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Thread started 13 Nov 2005 (Sunday) 21:57
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Correcting Perspective - CS2 vs PTGui

 
Scottes
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Nov 13, 2005 21:57 |  #1

I took this shot this morning, 17-40 L @ 17mm.

IMAGE: http://www.itsanadventure.com/postimages/Boston_63203_Org.jpg

Those leaning buildings drove me crazy. So I tried correcting it with CS2's Perspective Transform:

IMAGE: http://www.itsanadventure.com/postimages/Boston_63203_PS.jpg

Lastly I tried PTGui to see what it would do. (Note that PTAssembler or Hugin would perform almost identically the same.)

IMAGE: http://www.itsanadventure.com/postimages/Boston_63203_PTGui.jpg

To me, the PTGui version is slightly better than the PS Transform version. The building on the left still seems to bow a little in the PS version, whereas it looks straighter in the PTGui version. The yacht on the right looks a little squashed in the PS version, and looks more like the original in the PTGui version.

However, it's fairly difficult to tell from the above two images, so a rollover might help. Click the following page and move your mouse over the image and off again, and it will flip between the two.
http://www.itsanadvent​ure.com/postimages/Bos​ton_63203.html (external link)


Was it worth it? Perhaps 1 minute with PS Transform versus several minutes with PTGui - plus several more minutes waiting for PTGui to transform the image. I like the PTGui version since it looks more like the real scene, but then again I was there in real life while you weren't.

Thought or comments?

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tim
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Nov 13, 2005 22:37 |  #2

I'd be happy with either - which is easier to use?


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Fencer
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Nov 14, 2005 04:38 |  #3

You seem to have lost quite a bit of colour and depth in both the conversions - particularly PTgui but being able to verticalise buildings is a great tool.




  
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Scottes
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Nov 14, 2005 05:17 |  #4

Tim, the PS Transform is much easier. Unless you're picky about exact reproduction it's the way to go.

Fencer, I think I may have saved the PTGui version without converting to SRGB - the color issue on that one looks like a profile mis-match.


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nitsch
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Nov 14, 2005 05:19 |  #5

I like the PTGui correction best out of the two, however I think the original looks good too! Thanks for sharing.




  
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Nov 14, 2005 05:48 |  #6

Has anyone tried the Lens correction tool in PSCS2?
I find its very good at correcting this sort of image

Dave.


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Scottes
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Nov 14, 2005 06:19 as a reply to  @ dave_bass5's post |  #7

dave_bass5 wrote:
Has anyone tried the Lens correction tool in PSCS2?
I find its very good at correcting this sort of image

I *knew* there was something new in CS2 for this - I was just too tired to really think about it last night.

But here it is, the CS2 Lens Correction version:

IMAGE: http://www.itsanadventure.com/postimages/Boston_63203_PSLens.jpg

This got me to realize a couple other points about this whole thing.

Using PS's Transform... Perspective was the easiest, but in my opinion the least exact and very subjective. It's difficult to get the final image perfectly correct, and you really are "guessing" a bit. That is, you make the adjustment until it looks good. Subjective and not at all scientific. I also don't think it does a very good job across the entire image. It's easy to get the building on the left to look good, but I don't think the right-most building looks equally as good.

CS2's Lens Correction was a bit more difficult (time-consuming) but it's not like it took much time. It's also somewhat subjective, but the grid makes things much easier and much more exact. Being able to correct the barrel distortion was a huge plus in my opinion, and got rid of the slight bulging of the building on the left. (It also can correct vignetting and chromatic aberration, so that's two more big plusses.) Though the differences are slight between the two PS images there's no doubt in my mind that the Lens Correction filter is better, and worth the extra minute to use. But I'm still not happy with the entire image, and I don't like the right-most building very much.

The PTGui version is less subjective and much more scientific. The process involves mathematical data to correct the distortion caused by the angle of the lens. Furthermore I was able to place control points on all the buildings which allows me to be exact about which lines in the image should be perfectly vertical. So I was able to get the right-most building looking as straight as the left-most building. PTGui also corrects the "horizon warping" caused by the wide angle lens. This is not a good example image for this since the horizon line is uneven, so it's not very noticable. But I also ran this image through PTLens (which uses the same mathematical correction formulas as PTGui) and the correction would be quite noticable on an image with a straight horizon line.

However, PTGui was by far the most difficult to use and far more time-consuming. I know PTGui fairly well so it's easy for me, but I don't recommend learning it just to correct wide-angle distortions unless you a perfectionist. Especially if you have CS2.

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Nov 14, 2005 06:39 |  #8

one of the great things about the lens correction tool is that it works with AE4 as well, as do a few of the other new filters (but not smart sharpen)

Dave.


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Scottes
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Nov 14, 2005 06:57 as a reply to  @ dave_bass5's post |  #9

dave_bass5 wrote:
one of the great things about the lens correction tool is that it works with AE4 as well, as do a few of the other new filters (but not smart sharpen)

What is AE4?

I did appreciate the fact that it works on 16-bit images.


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Nov 14, 2005 07:03 |  #10

AE4 = Adobe Elements 4.
I have used PSCS(2) for a while but am finding myself useing Elements more and more as i find its quicker and as i tend to use plugins a lot i dont really need all the features of CS2.

Dave.


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thomascanty
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Nov 14, 2005 08:09 |  #11

I still haven't looked at either of these tools in CS2. I need to. I have a couple pictures that could use this. I also never heard of PTGui. Panorama Tools always looked too complicated to me, so I never gave it a chance. I think I'm going to have to force myself to learn how to use it.


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Scottes
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Nov 14, 2005 08:33 |  #12

Lonnie, PanoTools and it's front-ends are not for the faint of heart. It does require some time investment. To simply fix a few images it's not worth it, in my opinion. Since I use it a lot for panos it's second nature to me now, so if I'm picky I can wait for the image to be corrected.


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Nov 14, 2005 08:33 as a reply to  @ thomascanty's post |  #13

I hope you don't mind that I tested this with your pic. If so, I will remove this version...

I was interested in seing how PaintShop Pro X performs on this, as that is my main graphics software. I copied your original picture into PSP, made a 25% barrel distortion correction, then a perspective correction (selecting the vertical lines of the towers to the left and right as reference) and finally just a sharpen. This pic was then saved with 13% jpeg compression. In my opinion PSP performs pretty well...

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Scottes
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Nov 14, 2005 08:37 |  #14

That's a great addition to the thread - I welcome it.

I'd have to say that PSP did a darned fine job. That looks great. I think the building on the right looks better than the PS versions, though the left building looks a little skinny to me. Still an excellent job.


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Nov 14, 2005 10:08 |  #15

A simpler solution would to point the cam down & get the back as verticle as possible. Then clone in more sky if you need it.


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