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Thread started 20 Jun 2011 (Monday) 01:50
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Hiking with your Camera & Tripod

 
BzBrian
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Jun 20, 2011 01:50 |  #1

So I'm going to Yosemite this summer and I'm planning on carrying my Canon 7D with my 10-22mm, 50mm and Feisol 3441S tripod. I know my tripod will be strapped to my bag and the 50mm in my bag as well. But my question is, do you keep your camera in your bag when you go hiking or do you leave it around your neck (neck strap) or side (black rapid)? I'll be carrying trekking poles so it's more difficult to carry the camera on me but I still want to take photos that I see.

I'm also going with a group (non-photographers) so they wouldn't appreciate me stopping the entire group for a couple of photos.

Anyways, how do you guys carry your gear when you go on a multiday hike (backpacking)?


I'm a happy Canon SLR and Leica rangefinder user. bw!

  
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daveyboi
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Jun 20, 2011 02:23 |  #2

since you are a group of non photogs, i would invest in a cotton carrier maybe. you could always wear it around your neck depending on the neck strap or if you want a sling strap like a black rapid.


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Saint728
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Jun 20, 2011 02:50 |  #3

I would get a Capture Camera Clip and mount it to your backpack strap. If you can't get one before you leave buy a Cotton Carrier. BTW, they are going to sell another batch of the Capture Camera Clip tomorrow afternoon. First 100 people to buy one will have it shipped on Wednesday this week. http://www.kickstarter​.com …apture-camera-clip-system (external link)

Take Care,
Cheers, Patrick


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argyle
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Jun 20, 2011 07:53 as a reply to  @ Saint728's post |  #4

A lot depends on the type of "hiking" that you'll be doing. If you're walking along groomed trails, then something that keeps the camera available would be an advantage. If the hiking involves scrambling up, over, under, or around obstacles, then having your hands free and gear protected (in the pack, as opposed to simply clipped to your body or belt) is the way to go in my experience. Since you're going with a group of non-photographers, setting up and breaking down your tripod will also slow them down, so I don't see the need to be concerned with having the gear in a pack...they're going to be slowed down one way or the other. If you're worried about slowing them down while they have to wait for you, a point-and-shoot may be the better option for this type of outing since it doesn't sound like you'll have the luxury of getting the shot that YOU want when you want it.


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Ronnie ­ H
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Jun 20, 2011 08:10 |  #5

I 2nd the P&S idea,,,,they won,t want to wait on you takeing pics all the time,,,& the higher end P&S cams take very good pics,,,my wife & I both have G9 cams by Canon,,,& have got pics that are as good or better than from our Canon Dslrs,,,,,can get a nice G cam pretty cheap on the forums,,,we like the G 9 because of the extra zoom...& very good IQ....but if you must be a "pack horse" and carry all that photo Equipt,,,,then by all means,,,do so,,,,it might impress some one ???




  
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rick_reno
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Jun 20, 2011 08:58 |  #6

Like argyle said, it depends on the type of hiking. Most of the time, mine says in it's bag. I can get it out if I need it and it's not in the way.




  
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Overread
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Jun 20, 2011 11:24 |  #7

I'd be tempted to second the suggestion of a point and shoot - or one of the micro4/3rds bodies (which are a small hybrid of slr and point and shoot). In my experience when one is out with non-photographers they expect "the photographer" to be able to stop - get out the gear - take the shot and move on in the space of about 2 seconds. Any longer and its a pain (because for them it takes 2 seconds with the iphone ;)).

I'm not saying don't try with a DSLR, but that in my experience it just takes too long. That said If you're going to some really neat and new places and want to get some seriously good shots then - eh - just learn to jog a little between stops to catch up with them :)


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Phoenixkh
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Jun 20, 2011 11:45 |  #8

Patrick,

Thanks for the heads up on the Capture Camera Clip. I don't have any pressing needs so I'll wait for him to get it into actual production.... what a great idea. I put it on my "must have" list.


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Ronnie ­ H
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Jun 20, 2011 11:59 |  #9

I must add if you go on Photo shoot,,with other photographers then by all mean take it all !!




