Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon Accessories 
Thread started 22 May 2013 (Wednesday) 16:23
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Any good reasons to use a ballhead on a monopod?

 
Trugga
Senior Member
Avatar
651 posts
Gallery: 41 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 337
Joined Jan 2011
Location: West Midands, UK
     
May 23, 2013 01:50 as a reply to  @ post 15958790 |  #16

I use a Manfrotto monopod and ball head - I like it.

PHOTOBUCKET EMBEDDING IS DISABLED BY THIS MEMBER.
Photobucket sends ads instead of embedding photos from their free galleries.
Click the link (if available) below to see the image in a gallery page.

http://i243.photobucke​t.com …gga_bucket/cano​n/mono.jpg (external link)


Used with a 7D & grip with the 100-400, with the ball head clamp loose but the friction wound up, I find it a useful tool.

Using the friction of the ball head allows me to easily and quickly recompose - mostly used for birding, once at an airshow and twice at a football game.

Mind you, I have no experience of other systems to compare it to.

Lawrence



  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
afoton
Senior Member
Avatar
348 posts
Joined Apr 2012
Location: Norway
     
May 23, 2013 02:11 |  #17

My monopod came with a Sirui L-10, so I have tried it. It does the job, but I don't like it.
I also had a ball head lying, that didn't work on a tripod (pano base that doesn't was smooth, and a not that good tension control). And that head worked so much better on the monopod, for me at least. But this is much about personal preferences and taste.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
hollis_f
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,649 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 85
Joined Jul 2007
Location: Sussex, UK
     
May 23, 2013 04:49 |  #18

I'd only recommend a ballhead be used with a monopod for somebody with three, or more, hands.


Frank Hollis - Retired mass spectroscopist
Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he'll complain about the withdrawal of his free fish entitlement.
Gear Website (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
afoton
Senior Member
Avatar
348 posts
Joined Apr 2012
Location: Norway
     
May 23, 2013 05:33 |  #19

Why?
I have allways one hand on the camera or the lens. One hand goes for locking/unlocking the ball head, a tilt head also need this hand. With the monopod on the ground, I easily move the camera until the upper end of the monopod is in the posisition I want, or I use the hand not on the camera, to put the monopod in the right position. Then locking the ball, or just let it be free (with some tension) and after that, both hands on the camera/lens. I have just two hands, and I am happy with that.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
hollis_f
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,649 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 85
Joined Jul 2007
Location: Sussex, UK
     
May 23, 2013 06:04 |  #20

afoton wrote in post #15959215 (external link)
I use the hand not on the camera, to put the monopod in the right position. Then locking the ball

With one hand holding the camera, one hand holding the monopod in position, you then lock the ball?


Frank Hollis - Retired mass spectroscopist
Give a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he'll complain about the withdrawal of his free fish entitlement.
Gear Website (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
afoton
Senior Member
Avatar
348 posts
Joined Apr 2012
Location: Norway
     
May 23, 2013 06:19 |  #21

With the monopod on the ground, and one hand on the camera, supporting the top of the monopod, I don't need a hand on the monopod. So the free hand is using for locking the ball, exactly the same way as I would do with a tilt head.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
digital ­ paradise
How do I change this?
Avatar
14,741 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 8045
Joined Oct 2009
     
May 23, 2013 08:25 |  #22

Exactly. Since the monopod/ball head/camera system are all one piece I just hold the lens while I loosen or tighten the ball head. I have never felt that I required a 3rd hand. Super easy. I just make sure the knob is in the right during the set up so it is easy to get at.


Image Editing OK

Website (external link) ~ Buy/Sell Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bratkinson
Senior Member
643 posts
Likes: 4
Joined Dec 2011
Location: Western MA
     
May 24, 2013 00:45 |  #23

When I decided to get a monopod, I looked at the options of either a single-plane rotating head or a ball head. Being a cheapskate, I opted for a cheap ballhead on the basis I don't want to be 'locked' into left-to-right swivel only. I may be leaning against a wall, seated somewhere other than in a chair on a level floor, etc. Hence, the ballhead.

The cheapo ballhead worked OK until I put something bigger/heavier than my 24-105L on my L bracketed, gripped 60D. So I moved up to a Kirk ballhead with quick release clamp. Love it! Smooth, easy to use, and is very comfortable and secure-feeling with my gripped 5D3 and 80-200 f2.8L mounted.


"Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity." General George S Patton, Jr 1885-1945

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
dasher108
Goldmember
Avatar
1,098 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 319
Joined Aug 2011
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
     
May 24, 2013 00:56 |  #24

I have a ballhead on my mono, I use it quite often with 400L and bigmos. I love it!


