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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Weddings & Other Family Events Talk 
Thread started 09 Aug 2011 (Tuesday) 09:06
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What do you do when the bride and groom are just not happy

 
SaxonIV
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Aug 09, 2011 09:06 |  #1

I shot my first (as primary shooter) wedding this weekend. I was completely prepared, had all of my equipment meticulously prepared, and had an idea of the kinds of shots I needed.

Let me start off by saying that this wedding was pretty shotgunish. Engaged 6 weeks. The wedding took place in a cattle auction house, and was very badly lit. (aka lights were turned off on purpose)

Now i'm not talking about them not being happy with me. They loved the work I have done in the past, and were happy to book me on such short notice.

I'm talking about them not looking happy in the ceremony. Like they didn't smile, at one point they looked downright perturbed to be there in the first place. When the parents and wedding party left the ceremony walking down the isle, they all looked very disappointed. even the grandmother had a look of despair.

How do you deal with giving photos to clients, where they are just not looking their best, or just not looking like they're having a good time?




  
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peterhanowell
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Aug 09, 2011 10:08 |  #2

You don't have control over how they express themselves during the ceremony - capture it, and I suspect they will read it as 'nerves' when it comes time to viewing the photographic results.

You do, of course, have control over their expressions during other crucial parts of the day. I shoot with my wife for this reason (in part) - she could talk up ANYONE and make them smile. I can't always do that.

So, dealing with giving them the photos will be easier if you can sandwich those you think make them look unhappy with dramatic photos of getting reading and the reception, where they are happy, excited, etc.


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SMP_Homer
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Aug 09, 2011 11:12 |  #3

Unfortunately it isn't your job to control the emotions or looks on their faces...

if the wedding or venue or service (or whatever else) gave them those expressions, then that's what you capture

Maybe the family disapproves with their new in-law!


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Red ­ Tie ­ Photography
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Aug 09, 2011 14:25 |  #4

Its unfortunate, but during the ceremony there is nothing you can do. You can keep asking them to smile, or pose them romantically during your time with them, but the ceremony there is nothing you can do.


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Peacefield
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Aug 09, 2011 15:59 |  #5

I had this once. She looked positively glum all the way down the aisle and her mood never seemed to improve.

As said, there's nothing you can do. Try to capture them naturally smiling while talking with friends, etc. That's about the best you're going to get out of people like that.


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canonboy2003
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Aug 09, 2011 17:52 as a reply to  @ Peacefield's post |  #6

Bring those photos into Photoshop and use the Liquify tool. Turn those frowns into smiles! :D




  
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SaxonIV
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Aug 09, 2011 18:52 |  #7

Peacefield wrote in post #12905601 (external link)
I had this once. She looked positively glum all the way down the aisle and her mood never seemed to improve.

As said, there's nothing you can do. Try to capture them naturally smiling while talking with friends, etc. That's about the best you're going to get out of people like that.

Thank you everyone for the advice. I guess I was probably thinking the same things. It's just a shame that weddings have to be so stressful! They not only missed the bridal/bride's mades photoshoot, but as soon as she got there (45 minutes late) she was immediately shuffled to the ceremony.

I noticed that taking every combination of pictures, (mom/son, son/dad, bride/great 2nd aunt twice removed) can be extremely time consuming. Do you guys have any suggestions for organizing and streamlining that process?




  
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cdifoto
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Aug 10, 2011 06:34 |  #8

SaxonIV wrote in post #12906407 (external link)
I noticed that taking every combination of pictures, (mom/son, son/dad, bride/great 2nd aunt twice removed) can be extremely time consuming. Do you guys have any suggestions for organizing and streamlining that process?

Make a list, get someone to read the list and find the people, and don't try to make art out of them.


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Red ­ Tie ­ Photography
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Aug 10, 2011 14:32 |  #9

SaxonIV wrote in post #12906407 (external link)
Thank you everyone for the advice. I guess I was probably thinking the same things. It's just a shame that weddings have to be so stressful! They not only missed the bridal/bride's mades photoshoot, but as soon as she got there (45 minutes late) she was immediately shuffled to the ceremony.

I noticed that taking every combination of pictures, (mom/son, son/dad, bride/great 2nd aunt twice removed) can be extremely time consuming. Do you guys have any suggestions for organizing and streamlining that process?

cdifoto wrote in post #12909200 (external link)
Make a list, get someone to read the list and find the people, and don't try to make art out of them.

Exactly. Make sure you use your loud, authoritative voice as well. Dont be bossy, but command respect. They will love you if you make sure to go through them quickly.

To continue on with what cdifoto said, you dont need wonderful posing on these. In bigger groups, I place the parents closest, grandparents, then others where they fit.

I try to always do it at the ceremony cite, and find the best lighting. What I have been doing recently is setting up my strobe before the wedding, and when it is over bring everyone back and have my lighting set up quickly. Its been working well so far.


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SaxonIV
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Aug 12, 2011 08:43 |  #10

Great tips. we ended up setting up a b800 and kind of making a photo booth. shot with the 135L for blurring the ugly background for individual shots and using the 24-70 for group shots. worked out pretty well, just a bit unorganized.




  
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What do you do when the bride and groom are just not happy
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