  
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ExPlanet
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Jun 20, 2011 12:22 |  #10

BzBrian wrote in post #12623991 (external link)
So I'm going to Yosemite this summer and I'm planning on carrying my Canon 7D with my 10-22mm, 50mm and Feisol 3441S tripod. I know my tripod will be strapped to my bag and the 50mm in my bag as well. But my question is, do you keep your camera in your bag when you go hiking or do you leave it around your neck (neck strap) or side (black rapid)? I'll be carrying trekking poles so it's more difficult to carry the camera on me but I still want to take photos that I see.

I'm also going with a group (non-photographers) so they wouldn't appreciate me stopping the entire group for a couple of photos.

Anyways, how do you guys carry your gear when you go on a multiday hike (backpacking)?

I do A LOT of hiking with my SLR. Most trails are 10-15 miles long, basically a day hike. I use my regular Canon strap that came with my 60D and I just use a S-Ring strapped to my CamelBak slung around my shoulder. I use the sling so that I don't have to carry the camera in my hand and I have both hands free to hold rocks or trees.

But the camera is always out when I need to take a photo. I do a mix hike of groups and sometimes just alone. Basically when you are with a group of people, you're going to be playing catch up the whole time, it helps if you're a strong hiker. I imagine a G10 or something similar might be a better idea if you are a slow hiker.

Also a mono pod might be a better idea instead of a tripod, it's easier to carry. Unless you're doing multiple exposures of the same scene, a mono will do 95% of the time.

I'll post pics of my rig when I get home so you can have a better idea of how I have it hooked up.




  
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Eileen
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Jun 20, 2011 12:38 |  #11

What trails are you going to be taking? I used to just bring a point and shoot but now always bring an SLR.

You might want to look at this: http://backcountrysolu​tions.com/ (external link) (the Keyhole camera harness). I've tested it out on long hikes while wearing a pack (climbing outings involving hiking/scrambling approaches). I like the keyhole because by slipping the neck strap around your neck you have a back up secure line to yourself (good if your hiking involves scrambling, not just a flat trail).

If you're using 2 trekking poles I recommend you not use a system that has your camera dangling on the side, or even on only one side of your backpack strap as it will get in the way of proper hiking pole usage (arms/shoulder movement). The R strap is a good product (I own one) because you can make the camera go behind you... but of course not if you have a backpack there.

I have also brought one monopod hiking stick (external link) and one regular hiking stick on easy backpack trips, though for serious backpacking I prefer two real hiking sticks.


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RPCrowe
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Jun 20, 2011 13:37 as a reply to  @ Eileen's post |  #12

IT TOTALLY DEPENDS

IMO, how I carry my camera and tripod totally depends on the purpose of the trip and, of course, the difficulty of terrain.

If your main purpose is just hiking and enjoying nature, then perhaps a P&S might be your best bet.

However if you are like me and would never walk a mile unless there was a photo opportunity somewhere along or at the end; then you might do better with a DSLR and since there is a beautiful vista around every turn in Yosemite, I would want my camera handy.

Unless you are climbing hand over hand up rocks and cliffs, a standard camera strap should suit you great. If you want to secure your camera a little better, then a Cotton Carrier would be great. However, for a lot less cash, the OPTECH Bino/Cam Harness http://optechusa.com/s​traps/bino-cam-harness.html (external link) might work. Using a standard neck strap along with a Stabilizer Strap http://optechusa.com/s​traps/stabilizer-strap.html (external link) might also do the job.

Here is the greatest problem for me as a photographer. I ABSOLUTELY HATE TO HAVE NON-PHOTOGRAPHER'S WITH ME WHEN I AM SHOOTING... I like to take my time and it is quite boring for a non-photographer to accompany a serious photographer while shooting and it is frustrating for me to try tohurry up my shooting.

I have to make a decision: am I just walking along with the group (in this case I would probably forget the trip) or am I doing it alone for photography (in which case I will thoroughly enjoy myself and occasionally come back with some very nice shots)?

I traveled to China with a group and although I achieved some very nice imagery, I can still feel the frustration of trying to keep up with the group and still attain my imagery.

When I am out shooting landscapes, I will shoot the vast majority of my images using a tripod. So when walking on smooth, somewhat level trails, I will carry my camera on the tripod over my shoulder. This is especially true in an area like Yosemite where gorgeous views are everywhere. However, when doing some strenuous hiking or climbing, I carry the camera protected and the tripod on a strap. I never carry the camera or tripod on or in a backpack except to transport it from point A to point B. It is simply too hard to get the camera and pod from the backpack and I will often disregard images because of being too lazy to take off the packpack undo the tripod and set up the camera.

