Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 05 Jun 2012 (Tuesday) 15:29
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Why me, my sudden 5DmkII focusing issues

 
lukasgunar
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
309 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 6
Joined Mar 2007
Location: SLOVAKIA
     
Jun 06, 2012 13:30 |  #16

joeblack2022 wrote in post #14540474 (external link)
Have you been able to confirm the focus points that were active were the ones you selected?

Wondering if there was a glitch in the AF selection or something?

Hi Joel,
not sure I understand. When focusing I can clearly see in the viewfinder that focusing works. You won't notice anything wrong in the viewfinder and I confirm optics correction is set to 0 as I wear no glasses. How else would you like me to check it? Via DPP?
thank you for the hint


Sony A7RIII
Samyang 45 f/1.8, paired with Sigma converter: Canon 16-35 f/4L IS, Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II, Canon Speedlite 580EXII
stuff I owned for years until I moved to Sony world
Canon EOS 5D MkIV,Canon 17-40 f/4L, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM, Canon EF 50mm f/1.4, Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
MakisM1
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,654 posts
Gallery: 28 photos
Likes: 386
Joined Dec 2011
Location: Houston
     
Jun 06, 2012 13:34 |  #17

The points where you say you focused are not in the center of the image and you said you did not recompose.

Also, you used center point AF.


Gerry
Canon 5D MkIII/Canon 60D/Canon EF-S 18-200/Canon EF 24-70L USM II/Canon EF 70-200L 2.8 USM II/Canon EF 50 f1.8 II/Σ 8-16/ 430 EXII
OS: Linux Ubuntu/PostProcessing: Darktable/Image Processing: GIMP

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
joeblack2022
Goldmember
3,005 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Sep 2011
Location: The Great White North
     
Jun 06, 2012 13:45 |  #18

lukasgunar wrote in post #14540527 (external link)
Hi Joel,
not sure I understand. When focusing I can clearly see in the viewfinder that focusing works. You won't notice anything wrong in the viewfinder and I confirm optics correction is set to 0 as I wear no glasses. How else would you like me to check it? Via DPP?
thank you for the hint

Yes if you open up the images in DPP you should be able to see what focus point was selected for each shot.

MakisM1 wrote in post #14540548 (external link)
The points where you say you focused are not in the center of the image and you said you did not recompose.

Also, you used center point AF.

Did you use only center point or did you select points as needed without recomposing?


Joel

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
lukasgunar
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
309 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 6
Joined Mar 2007
Location: SLOVAKIA
     
Jun 06, 2012 13:51 |  #19

MakisM1 wrote in post #14540548 (external link)
The points where you say you focused are not in the center of the image and you said you did not recompose.

Also, you used center point AF.

Gerry,
pictures were cropped for you guys while I tried cropping the way that would give a sense to observe possible front or back-focus.
I used only center AF point without recomposing.
thank you


Sony A7RIII
Samyang 45 f/1.8, paired with Sigma converter: Canon 16-35 f/4L IS, Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II, Canon Speedlite 580EXII
stuff I owned for years until I moved to Sony world
Canon EOS 5D MkIV,Canon 17-40 f/4L, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM, Canon EF 50mm f/1.4, Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
cfcRebel
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,252 posts
Joined Feb 2005
Location: Austin, TX
     
Jun 06, 2012 14:17 |  #20

I can tell the differences between these two batches of images. It's hard to believe they were taken with the same camera and lens, by the same user. I said that because, the 2nd batch showed less defined edges (on the subject in focus) and the noise in general is much worse than the 1st batch. What i can't tell is, the camera settings that could have contributed to the sudden degradation. If you choose to send the 5D2 in for repair, enclose these samples and I'm sure the Canon guys would agree that your 5D2 needs some tune-up.
I'm sorry man.


Fee

Canon | SIGMA | TAMRON | Kenko | Amvona

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
lyttleviet
Senior Member
537 posts
Joined Dec 2008
     
Jun 06, 2012 14:57 |  #21

I'd say handheld @ 200mm during a wedding with those SS would contribute to a lot of blurry images. The MKII is fine utilizing ISO1600 normally so it could be your camera but I'd definitely watch your SS especially during weddings where you are moving quite a bit as is the subject.


www.opulentphotography​.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
lukasgunar
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
309 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 6
Joined Mar 2007
Location: SLOVAKIA
     
Jun 06, 2012 16:41 |  #22

lyttleviet wrote in post #14540969 (external link)
I'd say handheld @ 200mm during a wedding with those SS would contribute to a lot of blurry images. The MKII is fine utilizing ISO1600 normally so it could be your camera but I'd definitely watch your SS especially during weddings where you are moving quite a bit as is the subject.

