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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 28 Nov 2012 (Wednesday) 09:05
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Old Digital Rebel 300D

 
eiram21
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Nov 30, 2012 08:13 |  #31

BigAl007 wrote in post #15307357 (external link)
Marie like all things you need to learn the techniques. At least with panning you are standing still. The other trick I learnt early on for that sort of work is that focal length is everything. For example if you can add a bit more length you can stand further back. At an airshow for example I prefere to stand back away from the crowd line where you have a bit more space. This then can give you a better angle too.

It is this stopping and thinking about what you are going to do first that makes the difference between so so and great pictures. Good quality lenses, not necessarliy L models, and not always Canon either help. For indoor shooting for example good light is important. If you are doing lots of studio type work then investing in some lights will probably make more difference to your work than any other items you could spend your money on. Most of the products I have had to photograph are a bit bigger than a simple plate of food. For items around the size of a table setting up to full length people size then either one of the sets of studio monoblock lighting sets from ebay or using Yonguo type flashguns on stands will be money well spent. If you are only going to be photographing smaller items then the Younguo type flashes or continuos lighting will be the better choice.

Alan

Hi Alan,
Ok - I just read a bit more about panning in Bryan Peterson's Understanding Exposure. I'm not sure why I assuming that when you moved the camera you moved with it. I think I understand more about it. He shows a gorgeous pix on a car traveling in a field of blurred yellow flowers.

With regard to the speedlight, would the Yonguo be better than say a comparable one from Canon, price-wise? Is this just as good as shooting in early morning natural light?

Marie


Marie
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eiram21
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Nov 30, 2012 08:18 |  #32

BigAl007 wrote in post #15305270 (external link)
Yes it is a panning shot. It also helped that I was positioned at the right place to catch them as they were lifting off and retacting the undercart. That comes with experiance, but I have been shooting airshows since about the age of ten, so nearly 40 years now. Also Duxford which was one of the fighter stations used in during the Battle of Britian in 1940 is now a major museum and has always been within a couple of hours drive of home for me.

This was the next shot in the burst.

Alan

Interesting Alan - is his book, Bryan Peterson notes that he "cannot overstate the importance of background when panning". Your examples definitely support this as the background in the first panning shot is more complex and yields more interesting results. Both are lovely though and I'd love to be able to take such great shots!


Marie
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BigAl007
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Nov 30, 2012 08:51 |  #33

Apart from air to air stuff, and aircraft comming stright towards you, pretty much all pictures of aircraft in flight will have some sort of panning technique used. This actually really applies to photographing any moving object. In my two examples the first shot has caught the plane while it is almost exactly level. At this point you have the maximum speed of movement. At Duxford the the crowd stands to the north of the runway, there is a hill to the south that allows a nice background as the aircraft take off. The fact that you can swing up to 180 degrees following the "target" can give you a range of different backgrounds.

As far as the flashguns go, I suggested the Younguo units as they are cheap. It is not a brand I am familliar with personally, as they are not promoted in the UK. They seem to have a good reputation as low cost off camera flash. Being able to control the lighting gives you many more options than just using natural light. For that sort of photography learning to work with your own light is well worth while. And of course you don't have to wait till the natural light is how you need it. Also with flash you can ensure that you have plenty of it, which is one of the ways you can maximise image quality especially with older sensors. I now always use ETTR techniques along with shooting RAW.

Alan


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1ds4Me
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Nov 30, 2012 10:28 |  #34

eiram21 wrote in post #15306094 (external link)
Thanks so much for that comprehensive comparison. I saw the 7D and it looks like an awesome camera. I must admit, I spilled chocolate milk on the 300D years ago, and I'm not sure what effects that caused. I looked into having the camera cleaned but I think the cleaning costs more than the camera is worth at this stage!

Well at least your images must be coming out smelling like chocolates. :)




  
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eiram21
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Nov 30, 2012 14:56 |  #35

BigAl007 wrote in post #15307950 (external link)
Apart from air to air stuff, and aircraft comming stright towards you, pretty much all pictures of aircraft in flight will have some sort of panning technique used. This actually really applies to photographing any moving object. In my two examples the first shot has caught the plane while it is almost exactly level. At this point you have the maximum speed of movement. At Duxford the the crowd stands to the north of the runway, there is a hill to the south that allows a nice background as the aircraft take off. The fact that you can swing up to 180 degrees following the "target" can give you a range of different backgrounds.