The problem with many camera carriers is that the camera is attached via the tripod attachment socket. This can make using a tripod iunhandy.

BTW: I like using a Hood hat instead of a lens cap when carrying my camera. That way, it is easy to carry the camera with lens hood attached and ready for shooting.


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Saint728
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Jun 20, 2011 14:53 |  #13

RPCrowe wrote in post #12626563 (external link)
IMO, how I carry my camera and tripod totally depends on the purpose of the trip and, of course, the difficulty of terrain.

If your main purpose is just hiking and enjoying nature, then perhaps a P&S might be your best bet.

However if you are like me and would never walk a mile unless there was a photo opportunity somewhere along or at the end; then you might do better with a DSLR and since there is a beautiful vista around every turn in Yosemite, I would want my camera handy.

Unless you are climbing hand over hand up rocks and cliffs, a standard camera strap should suit you great. If you want to secure your camera a little better, then a Cotton Carrier would be great. However, for a lot less cash, the OPTECH Bino/Cam Harness http://optechusa.com/s​traps/bino-cam-harness.html (external link) might work. Using a standard neck strap along with a Stabilizer Strap http://optechusa.com/s​traps/stabilizer-strap.html (external link) might also do the job.

Here is the greatest problem for me as a photographer. I ABSOLUTELY HATE TO HAVE NON-PHOTOGRAPHER'S WITH ME WHEN I AM SHOOTING... I like to take my time and it is quite boring for a non-photographer to accompany a serious photographer while shooting and it is frustrating for me to try tohurry up my shooting.

I have to make a decision: am I just walking along with the group (in this case I would probably forget the trip) or am I doing it alone for photography (in which case I will thoroughly enjoy myself and occasionally come back with some very nice shots)?

I traveled to China with a group and although I achieved some very nice imagery, I can still feel the frustration of trying to keep up with the group and still attain my imagery.

When I am out shooting landscapes, I will shoot the vast majority of my images using a tripod. So when walking on smooth, somewhat level trails, I will carry my camera on the tripod over my shoulder. This is especially true in an area like Yosemite where gorgeous views are everywhere. However, when doing some strenuous hiking or climbing, I carry the camera protected and the tripod on a strap. I never carry the camera or tripod on or in a backpack except to transport it from point A to point B. It is simply too hard to get the camera and pod from the backpack and I will often disregard images because of being too lazy to take off the packpack undo the tripod and set up the camera.

The problem with many camera carriers is that the camera is attached via the tripod attachment socket. This can make using a tripod iunhandy.

BTW: I like using a Hood hat instead of a lens cap when carrying my camera. That way, it is easy to carry the camera with lens hood attached and ready for shooting.

Not with the Capture Camera Clip System. It is Arca-Swiss compatible, so you can use it for both camera carrier and tripod mounting without having to change anything. You can buy an Arca-Swiss QR tripod mount that will fit your existing tripod head.

Take Care,
Cheers, Patrick


Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III | 17-40mm f/4.0L | 70-200mm f/2.8L USM | 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro | 300mm f/4.0L IS
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Fstop-Ian
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Jun 20, 2011 21:07 |  #14

i would suggest a protective holster type set up attached to the bags belt or the Capture clip idea. makes life very easy and no delays with shooting. I have recently been enjoying this type of shooting while hiking.


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gocolts
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Jun 21, 2011 14:49 |  #15

I was in Yosemite last September to hike up Half Dome. Took my 7D with 28-300L attached. Put it in a top loading holster bag and put the bag in a Deuter hiking backpack, along with a water bladder, protein bars, etc. Next time I'll probably take a wide-angle lens with me along with the 28-300, and I'm sure I'll just put that single lens in a padded case and put it in the hiking backpack.

Basically, what I've learned over the years from hiking with a camera, is that it's easier to make a camera fit in a well-made hiking backpack, than to make a camera backpack fit all the other things you want to take with you, all while being really lightweight and comfortable on your back. I just make sure the camera is at the top, so it's quick to pull out and get a few shots.

Granted, Half Dome is a fairly serious hike, and we did it about 3 hours faster than most would. So it really depends what your idea of a hike is, as someone else said.




  
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Hiking with your Camera & Tripod
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