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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 03 Apr 2013 (Wednesday) 16:42
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new studio photographer questions!

 
lisaannephotography
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Apr 03, 2013 16:42 |  #1

I just started the journey to become a baby portrait photographer. I have an alienbee b800 light with a large octabox and that's it for lighting. (A little ambient light from windows in my home.) I keep getting shadows on subject's face when the light is a few feet away & a bit to the right. Is this the proper set up? SHould I have the light in front of the subject instead of the side? I don't have any other lighting/reflectors. Is there any way to fix the shadowing problem without getting any other equipment? Thanks so much!




  
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BrickR
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Apr 03, 2013 16:57 |  #2

You could use a reflector to bounce light back onto the babies' face, but after shooting an infant and a toddler, I personally prefer constant light for them. I don't have to adjust light power, they can move around pretty freely, I don't have to wait for recycle if needed, and what you see is what you get.
Plus one infant started to break out from stress with the speedlight going off constantly which made more work in post and harder on the poor little girl :(

Although a reflector or white board is pretty inexpensive, if you don't want to get any more equipment, you can move closer to the window and balance the flash with the ambient, or boom in front and above; if your floor is white it will bounce the light up to fill in the shadows or you can use a longer lens so that the boomed light can be closer to be softer but you will have image compression so it won't be seen or what little is can be cloned out.

Constant light makes it much easier for me though, just my .02 :)


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drvnbysound
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Apr 03, 2013 18:11 |  #3

Could you post an example? I'm interested to see the 'shadowing problem' when you are using a large octabox a few feet away from a baby (i.e. small subject).

There are plenty of portraits here that were shot with a single strobe:
https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=969584


I use manual exposure settings on the copy machine
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PacAce
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Apr 04, 2013 07:20 |  #4

lisaannephotography wrote in post #15787837 (external link)
I just started the journey to become a baby portrait photographer. I have an alienbee b800 light with a large octabox and that's it for lighting. (A little ambient light from windows in my home.) I keep getting shadows on subject's face when the light is a few feet away & a bit to the right. Is this the proper set up? SHould I have the light in front of the subject instead of the side? I don't have any other lighting/reflectors. Is there any way to fix the shadowing problem without getting any other equipment? Thanks so much!

You do NOT want to eliminate shadows. (Shadows is what gives a 2D image a 3D look.) What you want to do is to control the light so that the shadows are not harsh unless that's what's needed. The light source should be placed so that the shadows fall naturally. For example, placing the light below will cast upward shadows which is not really good for portraits unless you're going for the horror or scary look. LOL ;)

The closer you place the light to the subject, the softer and hence, generally more pleasing, the shadows will be.


...Leo

  
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drvnbysound
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Apr 04, 2013 07:56 |  #5

Well, unless you just want flat lighting...


I use manual exposure settings on the copy machine
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...A few umbrella brackets I own...

  
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ksbal
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Apr 04, 2013 08:34 |  #6

Shutter speed controls the ambient light. Aperture controls the exposure from the Alien B.

Go to P mode, take a picture.. then go to manual, start at those settings, and play with only the shutter speed. The faster the shutter speed, the less ambient light and the more contrast/shadows will stand out. The slower the shutter speed, the more ambient, and the 'flatter' the light will probably be. And somewhere there is a mix that is pleasing to you.

Posting a picture with the camera settings would get the best input from us.


Godox/Flashpoint r2 system, plus some canon stuff.

  
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PacAce
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Apr 04, 2013 08:50 |  #7

drvnbysound wrote in post #15789584 (external link)
Well, unless you just want flat lighting...

Yes, of course...unless you really want flat lighting for baby pictures. :)


...Leo

  
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Curtis ­ N
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Apr 04, 2013 08:55 |  #8

Lisa Anne,
Post a few samples of what you have done. You'll get more effective guidance that way.


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Sleepynupe
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Apr 04, 2013 20:16 |  #9

Second light source in addition to your flash is the answer. 2 softboxes and you are set. You might consider a backdrop also



'Get close to your subjects"
Canon 6D|T3i

  
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medicdude
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Apr 05, 2013 22:45 |  #10

Check out zack arias one light DVD. Very informative.


Dustin
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drvnbysound
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Apr 06, 2013 01:31 |  #11

medicdude wrote in post #15795986 (external link)
Check out zack arias one light DVD. Very informative.

This!


I use manual exposure settings on the copy machine
..::Gear Listing::.. --==Feedback==--
...A few umbrella brackets I own...

  
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