As far as the flashguns go, I suggested the Younguo units as they are cheap. It is not a brand I am familliar with personally, as they are not promoted in the UK. They seem to have a good reputation as low cost off camera flash. Being able to control the lighting gives you many more options than just using natural light. For that sort of photography learning to work with your own light is well worth while. And of course you don't have to wait till the natural light is how you need it. Also with flash you can ensure that you have plenty of it, which is one of the ways you can maximise image quality especially with older sensors. I now always use ETTR techniques along with shooting RAW.

Alan

thanks, Alan.


Marie
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SkipD
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Nov 30, 2012 15:30 |  #36

eiram21 wrote in post #15300537 (external link)
Just finished shooting some soup photos and was so excited to view them. Then I realized the camera card wasn't in the camera!! This has happened so many times. Another reason I want a new camera. Don't the newer ones record right to the camera?

None of Canon's DSLRs have internal memory for image storage.

You can probably change a setting even in your 300D that will disable the shutter release if the memory card is not installed. My 20D - one of the next cameras produced after the 300D - has that feature.


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eiram21
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Nov 30, 2012 15:48 |  #37

SkipD wrote in post #15309457 (external link)
None of Canon's DSLRs have internal memory for image storage.

You can probably change a setting even in your 300D that will disable the shutter release if the memory card is not installed. My 20D - one of the next cameras produced after the 300D - has that feature.

Oh, that would be GREAT!! I've gotta see if the 300D has that


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Davinor
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Nov 30, 2012 17:12 |  #38

install the undutchables hack. its custom function2


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eiram21
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Nov 30, 2012 20:08 |  #39

Davinor wrote in post #15309864 (external link)
install the undutchables hack. its custom function2

Woo hoo! I was hoping the hack would have that included. Thanks so much!


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Yogi ­ Bear
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Dec 01, 2012 17:43 |  #40

eiram21 wrote in post #15307839 (external link)
With regard to the speedlight, would the Yonguo be better than say a comparable one from Canon, price-wise? Is this just as good as shooting in early morning natural light?

Marie

When it comes to automatic capable flashes, The Yongnuos are hard to beat for price. Definitely cheaper than Canon. Of course, with the low price comes cheaper, less durable build quality and, probably, lower reliability. It is hard to beat the Canon flashes for reliability, but you pay extra for that reliability.

For starting out on a budget, I would recommend a flash comparable to Canon's 430 EX or 430 EX II. Speedlights.net is a great site for learning more about specific flashes. It looks like the Yongnuo YN 465 would be a fair comparison, in most respects, but not all: http://speedlights.net …del=YN465&model​2=430EX+II (external link)
If you can find a used 430 EX or 430 EX II that would be better, in my opinion. With rare exceptions, flashes just don't seem to 'wear out' and buying used is generally a safe bet.

The "Morning Light" is tough to reproduce, so I wouldn't expect too much there, especially from a cheap flash. This is a case where 'the real thing' is going to be hard to beat!

Yogi


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eiram21
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Dec 01, 2012 19:05 |  #41

Yogi Bear wrote in post #15313560 (external link)
When it comes to automatic capable flashes, The Yongnuos are hard to beat for price. Definitely cheaper than Canon. Of course, with the low price comes cheaper, less durable build quality and, probably, lower reliability. It is hard to beat the Canon flashes for reliability, but you pay extra for that reliability.

For starting out on a budget, I would recommend a flash comparable to Canon's 430 EX or 430 EX II. Speedlights.net is a great site for learning more about specific flashes. It looks like the Yongnuo YN 465 would be a fair comparison, in most respects, but not all: http://speedlights.net …del=YN465&model​2=430EX+II (external link)
If you can find a used 430 EX or 430 EX II that would be better, in my opinion. With rare exceptions, flashes just don't seem to 'wear out' and buying used is generally a safe bet.

The "Morning Light" is tough to reproduce, so I wouldn't expect too much there, especially from a cheap flash. This is a case where 'the real thing' is going to be hard to beat!

Yogi

This is why I aim to shoot in natural light - so much easier and beautiful too. BUT, part of the reason for blogging was to force myself to learn more about photography and so I think learning more about flash is in order.

Many thanks for your recommendations.


Marie
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BigAl007
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Dec 02, 2012 07:10 |  #42

Although Yongous make ETTL compatible flash guns, I was really thinking using two or three of the simple flashguns that they make along with some modifiers like softboxes and brollies. This is probably the cheapest route, and if you are not having to light really large objects should give you some really good results. The advantage you have with photographing still life type subjects is that they stay still while you play with the lights. Not having to spend money on film makes this really easy.Just shoot it again if you are not happy with the first attempt.

Alan


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Old Digital Rebel 300D
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