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Thread started 22 Jan 2013 (Tuesday) 12:27
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How do you store your Media?

 
pdrober2
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Jan 22, 2013 21:45 |  #16

CxThree wrote in post #15522473 (external link)
I put them all on my local Hard drive via lightroom import. I then run a utility called SyncToy that copies them to my Windows Home Server Photos share in a closet in my home. Each night, a separate image backup of all my home computers is done by WIndows Home Server. All data on the home server is stored on a redundant drive array. As a separate precaution, I manually backup my images to an external USB drive on a regular basis and store that in a fireproof safe (large 800lb) in my home. I have a 2nd copy of this at my office.

Nicely done sir!


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Rai33
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Jan 23, 2013 04:01 |  #17

Apologies if this is stating the obvious.

For all those that mention keeping a disk offsite that is physically moved between the production and offsite locations - you need three copies of your data on separate media to do this this properly which ensures you never have all your data copies in the same place at any one time. As an example, to do this you'd need as follows:

1. Production Disk
2. Offsite 1 Backup Disk
3. Offsite 2 Backup DIsk
...backup to "offsite disk 1" and bring to offsite location and swap with "offsite disk 2"


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CxThree
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Jan 23, 2013 10:07 |  #18

For me, yes. I use a couple of 3TB external USB devices right now. When I do a manual backup, those each get a copy of the data. One goes in my safe at home and the other goes in my filing cabinet in my locked office in corporate America. :) My normal backups are all done by Windows home server. The advantage to that piece is in the event of a loss of a HD in my main pc, I pop a new one in, connect to the home server , and it brings back last night's complete image with all my stuff restored.


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phoomanchew
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Jan 23, 2013 11:47 |  #19

Rai33 wrote in post #15523288 (external link)
Apologies if this is stating the obvious.

For all those that mention keeping a disk offsite that is physically moved between the production and offsite locations - you need three copies of your data on separate media to do this this properly which ensures you never have all your data copies in the same place at any one time. As an example, to do this you'd need as follows:

1. Production Disk
2. Offsite 1 Backup Disk
3. Offsite 2 Backup DIsk
...backup to "offsite disk 1" and bring to offsite location and swap with "offsite disk 2"

I have to agree. I have all my media on a ReadyNAS Ultra 4 and back it up using The 3-2-1 Rule (external link) which is very similar to what Rai33 mentioned.


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Simon_Gardner
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Jan 23, 2013 14:31 |  #20

I'll just toss in my reminder that I lost two 4Tb drives within a week of each other last year. Both were under a year old.


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bfahrer
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Jan 23, 2013 15:48 |  #21

Just an FYI for a cheaper solution you can always use an older PC that you have laying around and put FreeNAS on it. It will run on an old 486, and be solid as a rock.

Personally I almost do exactly what CxThree posted except I have syncToy sync my data between all 5 machines in the house once a night.

I'm not a big fan of portable drives, even though I do use them as a back up and transportation, I dont find them to be reliable since they get moved around. I've had 3 of them fail. I have yet to try using a larger SSD as external drive though


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samsen
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Jan 23, 2013 17:00 |  #22

bfahrer wrote in post #15525319 (external link)
Just an FYI for a cheaper solution you can always use an older PC that you have laying around and put FreeNAS on it. It will run on an old 486, and be solid as a rock.

But will a 486 set up even recognize terabyte hard drive to write on?


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bfahrer
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Jan 24, 2013 06:54 |  #23

good question, I doubt the bios would support that. I've only read stories on the FreeNas forums of people doing this, not sure how much storage they had. I had a Pentium 2 with 500 gig of storage in it 3 yrs ago and it ran like a champ, the xfer speeds werent terribly impressive but none the less it never once shut off or failed. I ran it for almost a year straight, then I decided to update the freenas OS.


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oONIo
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Jan 25, 2013 02:15 |  #24

I have a NAS with 4 hard drive slots. RAID 5 was configured for preventing data loss.




  
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Rai33
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Jan 25, 2013 03:17 |  #25

oONIo wrote in post #15531248 (external link)
I have a NAS with 4 hard drive slots. RAID 5 was configured for preventing data loss.

So you can sustain a disk failure but if that's all you have you're still prone to data loss e.g. if your system is stolen, data corrupted etc.


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bratkinson
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Jan 25, 2013 06:51 |  #26

RAID for storage? Unless one really understands RAID and what it takes to replace/rebuild a failed drive, it seems to me to be doing it the hard way.

I use a 128gb SSD for my operating system, documents, and all 'in process' photo shoots. Everything else is on a 1tb hard drive. When a shoot is done, it goes to the hard drive and removed from the SSD. I have twins of each that I clone to about 1/week for the SSD and 1/month for the hard drive. I then use the clones and remove the 'originals'. All are in slide-in-out drawers that make swapping very quick and easy. For offsite storage, I copy it all to a USB 3 1TB external drive after finishing each shoot.

