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FORUMS General Gear Talk Computers 
Thread started 25 Jan 2012 (Wednesday) 17:32
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Would you trust the "cloud" with your storage?

 
Shadow ­ on ­ the ­ Door
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Jan 25, 2012 17:32 |  #1
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I'm once again at the point where I've filled up an entire hard drive and need to choose to either go buy another 1TB, or switch to the increasingly popular cloud storage service offered by many online companies. My site host offers it, my ISP offers it, and 1000 other seemingly trustworthy sites offer it, but I'm hesitant to jump ship from physical storage to online storage, it would save me a lot of money in the long run, though. Has anyone tried cloud storage and had any issues? It seems like, especially with the mega companies like google, apple, or microsoft there would be very little risk since all of their data is stored and copied in so many different locations. Privacy is not a concern for me.


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1Tanker
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Jan 25, 2012 18:37 |  #2

Nope, haven't tried it.. and don't plan to. I must admit, i'm generally a late-adopter, but i still don't trust it. In fact, i don't even like wireless.. i guess i'm paranoid in some ways, maybe careless in others. :confused:


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tim
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Jan 25, 2012 18:45 |  #3

Some thoughts:
- Cloud storage is slow, expensive, and isn't always available
- Hard drives are cheap, fast, and always available.
- You need to have backups of your data offsite. ALL hard drives fail, the only question is when. Fire can destroy onsite backups.
- Remote "cloud" storage is fine for backups, but isn't really practical at the sort of data volumes most people these days have.


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Jan 25, 2012 18:56 |  #4

This cloud stuff has had me amused for a while. There ain't no such thing as an amorphous digital storage area drifting in space. All data storage requires a media of some sort--at least for now. It may be spread out over multiple servers so that, if one goes down, there is backup. For that matter I have a RAID sitting next to my computer. I copy everything into it. Then there are 1 and 1.5 TB hard drives, enough that there are two copies of a years worth of shooting. And every so often I get ambitious and make Bluray copies of everything, especially anything that goes into the RAID.


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tim
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Jan 25, 2012 19:08 |  #5

A fire can take out a RAID array as easily as one disk. Raid is not a backup.


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advaitin
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Jan 25, 2012 21:14 |  #6

tim wrote in post #13768735 (external link)
A fire can take out a RAID array as easily as one disk. Raid is not a backup.

True enough, you do need to store one of your backups in a separate or fireproof location. It is convenient, however to be able to access several years of work without having to open the vault.


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Jan 25, 2012 21:39 |  #7

tim wrote in post #13768735 (external link)
A fire can take out a RAID array as easily as one disk. Raid is not a backup.

Normally you would be right, but it becomes one if it's in a different building from the source. I'm thinking about building up an old PC to be nothing but a RAID host, attached via a Gbit bonded pair, probably 500GB 8 drives.


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mrwalker
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Jan 27, 2012 11:00 |  #8

If you really are out of local space then you absolutely have to buy additional hard drives...

Even if you are not worried about privacy you always need local storage (which you can mirror/ backup to the cloud) as your primary.


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Shadow ­ on ­ the ­ Door
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Jan 27, 2012 11:11 |  #9
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why though? it's easy to say you need something without any justification.


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mmcguire
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Jan 27, 2012 11:38 |  #10

I would trust cloud based storage, but only as a backup. What if the cloud storage company goes belly up? What happens to your photos?




  
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Shadow ­ on ­ the ­ Door
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Jan 27, 2012 12:26 |  #11
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well I guess there's that, especially since everyone who was hosting with megaupload just got screwed over.


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Todd ­ Lambert
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Jan 27, 2012 12:32 |  #12

Yes, I would trust Amazon or Dropbox or Google or Apple.

That's it though.

I buy HDs in twos.. one for backup and another is a replicant that then gets put into a safe deposit box at my bank.

Beyond that, I take my very best stuff, and that gets put into the cloud, for ease and for extra precaution.




  
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jasonlitka
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Jan 27, 2012 16:37 |  #13

tim wrote in post #13768602 (external link)
- Cloud storage is slow, expensive, and isn't always available

No, your internet connection is. Sometimes, depends on the provider and your needs. That hasn't been my experience, unless you mean it's not available when your internet connection isn't working.

tim wrote in post #13768602 (external link)
- Hard drives are cheap, fast, and always available.

Not currently, floods have driven the prices up. 5400RPM disks are pretty slow. Sure, until they break or your forget it somewhere.

tim wrote in post #13768602 (external link)
- You need to have backups of your data offsite. ALL hard drives fail, the only question is when. Fire can destroy onsite backups.

100% true. I lost two disks from a SAN just yesterday. The first started making a clicking sound so I replaced it. The second died about 60 seconds later during the RAID reconstruction. These were $1000 15K RPM disks.

tim wrote in post #13768602 (external link)
- Remote "cloud" storage is fine for backups, but isn't really practical at the sort of data volumes most people these days have.

I disagree. Between my personal needs (Amazon S3 & CrashPlan), my primary job (Amazon S3), and the odd consulting job (Amazon S3 & RackSpace CloudFiles), I've got around 50TiB stored off-site.


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Jan 27, 2012 16:58 as a reply to  @ jasonlitka's post |  #14

Well, you should have a local hard-drive and a remote backup (as well as your PC hard-drive, which usually is only ~250-500gb). If you fill one (& it's remote backup), simply buy 2 more (1 local/1 backup) and start all over.

Always keep a local and a remote store of everything.

IMO, cloud is only good for sharing stuff, not for safe storage.

You might also keep in mind that technology will continue to advance, and sometime in the future you may have to switch it ALL out.


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tim
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Jan 29, 2012 14:24 |  #15

jasonlitka wrote in post #13779937 (external link)
No, your internet connection is. Sometimes, depends on the provider and your needs. That hasn't been my experience, unless you mean it's not available when your internet connection isn't working.

Where the bottleneck is isn't that important.

jasonlitka wrote in post #13779937 (external link)
Not currently, floods have driven the prices up. 5400RPM disks are pretty slow. Sure, until they break or your forget it somewhere.

They're still a lot cheaper than online storage, when you include the cost of data transmission. The US current has flat rate data, and fast, but that's changing to pay as you go to be in line with the rest of the world.

jasonlitka wrote in post #13779937 (external link)
I disagree. Between my personal needs (Amazon S3 & CrashPlan), my primary job (Amazon S3), and the odd consulting job (Amazon S3 & RackSpace CloudFiles), I've got around 50TiB stored off-site.

On Amazon S3, 50TB of storage costs $700/month (external link) and at a very optimistic 10Mbps upload would take 462 days to upload (assuming I did my sums right). There are flat rate storage schemes for photos, but you still have to upload them.

My point is while it's possible, it's not very practical yet.


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Would you trust the "cloud" with your storage?
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