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FORUMS General Gear Talk Computers 
Thread started 13 Feb 2013 (Wednesday) 22:53
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Adding a designated scratch disk

 
Simpleboy
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Feb 13, 2013 22:53 |  #1

Howdy all,

So I've built myself a computer, i5, lots of ram, 240GB SSD and an external 3TB USB3 hard drive (second one coming next payday) to replace my two 1 TB drives.

At the moment, when I get back from a shoot, I first put my photos onto the SSD, do my editing, then a couple weeks later transfer them to my externals.

Im still happy to tinker with the setup, so I was wondering what benefits I'd get by adding in a small SSD (or HDD) as a designated scratch disk?

Thanks in advance.




  
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tickerguy
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Feb 14, 2013 06:45 |  #2

If you have enough room on the SSD for scratch (cache, etc) there's no point. Unlike a rotating disk SSD has no latency contribution from moving head sliders and none of the current SSDs hit SATA channel speeds.

Note that many SSDs do get slower as they get closer to full due to controller overhead when writing, so if you're running more than ~80% of capacity on the SSD you may get benefit from it.


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ShotByTom
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Feb 14, 2013 19:22 |  #3

I asked a similar question here and found that having a designated scratch/cache drive with an SSD main drive doesn't really give you any added benefit.


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tim
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Feb 16, 2013 05:42 |  #4

Modern SSDs have enough bandwidth to be both image storage and caches, but the more chips you spread your data storage across the faster things are, at least in theory. Not sure USB3 is ideal, SATA is still faster and lower latency.


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Adding a designated scratch disk
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