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Thread started 07 May 2012 (Monday) 04:39
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60D Newbie question

 
viperbass
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May 07, 2012 04:39 |  #1

I have finally been out practicing with my new 60D.

Went to a local lake for some landscape work for my upcoming Grand Teton/Yellowstone vacation.

I tried to use the CA function, with a vivid setting but the pictures all came out washed out.

I want to get comfortable with the best settings for landscape shots. I don't necessarily want to use full auto. The pictures with the landscape setting - vivid ambience came out the best. I don't know why my CA pictures all came out as all washed out.

What is the best setting for Landscapes?




  
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Shutterwolf
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May 07, 2012 05:57 |  #2
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I love the AV setting myself. I only have the Xti for now, but I'm getting a 60D soon, and the AV mode should be very similar, if not the same. If you shoot in RAW, you have a chance of fixing a picture if its over exposed a bit. That is how I compensated for my shots of the water in Yosemite without a ND filter. They were a little bright, but I was able to fix it on photoshop with the RAW settings.


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xarqi
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May 07, 2012 06:03 |  #3

Best setting?
Shoot raw and worry about it later.

Post up one of your disappointing images and let's have a look.

When I see "washed out", that makes me think of flare and that makes me think of cheap filters. Could that be part of the issue?




  
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vinmunoz
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May 07, 2012 06:23 |  #4

Try to learn exposure using Manual Mode.

try this out. choose manual mode and practice exposure compensation using shutter speed, aperture and ISO.

http://camerasim.com/c​amera-simulator/ (external link)


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mike_311
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May 07, 2012 20:39 |  #5

you don't need full auto, Av or Tv will work almost all the time. teh only time i ever use full manual is when shooting at night (when i need an exposure longer than 30s) or when sing my flash since it isn't eTTL.

shoot RAW, learn it love it, don't throw all that extra information your sensor collects, at least shoot Raw + jpg so you can play with it yourself.

also for landscape shoot Av, use a tripod, set the iso at 100, set you aperture to whatever value you want, usually a value that will produce a very sharp result any lens is around f8.

let the camera do the rest...


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Preeb
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May 07, 2012 21:13 as a reply to  @ mike_311's post |  #6

What's CA? I use Av most of the time using exposure compensation if needed, M occasionally - Tv too, but not for landscapes. ISO set usually from 200 - 400. I have the style set at Neutral and do what's necessary in post to enhance anything which needs it. I prefer to have much of the control myself.

Oh, yeah I shoot RAW too.


Rick
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MingTyhMaa
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May 07, 2012 21:22 |  #7

Creative auto, a variation of Program.


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MingTyhMaa
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May 07, 2012 21:28 |  #8

There are no best settings, just your creative will. Don't make changes with creative auto.
Shoot raw and collect all the data so you have it for postprocessing. Focus on composition, and do most if not all your shooting at sunrise or sunset.


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bratkinson
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May 07, 2012 22:17 |  #9

I mostly shoot in Av mode these days. If the resulting LCD image looks too dark or too light, I adjust accordingly. When I shoot in M, I typically "started" in Av and after looking at the shutter speed/ISO the camera selected, start about the same place in M and take another shot. If it's not what I want, adjust again, shoot again, repeat as needed.

After 10 years, give or take, shooting nothing but JPG with a couple P&S and finally DSLR a year ago, I "graduated" to RAW+JPG in January. That gives me the option of JPG if I'm in a hurry to produce results, or RAW + Lightroom to do whatever I need to get it the way I want it.


"Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity." General George S Patton, Jr 1885-1945

  
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mike_311
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May 08, 2012 06:47 |  #10

also learn how to use the exposure meter. in manual mode you can tell pretty quickly if the image will come out before you shoot if the meter is in the middle and you can learn to slightly over or under expose your image.

then once you get that, learn to use the histogram.

the lcd preview is very deceiving.


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Preeb
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May 08, 2012 07:50 |  #11

mike_311 wrote in post #14397803 (external link)
also learn how to use the exposure meter. in manual mode you can tell pretty quickly if the image will come out before you shoot if the meter is in the middle and you can learn to slightly over or under expose your image.

then once you get that, learn to use the histogram.

the lcd preview is very deceiving.

As I understand it, the histogram is taken from the jpeg rendition too, so even that has to be taken into consideration if you are using anything other than a neutral setting. I chimp the histogram regularly, and my exposures have tended to be much better as a result.

Now if there was just a histogram for creative vision, I'd be all set. ;)


Rick
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mike_311
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May 08, 2012 08:31 |  #12

the thing with the histogram is it works phenomenal in RAW since you can usually tell if you have lost detail do to blown highlights or excessive shadow. when shooting Raw, the point is to capture as much information as possible and to give you the most flexibly in post processing. When you blow highlights or severely underexpose there is no detail to be found in those areas and you cant recreate it in post, but you can easily get rid of it or choose not to use it. this is why some people will choose to slightly overexpose dark scenes and under expose bright ones. this is easier to accomplish in Full Manual most since the camera inst trying to maintain and exposure setting you preset.

in manual mode you dial in your in Iso and either aperture or shutter speed, and then adjust either the aperture or shutter speed to slightly over/under or properly expose based on the meter reading. then just check the histogram after you shoot to make sure you got as much information as possible.

shooting in jpeg the camera decides what is important based on your settings and im not going to say it doesn't do a good job, but you lose total control of your final product.

you dont need to worry about WB and sharpness and color tones as the camera just saves what the sensor captures. you have total control over all that in post.

so get away from shooting jpg, shoot in either Tv or Av and get used to setting Iso and either the shutter or aperture to see how they affect the image and then use full manual when you need absolute total control, granted you ca do this in Av or Tv by setting the camera to over or underexpose but its much easier to dial it in in manual than to dig through the menus to set the exposure meter.


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mike_311
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May 08, 2012 08:45 |  #13

Preeb wrote in post #14397979 (external link)
As I understand it, the histogram is taken from the jpeg rendition too, so even that has to be taken into consideration if you are using anything other than a neutral setting. I chimp the histogram regularly, and my exposures have tended to be much better as a result.

that doesn't really matter, you just need to make sure you aren't clipping off highlights or dark's on either end and your jpegs setting wont affect that.


Canon 5d mkii | Canon 17-40/4L | Tamron 24-70/2.8 | Canon 85/1.8 | Canon 135/2L
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John ­ from ­ PA
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May 09, 2012 12:11 |  #14

viperbass, check your private email. I've responded about your questions




  
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60D Newbie question
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