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Thread started 09 Oct 2011 (Sunday) 10:37
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Exposure Compensation

 
Wilt
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Oct 11, 2011 10:34 |  #16

In a hockey rink, the lighting is constant and unchanging. So you can meter an 18% gray card, set your camera on Manual at the indicated shutter speed and combination, and every shot will be well exposed!


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S.Horton
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Oct 18, 2011 13:00 |  #17

^^ I think that varies by rink. I shoot in one where that is true, in another where the two types of light involved seems to make it vary up to 1/2 stop on the subject's face. I don't have 10K shots in Hockey yet, though, so I have no solid evidence beyond what I'm seeing in post.

What I am sure of is that getting stuck behind the glass is very, very bad. The quality is horrible.

@OP since I'm moving around all the time to rinks I have never been in before, I'll shoot the warm-up, watch the histogram, and expose such that I have a right leaning histogram. I do not care about blowing out whites, as there is no detail there, for example in the helmets.

In short, I cheat, and I can't think of a better way, because I really have no idea what lighting I will encounter.

WB issues I have to correct in post, and if I get a shot with a mixed WB and I really want it, I do one of two things.

If the shot is just for safety, in other words being sure I have every kid with the puck, then I'll correct for the face/front and let the second WB go wherever it will. If it is a peek action keeper, then I will process both WBs by hand in Photoshop using layers.

In any event, the amount of noise in the blacks means they're going to get hit hard with noise reduction in post anyway, so my goal is to properly expose the faces, in general.


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Wilt
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Oct 18, 2011 15:25 |  #18

S.Horton wrote in post #13268238 (external link)
^^ I think that varies by rink. I shoot in one where that is true, in another where the two types of light involved seems to make it vary up to 1/2 stop on the subject's face. I don't have 10K shots in Hockey yet, though, so I have no solid evidence beyond what I'm seeing in post.

My point is that even if there is 0.5EV variability in light intensity across the entire rink, it is still far better to use a FIXED EXPOSURE setting for all shots, rather than having to deal with shot-to-shot variability caused by changes in frame content with variability of the jersey color mix and how much/how little ice appears in the frame! For example, if our exposure was fixed at 1/400 f/4 and the lighting dictated exposures at 1/500 f/4 at the bright end and 1/250 f/4 at the dim end, we have shots no more than +0.33EV to -0.66EV out of ideal, quite easy to cope with during RAW conversion processing. Much better than +1.0EV overexposure when lots of black jerseys are filling the screen vs. -1.5EV underexposure when a single white jersey backed by the white ice is filling the screen and fooling the reflected light meter!


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rsandberg
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Oct 19, 2011 11:28 |  #19

Wilt wrote in post #13269060 (external link)
My point is that even if there is 0.5EV variability in light intensity across the entire rink, it is still far better to use a FIXED EXPOSURE setting for all shots, rather than having to deal with shot-to-shot variability caused by changes in frame content with variability of the jersey color mix and how much/how little ice appears in the frame! For example, if our exposure was fixed at 1/400 f/4 and the lighting dictated exposures at 1/500 f/4 at the bright end and 1/250 f/4 at the dim end, we have shots no more than +0.33EV to -0.66EV out of ideal, quite easy to cope with during RAW conversion processing. Much better than +1.0EV overexposure when lots of black jerseys are filling the screen vs. -1.5EV underexposure when a single white jersey backed by the white ice is filling the screen and fooling the reflected light meter!

I am a novice but agree with this completely. I used to run 1/500, F2.8, Auto ISO, spot metering.

The variability from shot to shot meant a lot more PP.
Now, I meter and set the ISO to a fixed value (normally between 200 and 3200).
It saves a lot of time later.

For WB i usually just take a photo of the ice and use that (in camera - custom wb).

Rick


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S.Horton
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Oct 19, 2011 14:12 |  #20

Wilt wrote in post #13269060 (external link)
My point is that even if there is 0.5EV variability in light intensity across the entire rink, it is still far better to use a FIXED EXPOSURE setting for all shots, rather than having to deal with shot-to-shot variability caused by changes in frame content with variability of the jersey color mix and how much/how little ice appears in the frame! For example, if our exposure was fixed at 1/400 f/4 and the lighting dictated exposures at 1/500 f/4 at the bright end and 1/250 f/4 at the dim end, we have shots no more than +0.33EV to -0.66EV out of ideal, quite easy to cope with during RAW conversion processing. Much better than +1.0EV overexposure when lots of black jerseys are filling the screen vs. -1.5EV underexposure when a single white jersey backed by the white ice is filling the screen and fooling the reflected light meter!

True 100%.

OP asked about EC.

When my wife grabs the gear and I won't be there, I do set up using EC so that something comes back which I can work with.

;)


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Wilt
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Oct 19, 2011 18:03 |  #21

S.Horton wrote in post #13274458 (external link)
True 100%.

OP asked about EC.

When my wife grabs the gear and I won't be there, I do set up using EC so that something comes back which I can work with.

;)

Let us assume we set up EC -1 in an Av mode camera, and the issue of the quantity of black jerseys vs. white jerseys in the frame still applies. So, using my Post 18 assumptions, we end up with shots in a range from 0EV with lots of black jerseys are filling the screen vs. -2.5EV underexposure when a single white jersey backed by the white ice is filling the screen and fooling the reflected light meter!


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Exposure Compensation
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