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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Weddings & Other Family Events Talk 
Thread started 11 Nov 2012 (Sunday) 20:02
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Workflow for quicker edits?

 
pstyle1
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Nov 11, 2012 20:02 |  #1

Sorry if this is the wrong forum for this, but figured this is where I find most of the wedding photographers.

Just wanted to hear what your workflow looks like when editing a full wedding day.
I find that it takes me a very long time.

Now, I'm not an experienced wedding photographer and have only done a couple.
To give an idea of my current work flow:

My last wedding I shot a total of 1300 photos.
Brought all of them into LR4.
Created subfolders for getting ready shots, details, ceremony etc etc...
Go into the folders and start deleting (from LR4, not disk), leaving only the shots I want to use.
I do some basic adjustments and sync them to all photos in folder.
After the I start editing each photo individually... exposure, spot, brushes etc.

I've found that this takes a long time... especially weeding the bad photos out and editing each individual photo. Most of the brushes I use are presets but I also adjust the presents sometimes.

Anyway just want to hear some tips from you guys on how to speed things up when editing 1000+ photos. And how long does it normally take you to edit a whole wedding?


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awad
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Nov 11, 2012 21:11 |  #2

On import into LR4, I apply a base import setting that gets my photos to about 80% of where I want them.

After Import, I go through in grid mode with thumbnails set so i have 5-6 photos per row. I give everything a 1 star rating that is worth keeping. That usually gets me to around 1400 or so. I then go through each picture quickly and zero out anything that has a bad facial expression or any other issue. That usually gets me to the 1000 mark.

Then I commence with the color correcting aspect of it.

Finally, I organize the proof set in a custom order to make the timeline make more sense. Separate the bride and groom prep, then the ceremony details, then ceremony, portraits, reception details, reception, portraits again if necessary, and then photobooth. Then I rename and export.

From start (around 3000 images) to finish (700-1000) images takes me around 5 hours.


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umphotography
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Nov 11, 2012 21:27 |  #3

awad wrote in post #15234864 (external link)
On import into LR4, I apply a base import setting that gets my photos to about 80% of where I want them.

After Import, I go through in grid mode with thumbnails set so i have 5-6 photos per row. I give everything a 1 star rating that is worth keeping. That usually gets me to around 1400 or so. I then go through each picture quickly and zero out anything that has a bad facial expression or any other issue. That usually gets me to the 1000 mark.

Then I commence with the color correcting aspect of it.

Finally, I organize the proof set in a custom order to make the timeline make more sense. Separate the bride and groom prep, then the ceremony details, then ceremony, portraits, reception details, reception, portraits again if necessary, and then photobooth. Then I rename and export.

From start (around 3000 images) to finish (700-1000) images takes me around 5 hours.


Awad

Is that what you present to the client,,700-1000 ?? The reason i ask is because B/t my wife and i we usually capture 1400-1800 at a wedding. By the time i cull, its not uncommon to have 1200-1300 usable shots. At receptions we take a lot of couples shots at the tables so that pops up the count, but, the clients like that. But i still feel like we present too many. Clients are not complaining but we do get, wow there were a lot of pictures. Im constantly surprised that what i would want to toss, brides will use. So, i hate to not present the files. My opinion has been, let them make the call so i give them all the usable files.

Agree with your flow in LR. We do the same thing. But 1400 files takes me about 8-10 hrs,,,,,would love to cut that down to 5-6 like your doing. Thats why I asked.


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Christopher ­ Steven ­ b
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Nov 11, 2012 21:44 |  #4

For a 7-hour wedding (standard for me) I shoot maximum 1100 and return about 350. I've never had complaints that there weren't enough photos. And I should add: while in the process of shooting the day, I've never received a glare that suggested I was, er, perhaps shooting too much.

My process is roughly as follows:
1) import into LR
2) move through images 1 by 1, ***-ing good candidates for shots to return (when dealing with 2 or 3 similar, I might *** those similar shots, deferring judgment until later
3) I show only the ***, process batches when they're in similar light, situations; I'll do local editing where required as I move through 1 by 1.
4) I don't separate into different groups (getting ready, ceremony etc.). I just export as is.
5) touchups in photoshop of the large res (3500px)
6) rename images to 'wedding - 001' etc.
7) I load these jpgs into LR and export a 'web' size set which I include in another folder on the disc.

Processing a standard wedding takes probably 12 ish hours. I usually complete this over 3 days, though in a pinch I could do it in 2.



