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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 07 Apr 2012 (Saturday) 08:38
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Stuck pixels in 5D3

 
mrmarks
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Apr 07, 2012 08:38 |  #1

Just picked up my 5D3 and did a stuck pixel test at various ISO. At ISO 1000, I can detect about 10 spots, which after a few 1-min manual "cleaning" steps, did not go away. Should I be concerned about this and get my 5D3 changed? Do you have any idea what is Canon's specifications for stuck pixels? Thanks for the inputs.




  
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jwcdds
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Apr 07, 2012 08:51 |  #2

If they're not present at iso 100, then I wouldn't worry about it and I doubt Canon would do anything either. They're "hot" pixels and not "dead" pixels, right?

If you send it back to Canon, they'll just simply map it out. You can try and convince the seller for an exchange, but no guarantee that the next camera will be better or worse.


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Invertalon
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Apr 07, 2012 09:24 |  #3

I have not seen any stuck/dead pixels with my 5D3, but Lightroom generally maps them out anyway automatically if there are any.


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Richard371
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Apr 07, 2012 10:06 |  #4

Turn on live view to warm up the sensors for 3 or 4 mins. Then immediately initiate a manual sensor clean with the lens on. This will alow the camera to map out the hot pixels. Worked for mine.




  
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Andrew_WOT
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Apr 07, 2012 11:48 |  #5

Richard371 wrote in post #14225153 (external link)
Turn on live view to warm up the sensors for 3 or 4 mins. Then immediately initiate a manual sensor clean with the lens on. This will alow the camera to map out the hot pixels. Worked for mine.

I believe lens cap should be on as well.




  
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mrmarks
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Apr 07, 2012 12:30 |  #6

jwcdds wrote in post #14224837 (external link)
If they're not present at iso 100, then I wouldn't worry about it and I doubt Canon would do anything either. They're "hot" pixels and not "dead" pixels, right?

If you send it back to Canon, they'll just simply map it out. You can try and convince the seller for an exchange, but no guarantee that the next camera will be better or worse.

No hot pixels detected at ISO 100




  
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mrmarks
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Apr 07, 2012 12:31 |  #7

Invertalon wrote in post #14224958 (external link)
I have not seen any stuck/dead pixels with my 5D3, but Lightroom generally maps them out anyway automatically if there are any.

At which ISO did you test? I used the method outlined here http://www.slashgear.c​om …your-digital-slr-2227392/ (external link)




  
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mrmarks
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Apr 07, 2012 12:32 |  #8

Richard371 wrote in post #14225153 (external link)
Turn on live view to warm up the sensors for 3 or 4 mins. Then immediately initiate a manual sensor clean with the lens on. This will alow the camera to map out the hot pixels. Worked for mine.

Actually, this did the trick! After live view (without lens cap) for 3-4 mins, then manual sensor clean for 1 min, the hot pixels were almost cleaned up even at ISO 1000. Thanks! So, I guess the stuck pixels needed to be "excited" a little.




  
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Andrew_WOT
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Apr 07, 2012 15:38 |  #9

mrmarks wrote in post #14225741 (external link)
Actually, this did the trick! After live view (without lens cap) for 3-4 mins, then manual sensor clean for 1 min, the hot pixels were almost cleaned up even at ISO 1000. Thanks! So, I guess the stuck pixels needed to be "excited" a little.

I meant lens cap on during cleaning not when heating the sensor via live view, not sure if that's critical. Below if the full instruction, don't remember where I grabbed it from:

Canon Hot(dead) pixel fix (do it in dark room):

Step 1 - Detach the lens from your Canon camera
Step 2 - Put on the camera cap (do not leave your camera open).

Step 3 - Turn your camera on. Go to the menu and select "Sensor cleaning" under the utilities menu.

Step 4 - Turn the dial to select "Clean manually" under the sensor cleaning option.

Step 5 - Turn the dial to select "OK" and then press the "Set" button. The mirror will lock up and the shutter will open. Allow the shutter to remain open for at least 30 seconds. In your case I'd leave it sitting like that for 60 seconds.
Step 6 - Turn your camera off and reattach the lens.

Take a few test shots to see if the problem has been corrected.

Background Info:
---------------
There is really no mystery about sensors having bad pixels- they all do but the cameras map the true dead and stuck pixels out. The confusion comes from newbies that don't understand how hot pixels behave. As explained by others above hot pixels are just pixels that have greater than average dark current. The visibility of dark current scales by exposure time and ISO, and dark current itself increases very rapidly with increased sensor temperature. This means that for long exposures especially at higher ISO settings "hot" pixels will appear to be stuck on: even though they may work OK for short duration low ISO exposures.

It is true that current Canon DSLR cameras create a new bad pixel map whenever the firmware is updated or the manual sensor clean function is selected (I have personally verified this for my 5D2 which has two hot pixels). Newbies may report that this doesn't fix their hot pixels because the function only maps out pixels that are bad enough to appear stuck for exposures of about one second at ISO 100. Pixels that work at this setting are not mapped out because they work fine for typical photographs. If you care most about long exposures then you can increase the number of pixels mapped out by first heating up the sensor by using live view. If the manual sensor clean is selected right after using live view for at least two minutes then the increased sensor temperature will result in more of the marginal pixels appearing as stuck to (and therefore mapped out by) the mapping out routine. Of course this will need to be repeated after every time the sensor is cleaned or the firmware is updated or the marginal pixels will reappear.

If the number of hot pixels is still too much for your liking then you can turn on the long exposure noise reduction function or better yet just use Lightroom or Photoshop to perform the raw conversion. These programs use Adobe's ACR that does a good job of removing hot pixels. This is much preferable to the Nikon method which always applies a crude hot pixel removal routine to the raw data of images with exposures of about one second or longer. This forced Nikon hot pixel suppression is probably why there are less complaints about hot pixels in the Nikon forums but it also removes real small image details like faint stars in the night sky. This is one reason why Canon cameras are often preferred for amateur astronomy.

No I am not a sensor designer- but I doubt that you will get someone like Eric Fossum to answer such a basic question. A great deal of information about sensors is freely available though. There are many papers available from the past workshops that Fossum organizes:
http://www.imagesensor​s.org …hops/Past%20Wor​kshops.htm (external link)

Here are two papers about modeling dark current from a Google search:

http://www.ee.bgu.ac.i​l …APS_DC_Modeling​_Final.pdf (external link)

http://www.imagesensor​s.org …%20Folkerts%20e​t%20al.pdf (external link)

Here is an article by the author of the IRIS astronomical imaging software about Nikon's hot pixel removal processing:
http://www.astrosurf.c​om/~buil/nikon_test/te​st.htm (external link)




  
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May 21, 2013 07:22 |  #10

Just used this basic method as written here...body cap on, live view for a few minutes, I was set at ISO1600, then went to manual sensor clean and left it on for 1-2 minutes, turn off....then I checked and found no hot pixels anymore on my 5d3.


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Stuck pixels in 5D3
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