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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 06 Apr 2012 (Friday) 12:02
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Image Stabilization Question

 
Jjwheels723
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Apr 06, 2012 12:02 |  #1

Hello All,
I have a friend who's not into photography, but quite a tech guru.
He recently told me that the IS used in camera lenses requires a
"second or two", when the shutter is half pressed to become effective.
This would mean that a quick shot with the camera would effectively
be without IS. Is there anything to what he says?
Jim




  
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Snydremark
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Apr 06, 2012 12:10 |  #2

Jjwheels723 wrote in post #14220542 (external link)
Hello All,
I have a friend who's not into photography, but quite a tech guru.
He recently told me that the IS used in camera lenses requires a
"second or two", when the shutter is half pressed to become effective.
This would mean that a quick shot with the camera would effectively
be without IS. Is there anything to what he says?
Jim

Yup, you're both correct. If you're using IS you need to give it a short time to spin up (.5 - 1 sec) and settle in; this is the reason that sports/action shooters don't tend to care for IS. If you have to "shoot from the hip" and grab a shot instantly, the IS *can* actually induce a slight bit of blur. I still prefer it on all of my lenses, for when I'm shooting things I can predict and have IS already running before needing to take the shot, though.

The IS also runs for a short time AFTER releasing the shutter button, during which time you shouldn't change lenses, etc. Again, only .5 - 1 sec, normally.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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FeXL
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Apr 06, 2012 13:27 |  #3

Snydremark wrote in post #14220592 (external link)
this is the reason that sports/action shooters don't tend to care for IS.

Got nuttin' to do with spin up time. If you're shooting action properly, the viewfinder should never leave your eye, your finger should never leave the half depressed shutter button position (keeping the subject in focus in AI Servo mode) and the IS should never spin down.

This sports/action shooter doesn't like IS because it doesn't work with moving subjects (pan mode notwithstanding).




  
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GooseberryVisuals
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Apr 06, 2012 17:28 |  #4

FeXL wrote in post #14220995 (external link)
This sports/action shooter doesn't like IS because it doesn't work with moving subjects (pan mode notwithstanding).

Sports photogs don't like it because they're usually at 1/500 or faster anyway




  
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amfoto1
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Apr 06, 2012 18:51 |  #5

This sports shooter loves IS on long lenses and has been shooting with it for over ten years. I can take it or leave it on shorter lenses. But on 100mm and up, I prefer to have it.

Is does take a moment to get up to speed.... I'd say it's more like a half second usually, and really it's happening at the same time the camera is acquiring focus, so there's no loss. You're likely to have problems with both focus and IS if you really stab a shot, going from finger off the shutter release to full release quickly (but that would be lousy technique even if shooting film cameras and manual focus lenses).

Normally I've got the shutter release half pressed before I've even got the camera all the way up to my eye, so IS is already started. Then, using Back Button Focusing, I get the subject in focus. By then, IS is fully up to speed.

I've taken extremely fast shots "from the hip" that way and not had any trouble with IS lag... You can see it working and snap into a stabilized image in the viewfinder. Usually, if holding the camera reasonably steady, it's maybe a half second usually... not "a second or two".


Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
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sandpiper
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Apr 06, 2012 19:02 as a reply to  @ amfoto1's post |  #6

As has been mentioned, there is a short spin up time to allow for, after first half pressing the shutter button. So, if you just mash the shutter release straight down in one movement you can catch the IS whilst it is still settling and cause a blurry image.

In practice it isn't a problem though, as you simply hold the release at the part way point as you line up the shot. If you don't use back button (or manual) focusing, you need to pause at the half way pressed point anyway, while the camera focuses the lens.




  
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1Tanker
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Apr 06, 2012 19:11 |  #7

Jjwheels723 wrote in post #14220542 (external link)
Hello All,
I have a friend who's not into photography, but quite a tech guru.
He recently told me that the IS used in camera lenses requires a
"second or two", when the shutter is half pressed to become effective.
This would mean that a quick shot with the camera would effectively
be without IS. Is there anything to what he says?
Jim

As a "techie", he should know that lenses are computerized nowadays.. and that they react in milliseconds. This leaves the "mechanical" aspect of the IS to come into play.. which is still near-instantaneous. I'm not a "sports shooter", but IS has never caused me troubles with sports yet, and i happen to like it for sports. If you're super-anal about such things, IS can be turned off as well. ;)


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Image Stabilization Question
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