Hey mate,
as can be seen on the pics attached, those are not from the wedding and focus is somewhere just not where it should be. I have many pictures from the wedding where my subjects are either standing or sitting in the church, at home etc., literally posing me so no movement of my subjects and the result is quite bad.
I would truly narrow it down to a camera problem and my question would be whether I have any other option than sending it to Canon for fixing. How about some reset or microadjustment? I am afraid it won't help but raising a question does not cost me anything so if there is any other option I am eager to hear it.
Thank you all!


Sony A7RIII
Samyang 45 f/1.8, paired with Sigma converter: Canon 16-35 f/4L IS, Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II, Canon Speedlite 580EXII
stuff I owned for years until I moved to Sony world
Canon EOS 5D MkIV,Canon 17-40 f/4L, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM, Canon EF 50mm f/1.4, Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
MakisM1
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,654 posts
Gallery: 28 photos
Likes: 386
Joined Dec 2011
Location: Houston
     
Jun 06, 2012 17:13 |  #23

The reason I looked for the center points is that the area in the center which the AF system is using, is larger than the center square shown in the screen. Within that area the AF is using, the most contrasty thing wins.

I had similar problems with ONE lens (my old 35-70) and I found that in most cases of mis-focus, I was shooting one thing, but immediately next to it was a higher contrast thing in a different distance. Very similar to your tree photo.

If these are crops, then it is highly likely that my scenario doesn't hold.

Good luck!


Gerry
Canon 5D MkIII/Canon 60D/Canon EF-S 18-200/Canon EF 24-70L USM II/Canon EF 70-200L 2.8 USM II/Canon EF 50 f1.8 II/Σ 8-16/ 430 EXII
OS: Linux Ubuntu/PostProcessing: Darktable/Image Processing: GIMP

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JakAHearts
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,742 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Likes: 1501
Joined Sep 2010
Location: Silver Spring, MD
     
Jun 06, 2012 17:27 |  #24

The images look fine to me. Dont forget that the DOF is CRAZY thin at 200mm and 2.8. Even more so when youre doign "macro" shots. Additionally, you are shooting downward on the leaves and small sticks. The focus plane is the pitches away from you, making the DOF seem even thinner. Post some real shots under better conditions.


Shane
flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
lukasgunar
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
309 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 6
Joined Mar 2007
Location: SLOVAKIA
     
Jun 07, 2012 10:35 |  #25

JakAHearts wrote in post #14541614 (external link)
The images look fine to me. Dont forget that the DOF is CRAZY thin at 200mm and 2.8. Even more so when youre doign "macro" shots. Additionally, you are shooting downward on the leaves and small sticks. The focus plane is the pitches away from you, making the DOF seem even thinner. Post some real shots under better conditions.

Cheers mate.
I do not disagree with you but to give you an idea how my current pictures look like you can take [URL="http://s149.phot​obucket.com/albums/s43​/lukasgunar/Focusing%2​0issues/?action=view&c​urrent=WRONGfocus_MG_5​442.jpg"]Bad focus no.1 as reference and that one is certainly not macro. When you check the picture OK focus no. 2 that was taken at 200mm or OK focus no. 1 or 3 were also taken near 200mm and all are looking like from different planet.
In any case if you believe that it would be useful to post more pictures, let me know and I will surely post additional ones.
Thank you for your time and feedback.


Sony A7RIII
Samyang 45 f/1.8, paired with Sigma converter: Canon 16-35 f/4L IS, Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II, Canon Speedlite 580EXII
stuff I owned for years until I moved to Sony world
Canon EOS 5D MkIV,Canon 17-40 f/4L, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM, Canon EF 50mm f/1.4, Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
amfoto1
Cream of the Crop
10,254 posts
Likes: 85
Joined Aug 2007
Location: San Jose, California
     
Jun 07, 2012 11:34 |  #26

With higher ISO there is some loss of micro detail which can appear to be softening, but is just the nature of the beast. Noise reduction also robs some fine detail. I notice that all your "BAD FOCUS" shots are higher ISOs.