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awad
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Nov 11, 2012 22:07 |  #5

umphotography wrote in post #15234902 (external link)
Awad

Is that what you present to the client,,700-1000 ?? The reason i ask is because B/t my wife and i we usually capture 1400-1800 at a wedding. By the time i cull, its not uncommon to have 1200-1300 usable shots. At receptions we take a lot of couples shots at the tables so that pops up the count, but, the clients like that. But i still feel like we present too many. Clients are not complaining but we do get, wow there were a lot of pictures. Im constantly surprised that what i would want to toss, brides will use. So, i hate to not present the files. My opinion has been, let them make the call so i give them all the usable files.

Agree with your flow in LR. We do the same thing. But 1400 files takes me about 8-10 hrs,,,,,would love to cut that down to 5-6 like your doing. Thats why I asked.

yeah, we give around 7-800 for the proof set, then if they get a photobooth that's where the extra files come in.

I also do my best to not take table shots, If the bride tells me she wants a shot of her and every table, I'll discount the photobooth and transition them to that. I can't stand doing table shots.

We used to give 12-1500 per wedding. So I know where you're coming from. We were finding that the really good photos were starting to get lost in the sheer number. You gotta learn to make the call to sacrifice some of the OK shots to make the great ones look that much better.

No matter what, The photo you hate the most will almost always be the one the brides pick. The general public is terrible at knowing what is good, It's our job to educate them and do the editing for them. So if there's a shot you want to cut, definitely cut it. The bride won't usually miss it.

I spent the last 5 years as the head color corrector at a digital post production lab. So I would spend 8 hours a day editing wedding proof sets down for other photographers. So i've seen photographers give 1800-2000 image proof sets, and I've seen them give 2-300 image proof sets. You just gotta find the number that works for your studio and your brides.

Man I typed a lot. Sorry if I rambled.


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awad
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Nov 11, 2012 22:08 |  #6

Christopher Steven b wrote in post #15234961 (external link)
For a 7-hour wedding (standard for me) I shoot maximum 1100 and return about 350. I've never had complaints that there weren't enough photos. And I should add: while in the process of shooting the day, I've never received a glare that suggested I was, er, perhaps shooting too much.

My process is roughly as follows:
1) import into LR
2) move through images 1 by 1, ***-ing good candidates for shots to return (when dealing with 2 or 3 similar, I might *** those similar shots, deferring judgment until later
3) I show only the ***, process batches when they're in similar light, situations; I'll do local editing where required as I move through 1 by 1.
4) I don't separate into different groups (getting ready, ceremony etc.). I just export as is.
5) touchups in photoshop of the large res (3500px)
6) rename images to 'wedding - 001' etc.
7) I load these jpgs into LR and export a 'web' size set which I include in another folder on the disc.

Processing a standard wedding takes probably 12 ish hours. I usually complete this over 3 days, though in a pinch I could do it in 2.

I do a similar rating scheme.

* = proof set.
** = B/W candidates
***= Problem images where i'd have to swap faces or the such.
****= nothin.
***** = the best. Blog images or artistic edits.


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RangersForever
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Nov 12, 2012 00:42 |  #7

1. Move files onto computer and put under subfolder 2012-> Weddings -> "X & Y Wedding"
2. Back up "X & Y Wedding" RAW files onto external hard drive x 2.
3. Import "X & Y Wedding" into LR4.
4. Initial cull of bad images (delete from LR4 and disk with one click!)
5. Go through remaining images and post process.
6. Export to desktop folder "X & Y Wedding Photographs" and split into sub folders for separate times of the day.

Done!


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tim
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Nov 12, 2012 01:22 |  #8

My wedding workflow's a sticky at the top of this forum, and here. You can do the same thing in any editing program, LR, C1, etc.


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Steve ­ of ­ Cornubia
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Nov 12, 2012 02:15 |  #9

I use a Mac. First I view every RAW shot in Preview, which is quick and dirty. One finger hovers over 'Delete' as I run through. On the first pass, I cull all really bad shots, i.e. OOF. Then another pass where I look at composition and the finer details. Even so, this second pass is done fairly quickly. For a wedding, I would expect to have around 600 - 800 'promising' shots after the culling process.

I then commence processing in ACR, where I do 95% of my work. In the course of attempting to optimise each shot, I often delete a fair number at this stage because, having spent a little more time looking at them critically, I find I don't like a particular shot.

My processing is 90% about colour and exposure optimisation, plus sharpening, with a few moments spent cropping where it is necessary. Then I open each image in PS, where I dodge, burn or clone out stuff I don't want. The file is then saved as a JPEG. I do not change file names at this stage.

Then I rename all files as a batch using DPP (coz I don't know how to do it in PS and it's really easy in DPP) before creating a copy of the portfolio in low-res for sharing, again as a batch processing job.Obviously, my work is not high-end stuff at this stage and so I do not set out to do anything fancy with my processing, save for a vignette here and there. It would be unusual for me to spend more than five minutes on one shot - in total.

