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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre People Talk 
Thread started 03 Jun 2011 (Friday) 19:47
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Senior Pictures

 
Bclaf
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Jun 03, 2011 19:47 |  #1

Hello, One of my friends asked me if I would take her senior pictures because she liked all my other pictures.. Without thinking I said yes. I came to realize, I haven't really taken that many people pictures, the only ones being candid/sports.. I don't have a flash, only the pop-up, and I'll probably be using the 50mm 1.8 or 85mm 1.8., I know some of the basics, like shoot away from the sun, and during the evening.
How helpful is the flash really?

Are there any tips y'all recommend, or a decent flash with budget in mind I should get (I planned on getting one prior to this, have been looking at the 430EX and some sigma ones..)

btw: I'll be shooting outside, not indoors.
Thanks,
Brandon


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http://www.flickr.com/​photos/bclaf (external link)
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bobbyz
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Jun 03, 2011 22:53 |  #2

Use the 85mm f1.8 and see if you can ask to bring some assistant to hold a reflector. I wouldn't use on camera flash. Look at senior thread in people forum for more ideas.


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Canon 24mm TSE-II, 85mm f1.2 L II, 90mm TSE-II Macro, 300mm f2.8 IS I

  
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Fizzler
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Jun 04, 2011 11:38 |  #3

I would use both the 85 and 50. Keep the subject out of direct sunlight and fill with a reflector. Get the white balance and exposure right in camera as much as possible a grey card is handy and focus on the eyes.

That is how I started out.. but than again I am still learning but aren't we all? :)


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Frugal
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Jun 04, 2011 21:46 as a reply to  @ Fizzler's post |  #4

A reflector will work fine in many locations, but you'll need to pick them and be there at the right time of day. You'll also need an assistant. A flash will give you more versatility if you're anticipating doing more senior portraits. Having it off camera is important. I use a stand and either use the flash in manual mode with rf602 triggers or in ETTL mode with an extended cable. ETTL for the flash and manual mode for the camera helps me zero in on the exposure and background/foreground balance more quickly than both manual.

If you're buying a flash I'd go for one that will do ETTL and full manual like the 430EX I or II

HTH


Richard
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kfreels
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Jul 08, 2011 10:14 as a reply to  @ Frugal's post |  #5

As others mentioned, I'm a big fan of reflectors. You can see how the light is actually falling, you have a much finer control than with flash, and they are dirt cheap by comparison. As a rule, I use strobes only when I need more light than is available, or when reflectors just can't be used. Order 3-4 various sizes of the reflectors with multiple colors (black, gold, silver, white) and gather together some of the student's friends for the shoot to hold them and explain that you want to "experiment". Also as others mentioned, keep your subject out of direct sunlight. Use the reflectors for highlights and fill. And try to shoot in the early morning or late afternoon.

If you ever watch a sports illustrated swimsuit shoot, you'll see lots of relfectors and often they start work before sunrise.


I am serious....and don't call me Shirley.
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bobbyz
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Jul 08, 2011 10:33 |  #6

kfreels wrote in post #12724750 (external link)
If you ever watch a sports illustrated swimsuit shoot, you'll see lots of relfectors and often they start work before sunrise.

yaa, those sun swatters are nice but most here won't spend that kind of money. regular reflectors are pain unless you got nice grip hardware to handle them or some assistants.


Fuji XT-1, 18-55mm
Sony A7rIV, , Tamron 28-200mm, Sigma 40mm f1.4 Art FE, Sony 85mm f1.8 FE, Sigma 105mm f1.4 Art FE
Fuji GFX50s, 23mm f4, 32-64mm, 45mm f2.8, 110mm f2, 120mm f4 macro
Canon 24mm TSE-II, 85mm f1.2 L II, 90mm TSE-II Macro, 300mm f2.8 IS I

  
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kfreels
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Jul 08, 2011 12:40 |  #7

bobbyz wrote in post #12724853 (external link)
yaa, those sun swatters are nice but most here won't spend that kind of money. regular reflectors are pain unless you got nice grip hardware to handle them or some assistants.

Yeah. That's what kids are for....and why I suggested gathering some of the student's friends. My teen daughters have become quite adept at handling reflectors. Teen daughters are much more expensive than a sun swatter, but much more versatile.


I am serious....and don't call me Shirley.
Canon 7D and a bunch of other stuff

  
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Benji
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Jul 10, 2011 19:41 |  #8

A reflector in the correct size and the proper type in the hands of someone who knows what he or she is doing can make an otherwise blah image into a work of art. Unfortunately too many internet "experts" suggest using a silver reflector "to bounce some of that beautiful noon time sunshine back into the face" which shows their utter stupidity and complete lack of photographic expertise. Another suggestion I read of from these same "experts" is using a gold reflector. Once a gold reflector is introduced it will cause all the light striking it to become a bright urine yellow while the rest of the subject and the background stay at the normal color temperature. Correcting the image's white balance becomes therefore impossible.

The reflector should be as large as what you are photographing. You cannot use a 2 x 2 reflector to bounce daylight back onto the full length subject. The reflector should NOT be held directly beside the subject thereby becoming an additional light source. When you can see a shadow on the cheek opposite the main light and then see light reflected from the reflector it was not held properly. It should be about 1/2 way in between the camera and the subject thereby wrapping the light around to the shadow side and not leaving a small strip of darker shadow in between. The reflector should be held high rather than low when used as a main light source so the catchlights will be located at the 11 or 1 o'clock positions in the eyes. Silver is best for daylight, white for weak late afternoon sunshine or dappled sunshine.

Benji




  
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