BAD FOCUS 1 appears possibly to be camrea shake. It also could be that Image Stabilization was working but hadn't fully stabilized the image yet, at the very moment of exposure. That does happen and there can be a small number of shots ruined by IS, especially if you "shoot too fast" with it. Is this your first IS lens? Also, this could be subject movement. IS cannot help with subject movement. 1/80 is bordering on "risky", when shooting people.

BAD FOCUS 2 is an extremely difficult to focus subject. Actually the results look pretty darned good to me. The leaves on the left appear to be on the same plane as the tree on which you focused, so I'd expect them to be in focus too. In the sample image, the tree on which you focused appears pretty correctly focused.

BAD FOCUS 3 and 4 are dead on, focused right where you put the point of focus. I don't see any problem wiht them.

Do you ever shoot other than f2.8? Practically any lens will improve closed down one or two stops, even the 70-200 II, which is a great lens wide open.

Underexposure, then amping the image up in post production also adds noise and loses fine detail, adding to appearance of softness.

Different images need different sharpening during post-processing... depending upon subject matter, ISO used, size and type of final use, and more.

I would spend more time with the lens, work with it and see if it doesn't improve.

Also try making some prints on smooth, matte paper. That will tell you a lot more than your computer monitor. It can be a very big difference, in fact. Sometimes the resolution of an image just doesn't seem to match up well with the resolution of a computer monitor, I think. I'm using a calibrated, graphics quality monitor to view your images.

I don't hesitate to use my 5DII at ISO 6400 and find it excellent from 3200 and lower. But, of course, a lot of that's down to personal preferences.... what's acceptible, usable to me might not be to you, and vice versa.

Finally, do you have a filter on the lens? If so, you might try without it. Some small degree of softness or focus error can be caused by a filter... even a good one. Different lenses respond differently to filters. I don't use the 70-200 Mark II so can't say about that particular lens... but the EF 100-400mm, for example, really doesn't like filters. Telephotos usually are more forgiving than wide lenses, but you never can tell. Also, do you use the lens hood? Oblique light striking the front of a lens sometimes seems to cause focus errors or image softness. And, when using a filter it's even more important to also use a lens hood, to keep oblique light off the filter as best possible.


Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JakAHearts
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,742 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Likes: 1501
Joined Sep 2010
Location: Silver Spring, MD
     
Jun 07, 2012 12:34 |  #27

I agree 100% with what is above. I just didnt have the time to type it all out. :D

The IS comment in the first one has bit me a few times. If you focus and recompose quickly, the IS sometimes makes a soft image while it tries to compensate.


Shane
flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
joeblack2022
Goldmember
3,005 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Sep 2011
Location: The Great White North
     
Jun 07, 2012 14:10 |  #28

JakAHearts wrote in post #14545435 (external link)
The IS comment in the first one has bit me a few times. If you focus and recompose quickly, the IS sometimes makes a soft image while it tries to compensate.

I think the OP mentioned he was using back-button focusing (he said he was focusing with his thumb?) - unless I'm mistaken, IS is only engaged when the shutter is half-pressed?


Joel

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
cfcRebel
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,252 posts
Joined Feb 2005
Location: Austin, TX
     
Jun 07, 2012 14:32 |  #29

In the big picture, the OP has not changed his shooting habit/behavior drastically but the results from this wedding and the results that he got before that day, are very different in terms of image quality. This post is certainly NOT one of those "Just bought a 5D2, is it sharp?" posts.


Fee

Canon | SIGMA | TAMRON | Kenko | Amvona

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tzalman
Fatal attraction.
Avatar
13,491 posts
Likes: 205
Joined Apr 2005
Location: Gesher Haziv, Israel
     
Jun 07, 2012 15:01 |  #30

joeblack2022 wrote in post #14545884 (external link)
I think the OP mentioned he was using back-button focusing (he said he was focusing with his thumb?) - unless I'm mistaken, IS is only engaged when the shutter is half-pressed?

You are mistaken.


Elie / אלי

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

5,983 views & 0 likes for this thread
Why me, my sudden 5DmkII focusing issues
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is rup_95
725 guests, 205 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.