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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 30 Dec 2011 (Friday) 15:08
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Can a sensor be cleaned with Isopropyl Alcohol?

 
Shadow ­ on ­ the ­ Door
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Dec 31, 2011 16:02 |  #46
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I'm not arguing the point, I didn't end up doing it, just spent some extra time with my friend spot removal.


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Nicholas ­ R.
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Dec 31, 2011 16:03 |  #47

Shadow on the Door wrote in post #13626359 (external link)
I'm not arguing the point, I didn't end up doing it, just spent some extra time with my friend spot removal.

I think you made a wise decision.

Nicholas




  
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Oggy1
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Dec 31, 2011 16:17 |  #48

One point - Eclipse E2 is now extinct. It was a temporary measure brought in by Photosol after a panic rumour that Eclipse fluid was attacking some cameras (5DMkII IIRC). This was subsequently froved to be false and production of E2 was stopped.


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hollis_f
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Dec 31, 2011 17:10 |  #49

Oggy1 wrote in post #13626424 (external link)
One point - Eclipse E2 is now extinct. It was a temporary measure brought in by Photosol after a panic rumour that Eclipse fluid was attacking some cameras (5DMkII IIRC). This was subsequently froved to be false and production of E2 was stopped.

This is true, as are these facts.

Eclipse 2 is a mix of propan-2-ol and water.
Eclipse 2 was introduced as a 'gentler' cleaning solution than original Eclipse
The manufacturers (who would, one assumes, know a bit more about the topic than anybody on PotN) thought that a Propan-2-ol mix was suitable for cleaning sensors and less likely to damage them than pure methanol.

Given that set of facts I repeat that I would have no qualms about using propan-2-ol to clean a sensor.

Indeed, I may have lost my bottle of Eclipse (the 7D's auto clean is so good I've not needed it in two years), and if I do find I need to wet-clean the sensor I'll probably use some of the 99.9% propan-2-ol I bought from Amazon (only £5 for 500ml - that's enough lens cleaning solution to last a couple of lifetimes, and about 1% of the cost of buying the proprietary stuff - which is just propanol/water with a bit of soap added)


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xarqi
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Dec 31, 2011 18:14 |  #50

For the non-organic chemists among us, propan-2-ol = 2-propanol = isopropanol = isopropyl alcohol = IPA = rubbing alcohol




  
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watt100
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Dec 31, 2011 18:35 |  #51

amfoto1 wrote in post #13625909 (external link)
NEVER EVER use a Q-Tip or similar, common cotton swab inside a camera. It's a really bad and risky idea. T.

yeah, that's a bad idea. I use pec pads and eclipse




  
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TomCross13
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Dec 31, 2011 20:59 |  #52

When I first got my camera i switched lenses all the time and didn't do it properly before I joined POTN. Then I realized my mistakes and checked out some sensor cleaning kits and watched a few YouTube videos on how to do it. So I called my local photo hobby shop which has a good reputation and I bought an L lens from them and I asked how much for a sensor cleaning kit? They said $135. So it seems like most people clean their own sensor with the pec pads and a sensor cleaning solution, so should I just be doing that whenever needed? I haven't ever cleaned mine.


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Nicholas ­ R.
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Dec 31, 2011 21:17 |  #53

TomCross13 wrote in post #13627455 (external link)
When I first got my camera i switched lenses all the time and didn't do it properly before I joined POTN. Then I realized my mistakes and checked out some sensor cleaning kits and watched a few YouTube videos on how to do it. So I called my local photo hobby shop which has a good reputation and I bought an L lens from them and I asked how much for a sensor cleaning kit? They said $135. So it seems like most people clean their own sensor with the pec pads and a sensor cleaning solution, so should I just be doing that whenever needed? I haven't ever cleaned mine.

Tom,

I spoke to a lady not too long ago who paid $175 to a camera repair shop in St. Louis, and they did a terrible job, too. It's really easy to clean your own sensor, especially after getting a few sessions under your belt, but some people are just not cut out for it, and that's perfectly fine. Many people choose to stay with the dry tools and leave the wet stuff to others, if at all.

Nicholas




  
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tonylong
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Dec 31, 2011 21:53 |  #54

TomCross13 wrote in post #13627455 (external link)
When I first got my camera i switched lenses all the time and didn't do it properly before I joined POTN. Then I realized my mistakes and checked out some sensor cleaning kits and watched a few YouTube videos on how to do it. So I called my local photo hobby shop which has a good reputation and I bought an L lens from them and I asked how much for a sensor cleaning kit? They said $135. So it seems like most people clean their own sensor with the pec pads and a sensor cleaning solution, so should I just be doing that whenever needed? I haven't ever cleaned mine.

