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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 09 Sep 2012 (Sunday) 15:20
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Humming bird shot

 
arcgang
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Sep 09, 2012 15:20 |  #1

Plz criticize this humming bird shot.

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8322/7948601758_c4f22e1b28_b.jpg

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Gear list : Canon eos 60d, t2i, canon 50mm f1.8, canon 18-200mm, sigma 10-20mm f3.5, canon 100mm f2.8 L, canon 100-400mm L

  
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Titus213
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Sep 09, 2012 15:32 |  #2

The hummer is doing what he's supposed to do so not criticism there.

And it would appear you and your camera are too. Nice capture! Color, framing, focus all appear to be excellent.


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mannetti21
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Sep 09, 2012 15:32 |  #3

Fantastic! Great colors in the bokeh. Only thing I might consider doing is cropping a little off the top of the frame.


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Randy ­ Digby
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Sep 09, 2012 16:23 |  #4

Good capture. They are really hard to focus on in mid-air when not at a feeding station where you can pre-focus.


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arcgang
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Sep 09, 2012 20:18 as a reply to  @ Randy Digby's post |  #5

Thank you all for your feedback and appreciation.


'Lenses fill my senses'
Gear list : Canon eos 60d, t2i, canon 50mm f1.8, canon 18-200mm, sigma 10-20mm f3.5, canon 100mm f2.8 L, canon 100-400mm L

  
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Tom ­ Reichner
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Sep 09, 2012 21:37 |  #6

One guideline that often works, if followed;
The subject should be brighter than the background.

Not that this is a hard and fast "rule", but in most situations, it works best for most subjects.

In this case, I see the reverse. There is some lovely, light pastel color here. Unfortunately, the subject, the hummingbird itself, appears dull and dark in comparison. It would have been helpful if more light could have been on the hummer itself, so that it would not be "shown up" by it's surroundings.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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arcgang
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Sep 09, 2012 22:14 |  #7

Tom Reichner wrote in post #14969765 (external link)
One guideline that often works, if followed;
The subject should be brighter than the background.

Not that this is a hard and fast "rule", but in most situations, it works best for most subjects.

In this case, I see the reverse. There is some lovely, light pastel color here. Unfortunately, the subject, the hummingbird itself, appears dull and dark in comparison. It would have been helpful if more light could have been on the hummer itself, so that it would not be "shown up" by it's surroundings.

Thanks so much Tom for your valuable tip.

I felt the same..wish that I had the hummer brighter, more focussed.

Can you tell me what technique I could have applied to bring that effect, that is, good light on the subject+good background.

I used canon 60d and 100-400mm L, no flash. The exifs are :

Exposure 0.006 sec (1/180)
Aperture f/5.6
Focal Length 400 mm
ISO Speed 250
Exposure Bias 0 EV


'Lenses fill my senses'
Gear list : Canon eos 60d, t2i, canon 50mm f1.8, canon 18-200mm, sigma 10-20mm f3.5, canon 100mm f2.8 L, canon 100-400mm L

  
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Tom ­ Reichner
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Sep 10, 2012 01:48 |  #8

Plan to shoot in the direction in which the light is falling evenly across the hummingbird.

I see light on the front of the hummer's forehead. Based on that, I would assume that at that time of day, the sunlight was coming from your right. If you could set up so that the sun was at your back when aiming at the hummingbird, you would have a nicely illuminated hummingbird.

Repositioning your feeder (assuming you are using a hummingbird feeder) will help to direct the hummers to the right spot. If you still want the same background, then move the feeder so that it is in line between the nice background and the sun. Then, put yourself along this same line, between the feeder and the sun.

When the background, the hummingbird, your camera, and the sun are all in a line . . . that's when you get the images you are looking for!


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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abbypanda
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Sep 10, 2012 01:51 |  #9

Love the coloring but do agree lighten the bird a bit. The background colors are very unique and a good variety from the typical hummer shot! Pretty bird too




  
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arcgang
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Sep 10, 2012 02:05 |  #10

Tom Reichner wrote in post #14970478 (external link)
Plan to shoot in the direction in which the light is falling evenly across the hummingbird.

I see light on the front of the hummer's forehead. Based on that, I would assume that at that time of day, the sunlight was coming from your right. If you could set up so that the sun was at your back when aiming at the hummingbird, you would have a nicely illuminated hummingbird.

Repositioning your feeder (assuming you are using a hummingbird feeder) will help to direct the hummers to the right spot. If you still want the same background, then move the feeder so that it is in line between the nice background and the sun. Then, put yourself along this same line, between the feeder and the sun.

When the background, the hummingbird, your camera, and the sun are all in a line . . . that's when you get the images you are looking for!

Thanks again for the tip.

I do not have a feeder actually. This was taken when I was in Pebble beach, Carmel, CA during the labor weekend. It was taken at a parking lot when I was about to pack off and leave. I waited and waited to capture a clear shot. This was one of those accidental ones when I was firing at high speed.


'Lenses fill my senses'
Gear list : Canon eos 60d, t2i, canon 50mm f1.8, canon 18-200mm, sigma 10-20mm f3.5, canon 100mm f2.8 L, canon 100-400mm L

  
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JimMcrae
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Sep 10, 2012 04:34 |  #11

Totally agree with Tom. In situations like this when you just come across the bird - can't set up how you'd like - you can try bumping up the exposure compensation to lighten the bird whilst trying not to blow out the background. Alternatively, use fill flash - off camera it it's too far away - to compensate. The built in wireless thingy on the 60d is great for that so you just need the one speedlight.

Still a very nice shot though!


60d, 400d, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6, 24-105mm f/4, 50mm f/1.4, 580ex II, 2 X 430ex II, Bowens 500, cs5

  
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Humming bird shot
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