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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 21 Aug 2012 (Tuesday) 21:03
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Teton/Yellowstone lenses...

 
Don ­ Madson
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Aug 21, 2012 21:03 |  #1

Heading to Jackson for the first time in 3 weeks. Planning on 3 lenses, 10-20 for the wide shots, and a choice for mid-range and longer shots. I'll either take my 17-70 OS or the 24-105L, and either the 70-200L or the 100-400L.

Do I really NEED the 100-400 for wildlife/scenics-at-a-distance, or will the 70-200L be fine? My choice of the long lens will dictate which of the mid-range lenses go. They'll all be on my 7D...

Thanks!
Don


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WaterVsAnchor
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Aug 21, 2012 21:09 |  #2

When I was in Teton/Yellowstone a few years ago, the best wildlife shots were out of my reach. I'd take your longest lens, for sure. Wolves and bears were always far out. Missed shots of a wolf pack taking down an elk because I didn't have nearly enough reach.


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-Sam- | FUJI X-E2 | Fuji 35 1.4 | Fuji 18-55 2.8-4 | Rokinon 12 2

  
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Laramie
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Aug 21, 2012 21:16 |  #3

I've lived in MT and been to Tetons/YNP numerous times.

10-20
24-105
100-400

That being said, unless you've done some scouting, or just struck with dumb luck and something other than elk/bison fall in your lap, the 400 won't be long enough, so you'll be cropping in post.


5DIII | 40D | 17-40 f4L | Tamron 28-75 2.8 | 50 1.4 | 70-200 2.8L | Oly Zuiko 50 macro | Tamron 1.4x

  
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Don ­ Madson
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Aug 21, 2012 21:29 |  #4

Thanks, Guys! I figured that the long lens would be needed, just needed a little verification. Cropping in post is expected, but I also hope for a bit of local info to help me get some closer encounters.

Regards!
Don


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Nature ­ Nut
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Aug 21, 2012 21:31 |  #5

Def the 100-400, I got great shots at long range. Even with 400 some cropping was needed.

Stick to the Northern roads and areas for most wildlife, Hit the Tetons for Moose.


Adam - Upstate NY:

  
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Don ­ Madson
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Aug 21, 2012 21:38 |  #6

Thanks, Adam.

Regards!
Don


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dbricks
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Aug 21, 2012 22:13 |  #7

Definitely take the 100-400. I rented it last summer for my trip to Yellowstone and it was a great lens. Enjoy your trip!


Canon 7D | Rebel T2i | Sigma 17-50 2.8 OS | Tamron 70-200 2.8 | Canon 100-400L
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Don ­ Madson
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Aug 21, 2012 22:20 |  #8

Thanks, dbricks!

Guess it's settled, then!

Regards!
Don


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T'ai Chi Ch'uan...Relaxation, with an attitude!
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WaterVsAnchor
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Aug 21, 2012 22:36 |  #9

I had the best luck with grizzlies on the road to the northeast entrance. Get up there early, never saw any past around 9 am. The south side of the road is a fairly wide open valley/grassland area with some tree cover and a stream. I was never able to get any good pictures, as I said before, but had some cool sites with my binoculars. The wolf pack that I saw was also near that area as well, can't remember exactly where but do remember a large canyon up towards that direction. As Nature Nut said, Tetons are a must for moose. We stayed in Teton as I think the nature views are better there, but other than elk and a few moose, had much better luck with wildlife in Yellowstone.


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rklepper
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Aug 21, 2012 22:39 |  #10

I just got back from there. Always had my 17-55 on one 7D and my 70-300 on a second. Used them both equally. I used my 10-22 enough times to may it worth taking with me. My only wish was that sometimes the 70-300 was a little longer.


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Laramie
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Aug 21, 2012 22:40 |  #11

WaterVsAnchor wrote in post #14890003 (external link)
I had the best luck with grizzlies on the road to the northeast entrance. Get up there early, never saw any past around 9 am.

That's where I've seen the best activity as well. 212 just west of Lamar Valley.


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RodneyCyr
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Aug 21, 2012 22:48 as a reply to  @ Laramie's post |  #12

Take the longest (and shortest) lenses you can get your hands on. I visited Yellowstone a few years ago and used mostly my 10-22 for shots of the geysers, with my 17-85IS also useful. But my 70-300IS wasn't nearly long enough for wildlife. A 100-400L would still not have been long enough. Consider a teleconverter.

I am going back next summer with the same kit, except that my 300D has been replaced with a 60D and 30D, and my 17-85 with a 15-85.


Canon 80D, 60D, Canon 10-22EFs, 15-85EFS IS, Sigma 18-300, Canon 60mm EFs Macro, Rokinon 8mm fisheye, 550EX flash, Olympus TG2 underwater P&S
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Don ­ Madson
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Aug 21, 2012 22:54 as a reply to  @ RodneyCyr's post |  #13

Thanks again, Sam, Doc, Laramie, and all the rest. I wasn't planning on taking the extender, but I guess I will.

I'm looking forward to the trip. I grew up in Colorado (Littleton) but never had the time/money to get to Jackson until now!

Unsubscribing from the thread...


dmadson.photoreflect.c​om
T'ai Chi Ch'uan...Relaxation, with an attitude!
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Scott ­ M
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Aug 22, 2012 06:47 |  #14

Definitely take the 100-400L. You can never have too much reach for Yellowstone. Even 400mm on a crop body will be too short at times, especially in Lamar Valley and Hayden Valley.

I would take both camera bodies, too. Leave the 100-400L on the 7D, and 17-70 OS on the 50D. You will want to have your telephoto mounted on a body as you drive around the park, as you will come across lots of wildlife. Having two bodies will save you lots of lens changes, as you can use the 17-70/50D combo for your landscape shots. If you take a single body, you'll be changing from your 100-400L to the 17-70 every time you want to stop for a landscape shot. Remember -- a mountain or waterfall will wait for you to change lenses, but a grizzly bear or wolf will not.

I have been to Yellowstone five times. Like Rodney, about the only time I ever use an UWA lens -- EFS 10-22mm in my case -- is in the geyser basins. Even then, I find 17mm on a crop wide enough for almost all of those shots, too.


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Mike55
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Aug 23, 2012 18:26 |  #15

Don Madson wrote in post #14889698 (external link)
Heading to Jackson for the first time in 3 weeks. Planning on 3 lenses, 10-20 for the wide shots, and a choice for mid-range and longer shots. I'll either take my 17-70 OS or the 24-105L, and either the 70-200L or the 100-400L.

Do I really NEED the 100-400 for wildlife/scenics-at-a-distance, or will the 70-200L be fine? My choice of the long lens will dictate which of the mid-range lenses go. They'll all be on my 7D...

Thanks!
Don


10-20/24-105/100-400.

That's it. You'll use the 100-400 mostly for wildlife, which will be plentiful. The 24-105 also has very high potential for animalscapes. The 10-20 is more useful for the geothermal features, when you're *inside* the forests, and when traveling along river canyons. The 10-20 is not so useful in front of the Tetons, nor in the lodgepole pine meadows of Yellowstone.

The 70-200 is a "no mans land" lens in Yellowstone and Grand Teton. Not really long enough for most wildlife, and not wide enough for most landscapes.


6D | 70D | 24-105 L IS | 17-40 L | 300 F4 L IS | 50 1.8 II | 1.4x II | LR5 | HV30 | bug spray | wilderness
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Teton/Yellowstone lenses...
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