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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 21 May 2011 (Saturday) 01:32
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When to use IS feature on lens?

 
arch.cm
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May 21, 2011 01:32 |  #1

I was seeing that the IS feature is only good for still objects... basically it helps in case I shake the camera, etc. But, it won't help with moving objects such as wildlife, right? In this case do I have to turn it off? Or is the only case where I have to turn it off when I put my camera on a tripod? I'm just a bit confused... :confused:


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Sdiver2489
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May 21, 2011 02:50 |  #2

It's not going to hurt anything for normal shots if you leave it on. People say to turn it off on a tripod but lots of IS lenses detect when they are on a tripod and turn themselves off. I've done comparisons for myself of on vs. off and they are most often identical.


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Sirrith
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May 21, 2011 02:53 |  #3

some say to turn it off when using high shutter speeds, I dont really bother. It can help conserve battery if you do turn it off though.


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May 21, 2011 02:57 as a reply to  @ Sdiver2489's post |  #4

Depends on the lens/version of IS. With my EF300 f/4 IS(old IS), i have to turn it off on the tripod.. it just blurs the pic on some of the shots. With the newer implementations, i leave it on. As for regular shots, i leave it on all the time.. doesn't seem to hurt.


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Damadsetta
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May 21, 2011 03:01 |  #5

Leaving the IS on slows focus speed, so best to turn it off for wildlife, sports etc.




  
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Sdiver2489
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May 21, 2011 03:05 |  #6

Damadsetta wrote in post #12451135 (external link)
Leaving the IS on slows focus speed, so best to turn it off for wildlife, sports etc.

Uh...never seen or heard this


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Damadsetta
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May 21, 2011 03:12 |  #7

Pretty common knowledge. I definitely turn it off for sports and itnhas a noticeable effect, although I shoot mostly volleyball and need the focus to be super fast.

https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1035140




  
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MOkoFOko
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May 21, 2011 03:27 |  #8

Damadsetta wrote in post #12451154 (external link)
Pretty common knowledge. I definitely turn it off for sports and itnhas a noticeable effect, although I shoot mostly volleyball and need the focus to be super fast.

https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1035140

Depends on the model of course. Some lenses with IS engaged will still focus faster than other specific models without it. I'd say it depends whether the deviation in focus time is worth it. My 70200II is fast enough in focusing with IS engaged. Even with a fair amount of light in the daytime for birding, I still keep it on anytime I'm handholding. Higher keeper rate. On the tripod, it's off--very, very annoying.


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Katalyst
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May 21, 2011 04:30 |  #9

I don't get this whole 'get rid of the IS while shooting anything fast' issue, I think it's wonderful to have IS to nail the framing of the shot! And let's not forget about panning shots, IS is certainly a useful tool when doing that!




  
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Sirrith
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May 21, 2011 05:40 |  #10

Damadsetta wrote in post #12451154 (external link)
Pretty common knowledge.

Not really, I've never seen it mentioned on these forums before!
Might be true, but its not common knowledge as far as I'm concerned :)


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May 21, 2011 06:01 |  #11

never switch it on unless i'm shooting hand held still objects or land/cityscapes & the shutter speed drops low.


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philwillmedia
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May 21, 2011 06:33 |  #12

Damadsetta wrote in post #12451135 (external link)
Leaving the IS on slows focus speed, so best to turn it off for wildlife, sports etc.

Sdiver2489 wrote in post #12451142 (external link)
Uh...never seen or heard this

Nope...neither have I.

Damadsetta wrote in post #12451154 (external link)
Pretty common knowledge. I definitely turn it off for sports and itnhas a noticeable effect, although I shoot mostly volleyball and need the focus to be super fast.

https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1035140

I wouldn't say it's pretty common knowledge that it slows focus speed - I doubt it has any major effect on focus aside from the millisecond that it takes for the IS to activate.

Katalyst wrote in post #12451266 (external link)
I don't get this whole 'get rid of the IS while shooting anything fast' issue,

I would suggest that's because you obviously don't understand how IS works, or what its primary object is.
The reason it's suggested that IS is turned off when shooting fast moving or erratically moving objects (race cars, football players etc) or objects is because it's not designed to, and is incapable of stopping movement in the subject.
It is designed to eliminate camera shake caused by the user.
Using higher shutter speeds for sports essentially negates the need for IS.

Katalyst wrote in post #12451266 (external link)
...I think it's wonderful to have IS to nail the framing of the shot!...

and just how does IS help to "nail the framing of the shot"?
IS can't possibly control how the photo is composed.

Katalyst wrote in post #12451266 (external link)
...And let's not forget about panning shots, IS is certainly a useful tool when doing that!...

Not necessarily.
Good panning technique is going to help far more than IS.
Later lenses with the two modes of IS may assist when in Mode 2, but almost all the photographers I regularly shoot with IS lense with actually have IS off, and some, myself included (with the 100-400L), actually have them taped so that the switch doesn't get turned on.
My 300/2.8 and 70-200/2.8 are both non IS models. Deliberately purchased because I don't use IS and didn't see the need to pay for a feature I don't use.
I shoot a fair bit of motorsport and don't seem to do too badly with no IS and frequently pan at shutterspeeds as slow as 1/5sec.

The reason being is as I mentioned above - when using high shutter speeds, IS has no effect (or at best, little effect) because the (usually) faster shutter speeds effectively negate the need for image stabilisation - you are not likely to get camera shake.


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Sirrith
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May 21, 2011 06:40 |  #13

philwillmedia wrote in post #12451456 (external link)
and just how does IS help to "nail the framing of the shot"?
IS can't possibly control how the photo is composed.


I find it does, because when IS is on the frame just stops moving around as much, especially with long lenses, which helps you control composition better.


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Katalyst
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May 21, 2011 07:00 |  #14

I know how IS works just fine, and if I use it where other people don't... Does that make me use it the wrong way, or just different? Anyway, I've recently panned some motorsports and I was happy to have IS Mode 2 on it when the shutterspeed were between 1/30 and 1/50... In my opinion, there is no arguing that IS is helpful!

Sirrith wrote in post #12451465 (external link)
I find it does, because when IS is on the frame just stops moving around as much, especially with long lenses, which helps you control composition better.

Exactly, my dad does Triathlon's and IS helps me to get the framing just right by providing a more calm and stable peek through the viewfinder!




  
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LeeRatters
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May 21, 2011 07:04 |  #15

Sirrith wrote in post #12451465 (external link)
I find it does, because when IS is on the frame just stops moving around as much, especially with long lenses, which helps you control composition better.

in that case IS will stop any camera shake. it won't/can't help composition.

philwillmedia wrote in post #12451456 (external link)
Nope...neither have I.


My 300/2.8 and 70-200/2.8 are both non IS models. Deliberately purchased because I don't use IS and didn't see the need to pay for a feature I don't use.
I shoot a fair bit of motorsport and don't seem to do too badly with no IS and frequently pan at shutterspeeds as slow as 1/5sec.

i'm thinking about a 70-200 & i would go for the 2.8 over the 4/IS because of the subjects i'd shoot as you've said there ^^


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When to use IS feature on lens?
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