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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 07 Jun 2011 (Tuesday) 09:59
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design and shapes of lens hoods

 
0.0f
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Jun 07, 2011 09:59 |  #1

does anyone know what dictates the design of a lens hood?


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rick_reno
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Jun 07, 2011 10:37 |  #2

Maybe light, but I'm not sure.




  
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gonzogolf
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Jun 07, 2011 10:40 |  #3

The widest angle of view from the lens. If you are wondering why some are petal and some are round, its basically because the image is rectangular so that the field of view is wider on the sides than the top, allowing the top to protrude more without creeping into the image view. On longer lens the angle of view isnt wide so there is no reason not to make deeper hoods and round.




  
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artemisn
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Jun 07, 2011 10:40 |  #4

Wide angle lenses dictate wider petal shaped hoods because they cover a large angle and the lens hood shouldn't creep into the field-of-view (and vignette). Telephoto lenses require longer hoods because they cover a smaller angle, and sometimes (some of the 70-200s, I think?) are petal shaped. Petal shaped hoods are longer on top and shorter on the sides because the sensor is rectangular, and since the width is longer than the height, the top part of the hood can be longer without vignetting.

(I hope that was semi-coherent!)


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cacawcacaw
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Jun 07, 2011 11:18 as a reply to  @ artemisn's post |  #5

I was surprised to learn that my Sigma 85mm f/1.4 lens (external link) package included a lens hood extender, for use with crop sensor camera bodies.

The extender lengthens the lens hood by about an inch. This makes perfect sense because the crop sensor's field of view is narrower. The puzzling aspect is that I've never seen any other lens hoods that come with extenders. I'd assumed that lens hoods were made to exacting specifications and had never considered that the sensor size should be one of the major design considerations for lens hoods. Also, with the amount that Canon charges for their hoods, it just doesn't seem right for them to size them to full-frame bodies and then consider them "close enough" for crop sensor bodies.


Replacing my Canon 7D, Tokina 12-24mm, Canon 17-55mm, Sigma 30mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.4, and 150-500mm with a Panasonic Lumix FZ1000. I still have the 17-55 and the 30 available for sale.

  
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emrldwpn
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Jun 08, 2011 22:58 |  #6

The "flower petal" hoods are usually designed for lens that have non-rotating front elements. Lenses that have rotating front elements like the kit lens have circular hoods to prevent vignetting.




  
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cacawcacaw
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Jun 09, 2011 00:51 |  #7

It looks like the petals get smaller as the focal length increases and with the longer lenses the petals get so small that they just don't bother with them.

Here's a couple of sites that have templates for do-it-yourself lens hoods. This is the site for Canon lenses (external link) and this is the site for Canon lenses on crop sensor bodies (external link).

So how come lens hoods aren't adjustable for different focal lengths (as when used on a zoom lens) and why aren't they adjustable to suit crop sensor camera bodies (like my Sigma 85mm lens hood)? Is the exact size of the lens hood unimportant or is the importance of lens hoods oversold?


Replacing my Canon 7D, Tokina 12-24mm, Canon 17-55mm, Sigma 30mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.4, and 150-500mm with a Panasonic Lumix FZ1000. I still have the 17-55 and the 30 available for sale.

  
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Choderboy
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Jun 09, 2011 00:59 as a reply to  @ cacawcacaw's post |  #8

I think it's just a can of worms.

You would need 3 sets of hoods for each lens - or redesign existing hoods to be adjustable.

There is a thread on POTN somewhere that lists all the alternate hoods for use on crop bodies , eg I use the 24-105 hood on 17-40 F4 when on a crop body.


Dave
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nikesupremedunk
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Jun 09, 2011 01:03 |  #9

i'm wondering why my 70-200 f4 IS comes w/ a round hood and the 2.8's have that better looking petal hood...it's just not fair.


| Andrew | 5D Mark II | EOS-M | Canon 17-40mm f 4 L | Canon 35mm f 1.4 L | Canon 100mm f 2.8 L Macro | Canon 70-200mm f 4 L IS | Canon EF-M 22mm f 2.0 | Speedlite 430EX II|

  
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melcat
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Jun 09, 2011 07:36 |  #10

cacawcacaw wrote in post #12561929 (external link)
So how come lens hoods aren't adjustable for different focal lengths (as when used on a zoom lens)... ?

There's at least one lens which is designed so that the front element sinks down into the barrel as it zooms to longer focal lengths, thereby effectively increasing the length of the hood.

...and why aren't they adjustable to suit crop sensor camera bodies... ?

It's just one reason why a full-frame lens might not always be better on a crop body than the one designed for that body.




  
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TheRisingArms
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Jun 09, 2011 08:23 |  #11

Basically. Summarised to:
Round hood: if the front element rotates or if its a telephoto lens
Petal hood: front element doesnt rotate and is relatively wide.


Bodies: Canon 500D | Canon EOS M
Lenses: Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 | Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 | EF 50mm f/1.8 II | EF-M 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 | EF-M 22mm f/2
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design and shapes of lens hoods
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