I think the suggestions given for 85 f1.8 are also worth considering. Your budget will determine the L factor. I don't think 50 mm is the right choice for portraits.


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Canon 60D Lense Recommendations
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