T3i |70D |70-200L| 400L | 100-400L | 24-105L | 50 1.8 | sig 10-20 | sig 150-500

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Phoenixkh
a mere speck
6,837 posts
Gallery: 67 photos
Likes: 1448
Joined May 2011
Location: Gainesville, Florida
     
May 24, 2013 05:29 |  #25

I've been researching monopod heads and both the Kirk and RRS designs do allow you to rotate the clamp 90 degrees for different applications. I believe the Kirk requires an allen wrench and you loosen the clamp and rotate it while the RRS has a knob that releases the clamp for rotation. This is from their respective websites. I could be mistaken and am open to correction. ;)


Kim (the male variety) Canon 1DX2 | 1D IV | 16-35 f/4 IS | 24-105 f/4 IS | 100L IS macro | 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II | 100-400Lii | 50 f/1.8 STM | Canon 1.4X III
RRS tripod and monopod | 580EXII | Cinch 1 & Loop 3 Special Edition | Editing Encouraged

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
M_Six
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
7,424 posts
Gallery: 40 photos
Likes: 1230
Joined Dec 2010
Location: East Central IL
     
May 24, 2013 09:21 |  #26

I use a ballhead on a monopod to mount my Wimberley Sidekick. But in that configuration the ballhead is always static except for the pan motion.


Mark J.
Gear

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
waterrockets
Goldmember
Avatar
3,930 posts
Gallery: 8 photos
Likes: 267
Joined Jun 2010
Location: Austin (near TX)
     
May 24, 2013 11:20 |  #27

I have no head on my monopod, and have no desire to add one. I was surprised to see everyone uses them. A head would fill a much needed void on my monopod...

Maybe it's just based on what I shoot with it? Field sports...


1D MkIV | 1D MkIII | 550D w/grip & ML| EF 70-200mm f2.8L| EF 24-105mm f4L IS | Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS | Samyang 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC | 430EXii | EF 50mm f1.8

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Orogeny
Senior Member
Avatar
987 posts
Gallery: 35 photos
Likes: 669
Joined Aug 2003
Location: Houston, Texas
     
May 24, 2013 11:25 as a reply to  @ M_Six's post |  #28

I use a ballhead on my monopod all the time, but I use it in a different way than most. I use it like a gimbal. Below are photos of my set up, except that it is mounted on my tripod (it is hard to get the danged monopod to stand up on its own while I take a photo!). I don't lock the ball which allows me to tilt the camera up and down freely while holding the monopod still. This works extremely well.

IMAGE: http://www.pbase.com/orogeny/image/142435791.jpg

Tim

There's someone in my head, but it's not me! - Roger Waters

https://www.flickr.com​/photos/orogeny/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
digital ­ paradise
How do I change this?
Avatar
14,741 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 8045
Joined Oct 2009
     
May 24, 2013 11:25 |  #29

I could see there being a need with field sports if you are standing. As I said when sitting in the bleachers or static birds in the trees it helps me.


Image Editing OK

Website (external link) ~ Buy/Sell Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
lilkngster
Senior Member
721 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 38
Joined Sep 2010
Location: NJ
     
May 24, 2013 11:52 |  #30

RPCrowe wrote in post #15958605 (external link)
Great reply Jake...

I also don't like a ball head on my monopod. Instead, I use a Kirk MPA-1 which is the Manfrotto Tilt Head with a Kirk Arca Compatible Clamp attached. As you mentioned, it is decently sturdy and since my maximum load is a 400mm f/5.6L or 300mm f/4L IS lens on a Canon 7D camera, this works quite well for me. If I were using a heavier camera/lens package, I would definitely look into the Kirk MPA-2 or the RRS Heavy Duty Swivel or I would just use my Manfrotto Gimbal Head which works great on a monopod...

Since I use RRS L-brackets on my cameras without tripod rings, I needed to switch the clamp of the MPA-1 90 degrees so that slot will accept the L-bracket and allow the tilt to be back and forth, rather than side to side. This was easy to do with the MPA-1...

I don't know if you can switch the positioning of the clamp on the RRS heavy duty bracket so that the slot is at right angles to the direction of the tilt. I have looked at the RRS tilt once and didn't think that I could change the direction of the clamp. However, I could very well be wrong. I didn't pay that much attention to it since I had the Kirk MPA-1 which suited me well...

If you notice the heavy duty Kirk MPA-2 clamp in the illustration above, you will see that the direction of the clamp is correct for mounting a L-bracket equipped camera. The clamp slot is orientated 90 degrees differently than on the RRS swivel...


RRS has two versions, I think the difference is how easy it is to switch orientation (allen wrench vs fingers). Sirui cannot be rotated. Like CDS, I have a Sirui and very happy with it. The orientation of the clamp works fine if you use the lens' foot plate but does not work with an L plate. For the "heavier" lenses, I find it much easier to use when mouting the foot plate since it is closer to the center of gravity of the camera/lens combo, instead of mouting from the camera with all the weight going forward.


6dII/80d/1dIII|8mm to 400mm|Pro-10/100

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

8,655 views & 0 likes for this thread
Any good reasons to use a ballhead on a monopod?
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon Accessories 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Birdie760
542 guests, 294 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.