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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Astronomy & Celestial Talk 
Thread started 22 Jan 2013 (Tuesday) 09:56
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how can i find the stars rotation?

 
Romax12
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Jan 22, 2013 09:56 |  #1

hello everyone.
i've tried to do a little star trails photography and this was the result:


IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8045/8381807986_e532a1056b_b.jpg
[/URL]


so, as you can see, i didn't capture the spinning that i wish to photograph. you know, when there's one star in the middle which isn't moving and all of the other stars make a circle around him?
i think i heard somewhere that the star im looking for is called "polar" or something.. is that right?
and how can i find this star?
i live in israel if that matters.
thanks for helping

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AmitShinde0511
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Jan 22, 2013 11:00 |  #2

Where was your camera facing? Your camera position should be facing North East sky to get star trails in circles.


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Romax12
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Jan 22, 2013 11:09 |  #3

i was facing east.
you sure i should point my camera to north-east regardless of my country?


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gjl711
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Jan 22, 2013 11:17 |  #4

Romax12 wrote in post #15519974 (external link)
i was facing east.
you sure i should point my camera to north-east regardless of my country?

Point north in the northern hemisphere and south in the southern hemisphere. The farther from the poles you are, the more difficult it will be to get the circles you are looking for. Stars do rotate around each other but to capture that rotation you will need a shutter speed in the order of several million years or more.

The circular pattern you see is the earth rotating. In the northern hemisphere Polaris is very close to the point of rotation so it looks as if all the others stars are rotating around it. From Israel I'm thinking that Polaris is very low on the horizon and you will not be able to get very much rotation around it, but that's the star you're looking for.


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va_rider
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Jan 22, 2013 11:20 |  #5

northern hemisphere photogs point to Polaris. Southern Hemisphere folks point towards Sigma Octantis.


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Jan 22, 2013 12:21 |  #6

I talked to a buddy who's an astro-physicist... he confirms that you should be pointing towards Polaris... but.. I'm wondering if Polaris is below the horizon for you.

I did a quick Google search for Star Trails over Israel, and everything I managed to find looked like yours. I couldn't find anything with the tighter circles that you'd be able to get when pointed to Polaris.


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gjl711
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Jan 22, 2013 12:24 |  #7

va_rider wrote in post #15520286 (external link)
I talked to a buddy who's an astro-physicist... he confirms that you should be pointing towards Polaris... but.. I'm wondering if Polaris is below the horizon for you..

Shouldn't be below the horizon but it's going to be so low that it will be hard to find.


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Jan 22, 2013 12:33 |  #8

I've got an app (SkySafari for the iphone) that identifies where all the stars are in the sky based on where I point the phone. It is a helpful tool to get that "spinning" effect.

North

IMAGE: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6202/6079734626_9f376f2277_n.jpg
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compared to same spot looking SouthEast
IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8073/8290334351_c8bb778cca_n.jpg
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RAWuser
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Jan 22, 2013 13:18 |  #9

Romax12 wrote in post #15519693 (external link)
hello everyone.
i've tried to do a little star trails photography and this was the result:


QUOTED IMAGE


Lovely image and color! I think your camera was pointing to the South-east in this image as that constellation in the center look like Canis Major to me. If so, you've bagged the brightest star, Sirius, in the night sky in this image. It's that bright streak in the center.

=]

so, as you can see, i didn't capture the spinning that i wish to photograph. you know, when there's one star in the middle which isn't moving and all of the other stars make a circle around him?
i think i heard somewhere that the star im looking for is called "polar" or something.. is that right?
and how can i find this star?
i live in israel if that matters.
thanks for helping

Get a magnetic compass, a GPS unit, or a map of your area. Find your North and point your camera that way. :-)

P.S. You are on a higher latitude than where I am and as long as there are no obstructions (trees, buildings, etc) in my view, I can see Polaris just fine. Which means Polaris is in view for you, too.




  
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Romax12
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Jan 22, 2013 13:46 |  #10

ok. thanx for all the comments. will try that in the upcoming days. and again thanx!


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doug ­ waters
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Jan 23, 2013 17:06 as a reply to  @ Romax12's post |  #11

nice shot!

get stellatium (external link) it's free!

according to stellarium you are near 32° N latitude, i'm near 36° N latitude, so you are a little further south. here is a pic i shot earlier this month.

good luck!


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Jan 23, 2013 17:16 |  #12

JasonMK wrote in post #15520348 (external link)
I've got an app (SkySafari for the iphone) that identifies where all the stars are in the sky based on where I point the phone. It is a helpful tool to get that "spinning" effect.

Yep, and if you've got an Android phone Google Sky Map works the same way, and it's free.


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zerovision
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Jan 23, 2013 17:23 |  #13

One of the best ways to find polaris is to find the big dipper, draw a line from the star the is located at the outer bottom corner of the pot to the star that is located at the outer upper corner of the pot and continue to the brightest star you see. Depending on time of year, the big dipper may be upside down, right side up or tipping as if to be pouring something out. If you fix the center of your lens on that star you should get circles around that point.


  
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Jan 24, 2013 03:59 |  #14

zerovision wrote in post #15525713 (external link)
Depending on time of year, the big dipper may be upside down, right side up or tipping as if to be pouring something out.

Depending on your location on the planet (and time of year) the Big Dipper may be visible all night, visible part of the night or not visible at all. During the summer months people at the OP's latitude will have the Big Dipper below the horizon for most of the night.


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Jan 24, 2013 17:23 |  #15

Just take a compass with your and point your camera Exactly north right down the line. You may not be able to see polaris but it doesn't matter because what ever you frame as your subject matter will get field rotation around it as long as you are pointing North. Also if you have a panhead, angle finder, or iphone/android with angle finder app set your camera mount's angle to the correct latitude of your location and aim north and you will have the stars rotate around the center of your image.


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how can i find the stars rotation?
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