A blower, such as a Rocket Blower, is a good "first line" easy, quick, and sometimes actually does the job.

And then, there are "dry cleaning" products that come in the form of sensor brushes, sensor pens, and such.

The compressed air method is one which I've never tried, but if Nicholas from Copperhill vouches for it, then just make sure you follow the directions so that your air will be free of "stuff".

And then comes the wet cleaning if all else fails. I've always had the kit, Eclipse and Sensor Swabs, because there are times when the other stuff hasn't cut it. Now I do have one body, the 1D3, with the self-cleaning thing, and I don't recall needing to wet-clean that rig. But I've also owned a 30D and 5DC, which don't have the self-cleaning. Each of them I have wet cleaned a number of times, although only when they need it:)!

Each method requires a but of care and common sense, but they all have a place!


Tony
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TomCross13
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Dec 31, 2011 22:03 |  #55

Cool, I'm mechanically inclined so I'll pick up a kit from BH.


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proletsearch
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Dec 31, 2011 22:03 |  #56

Take a look at this video with sound turned off, if you do not speak German. The product used is originaly produced for cleaning music plates, but I like the method. If you want to try this at home, you will need to understand what the man explains - like the time to dry and other details...
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=6s_AxUWFXe4 (external link)


Canon EOS 600D gripped, Canon EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS Mark II - Youtube (external link):: Flickr (external link)

  
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Nicholas ­ R.
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Jan 01, 2012 07:32 |  #57

proletsearch wrote in post #13627642 (external link)
Take a look at this video with sound turned off, if you do not speak German. The product used is originaly produced for cleaning music plates, but I like the method. If you want to try this at home, you will need to understand what the man explains - like the time to dry and other details...
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=6s_AxUWFXe4 (external link)

This stuff has been around for a while and just like with adhesives, there is virtually NO positive feedback anywhere besides from the companies selling the products. Although the actual removal of dust and debris probably works, there remain a couple of sticking points (pun):

1) leaving the camera body open for that long a time for curing is sure to let in tons of ambient dust into the chamber
2) there is no evidence that it will remove lubricant
3) do NOT get that stuff on anything else besides the sensor, bad chemical reactions will occur

Nicholas




  
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proletsearch
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Jan 01, 2012 08:45 |  #58

Nicholas R. wrote in post #13628644 (external link)
This stuff has been around for a while and just like with adhesives, there is virtually NO positive feedback anywhere besides from the companies selling the products. Although the actual removal of dust and debris probably works, there remain a couple of sticking points (pun):

1) leaving the camera body open for that long a time for curing is sure to let in tons of ambient dust into the chamber
2) there is no evidence that it will remove lubricant
3) do NOT get that stuff on anything else besides the sensor, bad chemical reactions will occur

Nicholas

You obviously miss the point here: This product is created to be used for dusty music plates. The guy in this video explains why it may be used for sensor cleaning as well.

The camera body is not left completly open - is covered with paper. It is explained, that after the procedure you need to blow the dust out of the chamber.
The product itself is based on water and can be removed any time also with water. No chemical reactions will occur.
You clean not the sensor, but the filter infront of the sensor, which is around 4mm thick.

But as I have stated, do not use it, if you do not understand the complete video tutorial!
The drawback of this method is: it takes around 2.5 hours or more.


Canon EOS 600D gripped, Canon EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS Mark II - Youtube (external link):: Flickr (external link)

  
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Nicholas ­ R.
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Jan 01, 2012 08:52 |  #59

proletsearch wrote in post #13628771 (external link)
You obviously miss the point here: This product is created to be used for dusty music plates. The guy in this video explains why it may be used for sensor cleaning as well.

The camera body is not left completly open - is covered with paper. It is explained, that after the procedure you need to blow the dust out of the chamber.
The product itself is based on water and can be removed any time also with water. No chemical reactions will occur.
You clean not the sensor, but the filter infront of the sensor, which is around 4mm thick.

But as I have stated, do not use it, if you do not understand the complete video tutorial!
The drawback of this method is: it takes around 2.5 hours or more.

This product has been around for about 4 years and if it were as fantastic for sensor cleaning as the video claims, the buzz would be all over the internet - NOT. I understand the video and I know about cut-filters, too. The bottom line is that it is an ultra-high-tech product trying to do what a low-tech product does beautifully. If you want to try it and get back to us, go for it.

Cheers!
Nicholas




  
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RTPVid
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Jan 01, 2012 09:15 |  #60

What's a music plate?


Tom

  
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Can a sensor be cleaned with Isopropyl Alcohol?
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