Now before someone yells 'RAID is so much easier'...Perhaps it is. Until you download some software that was supposed to 'clean up' your computer and instead makes it unbootable, and removes 1/2 the installed software to boot! It happened to me 2 months ago! After repeated efforts at restoring the registry, 'rolling back' changes, etc, I gave up and simply put the other SSD in its place. I then copied the email from the 'trashed' SSD to the 'good' SSD. Had I been using RAID for my operating system, all would have been lost, as it would have been necessary to restore Windows and start over.


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Yavomo
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Jan 26, 2013 04:56 |  #27

Here are the process I follow:

1. Dump to my notebook SSD (256GB) in series of folders based on events/context
2. Keyword/Tag photos while importing to Adobe LR
3. Post-Process workflows in LR/PS
4. Publish selected photos as JPEG to Flickr
5. Publish selected photos as 8-bit uncompressed TIFF to Zenfolio
6. Copy folder to External HDD as emergency backup
6. Move Folder to my NAS (Synology DS412+). Transfer rate is 107MB/s.
7. Sync it back to LR.

My NAS Synology is Hybrid RAID using 2x 2TB storage. When it's filled (in a few months), I'll add 2x 4TB to the remaining HDD bay.

I just recently upgraded from QNAP TS-410. It was the biggest piece of crap ever with upload transfer speed of 17MB/s which takes ages when dumping photoshoot up to 130GB on a day. I sent more time transferring than processing photos!


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P51Mstg
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Jan 26, 2013 07:44 as a reply to  @ post 15522473 |  #28

For Mike_D, the feature where you can hook up additional units, really isn't as important in "home" use vs a business. When you consider how long it will take you to fill the unit up, by the time comes to get an expansion unit, there will be a replacement.

The replacement will be either a newer faster higher capacity "base" unit or the expansion unit may not be in production anymore and the replacement may not be compatible.

HOWEVER, that means you can buy the expansion unit on Ebay for a fraction of its initial value.

What I do is as I need more space, I buy a newer faster bigger NAS and rotate the old NAS into a backup for it. The oldest smallest backups eventually get sold.

Having a smaller slower (or for that matter say 2 units) for backup doesn't really matter since generally you only add some data onto the backup and it would be rare that you need to restore an entire NAS.

The one thing I've learned about them (I use Thecus since that is what I happened to buy when I got to serious units), is that the more you spend, the faster they get. When I started with WD Sharespace cubes of 4TB, they were maybe 20MB/sec transfer at best. So try and load Digital Photo Professional with 1000 RAW images. It takes literally all day. The Thecus 8900 I'm running now moves data at about 120MB/sec and its darn fast. At the time I bought them the WD was about $700 a few years back. The Thecus is about $2500 plus the cost of 8 drives (say $4000 total). But if you really want to work with it, you need to pay to play.

Buy the unit with the fastest processor you can. Processor power is more important than the amount of memory in the unit. Plus check out speed tests on the web comparing units.

Hard drive speed makes a real difference too. You need to look at recommended hard drives too. NOT ALL VERSIONS of drives work the same way. There are ones that work with RAIDS and some that don't. So a WD20EADS drive may not work while a WD20EARS drive does (interestingly WD recently recommended that ALL their GREEN drives not be used in RAIDS since they may not hold up under the duty cycle) I disagree with the WD recomendation since Thecus tested the drives to see which one WORKS in a raid. As far as duty cycle is concerned, with 1Million hours MTBF, hard to see the drives failing under "home" use (results may be different in a business where the drives are running and accessing data constantly)...

A work around for the speed is to copy the files you are working with to your computer and keep a "backup" on the NAS. You get the speed and as you copy the files over, you can take a small break and get some coffee (or other beverage).....

Last, I use ALLWAYS SYNC to synch the NAS and the backups. Work great and the basic version is free (of course if you use it a lot, the software suggests you buy the PRO version, which is well worth it).

Mark H


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mike_d
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Jan 26, 2013 11:13 |  #29

I didn't get the NAS I got primarily for the expansion units but I like having the option. One big reason for the NAS in the first place was so that I wouldn't have to constantly migrate data to some other solution. My NAS is already bumping up against the limits of GigaBit Ethernet.

Regarding WD Green drives, the issue is with the idle timer. It parks the heads and spins down after 8 seconds of inactivity. This can cause big problems in RAID arrays. I used the wdidle3 utility to disable the idle timer on all of my green drives before installing them in the NAS. I'm currently in the process of replacing all of my drives with WD Reds though since they have other features that make them more appropriate for NASs.




  
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breney
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Jan 26, 2013 11:17 |  #30

What is your opinions on the use of a mac pro as a NAS? as opposed to a dedicated nas like a synology?


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How do you store your Media?
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