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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 11 Apr 2013 (Thursday) 20:52
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Photos keep getting blown out! Help!

 
lisaannephotography
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Apr 11, 2013 20:52 |  #1

So I'm new at studio photography, I have a b800 with a large octabox, and I usually have it at half power, about 4 feet away & up above the subject. My settings on the camera are usually: ISO 100, SS 160, & F stop between 8-10. I've played around with the settings & where the light is positioned quite a bit, and the photos keep ending up a little washed out. What is the best way to fix this? Also, what is "hot lighting" ? On the critique forums I keep getting told my lighting is a bit hot but not sure what that means. :oops:

Thanks so much!!

(I'll attach an example)


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sapearl
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Apr 11, 2013 20:57 |  #2

Lisa, how are you measuring exposure? Are you using a flash meter?


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lisaannephotography
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Apr 11, 2013 21:23 as a reply to  @ sapearl's post |  #3

sapearl, I tried using a flash meter (cheap one from amazon) & it kept saying to use F stop 12+, which made the photos too dark. So I've just been using "trial & error" really.




  
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sapearl
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Apr 11, 2013 21:31 |  #4

Well, hot lighting can mean two things depending upon context. Originally they were continuous incandescent lights (not like our strobes today). Or if thing are overly exposed, people sometimes say the subject is a bit "hot."

Judging by the sample you have I don't believe you are too far off in your trial and error. You are maybe only 1-2 stops overexposed. Try using f/11 or f/16 which will give you a deep depth of field which you may not want, or simply move the light from 4' out to 8' which will cut the intensity by about a stop if I did my math correctly. You are getting close, so try things in small, 1-stop increments. Good luck!;) Btw - I forgot my manners....welcome to POTN.


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drvnbysound
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Apr 11, 2013 21:32 |  #5

The term 'hot' is referring to there being too much light... However, the term 'cold' doesn't mean that it's dark ;-)a

If you aren't using a flash meter, use the histogram on the back of your camera. When you see that there are large amounts (and specifically peaks) on the right side of the histogram, it's usually overexposed. Also, turn on the 'blinkies' so that it shows you what parts of the image are overexposed.

When you used the flash meter, did you also match the ISO setting on the meter to your camera setting?


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Apr 11, 2013 21:36 |  #6

Are you shooting in Manual mode (M)?


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Apr 11, 2013 22:17 |  #7

feather the light.


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Apr 12, 2013 01:44 |  #8

Up your F stop to around 11-16.




  
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drvnbysound
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Apr 12, 2013 02:48 |  #9

kouasupra wrote in post #15818635 (external link)
Up your F stop to around 11-16.

For the picture above, this would have worked...

Hopefully, the OP understands that this isn't necessary for all future shoots though.


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Submariner
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Apr 12, 2013 04:34 |  #10

Interesting OP says uses F8-10. This gives overblown images. So lets assume she was using F10.
(Sorry can't see exif data on an ipad4.)

And the cheapo lightnmeter says F12. Not that far off - looks like F11 to F12 might be perfect.
Or set for F12 and compensate on camera with -1/2 F stop. On the exposure overide.
On my camera the 7D being a little hot say 1/3 hot and binging it back in post is alledgedly better i.e. less noise!


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Apr 12, 2013 05:48 |  #11

Call me crazy, but I'd reduce the flash power. 1/4 of a B800 is quite a bit of power, even through a soft box.

Here's a quick test for you: explain in 10 words or less the relationship between shutter speed, aperture, and iso. 10 words is more than a professional needs, but is far less than an amateur needs.


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Apr 12, 2013 10:03 |  #12

If you don't trust the light meter then maybe try this. Scroll down to the gent holding the towel.

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Apr 12, 2013 10:11 |  #13

howesit wrote in post #15819644 (external link)
another option is to bump the shutter speed up a little, but you probably can't bump it too much.

Sorry, that's bad advice. Changing the shutter speed will not change the flash exposure.


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Apr 12, 2013 10:28 |  #14

Yeah. Just pick 1/125 for a basic starting point as you are not interested in balancing ambient in the studio. Typical studio F stop for studio is about F8 and ISO at 100 as those strobes are powerful. Adjust flash power using the white towel method and see what you get.


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edge100
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Apr 12, 2013 10:44 |  #15

howesit wrote in post #15819644 (external link)
another option is to bump the shutter speed up a little, but you probably can't bump it too much.

HUH???

How does shutter speed affect flash exposure?

To the OP: lower flash power and/or stop down and/or move the softbox further away. ANY of those things will reduce flash exposure.


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Photos keep getting blown out! Help!
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