And that's it. Generally, I would spend around four hours to produce 300 or so images ready for the client.


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Peacefield
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Nov 12, 2012 06:49 |  #10

umphotography wrote in post #15234902 (external link)
Awad

Is that what you present to the client,,700-1000 ?? The reason i ask is because B/t my wife and i we usually capture 1400-1800 at a wedding. By the time i cull, its not uncommon to have 1200-1300 usable shots. At receptions we take a lot of couples shots at the tables so that pops up the count, but, the clients like that. But i still feel like we present too many. Clients are not complaining but we do get, wow there were a lot of pictures. Im constantly surprised that what i would want to toss, brides will use. So, i hate to not present the files. My opinion has been, let them make the call so i give them all the usable files.

Agree with your flow in LR. We do the same thing. But 1400 files takes me about 8-10 hrs,,,,,would love to cut that down to 5-6 like your doing. Thats why I asked.

I have the same issue, though I no longer view it as a problem. Yes, it's a lot of images, but the clients view it as positive and not negative value. Because I deliver so many, I also create a slideshow (Zenfolio) of ~200 so they can see what the "story of their day in my photos" can look like as well as allow some of my best images to shine through.

I try to make as few passes through a set of images as possible. I don't do an initial purge, I don't rate, I don't sync and adjust, etc. I import them all and I work through them one at a time in the Develop module. There I delete shots that are not worth keeping. I have just a couple of presets that get me most of what I want (saturation bump, soft vinette, etc.); one for high ISO and one for low ISO. From there, it's just a little tweaking as I work through each one at a time.

B&W and other things are a special pass for me; I scan through the final exported images for ones I'd like to do more with and bring them into Tiffen's DFX which I prefer to use over LR for these looks.


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umphotography
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Nov 12, 2012 08:04 |  #11

awad wrote in post #15235032 (external link)
yeah, we give around 7-800 for the proof set, then if they get a photobooth that's where the extra files come in.

I also do my best to not take table shots, If the bride tells me she wants a shot of her and every table, I'll discount the photobooth and transition them to that. I can't stand doing table shots.

We used to give 12-1500 per wedding. So I know where you're coming from. We were finding that the really good photos were starting to get lost in the sheer number. You gotta learn to make the call to sacrifice some of the OK shots to make the great ones look that much better.

No matter what, The photo you hate the most will almost always be the one the brides pick. The general public is terrible at knowing what is good, It's our job to educate them and do the editing for them. So if there's a shot you want to cut, definitely cut it. The bride won't usually miss it.

I spent the last 5 years as the head color corrector at a digital post production lab. So I would spend 8 hours a day editing wedding proof sets down for other photographers. So i've seen photographers give 1800-2000 image proof sets, and I've seen them give 2-300 image proof sets. You just gotta find the number that works for your studio and your brides.

Man I typed a lot. Sorry if I rambled.

Thank you sir. Appreciate your response. Peacefield,, same thing. Ive been taking some of the duplicate shots and turning one black and white and others with some LR presets that i have set up so the girls get them back with different colors looks. The feedback has been very positive. Also breaks the big file count up and easier to go through. Really think im going to back the Present disc down to 7-900. Awad, thanks for the post.


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highway0691
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Nov 14, 2012 08:27 |  #12

- Dump all photos into one folder
- In Bridge have them ordered to time taken -chronological order
- In Bridge rename all files numerically
- In ACR preview each file and delete/cull ruthlessly, from 1000 keep around 350.
- Then edit in ACR.
- In Bridge rename numerically the jpegs in chronological order.

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Nov 15, 2012 10:27 |  #13

Photomechanic has been a GODSEND for our workflow in terms of culling. It's way faster than lightroom in this respect. I always choose my photos there, and then bring it into LR4 for the adjustments.


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tim
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Nov 15, 2012 21:04 |  #14

PM or Fast Picture Viewer are both great culling tools. PM does more, but costs more. FPV does a few other things but it's primarily (for me) a super fast culling tool.


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matdivad
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Nov 17, 2012 13:56 |  #15

I like to organize my photos on the day of the shoot. I'll create folders for getting ready, ceremony, formals, groups, reception, and etc in each camera first.

When I get home, I'll import with Bridge and rename the folders respectively and group them by camera.

Next, I'll create a new cat in LR4 and import. The rest is pretty much the same as everyone else. Cull, edit, export low res and full res versions.

I usually end up with about 4-500 photos to submit to clients.


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Workflow for quicker edits?
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