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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 03 Jul 2013 (Wednesday) 13:53
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how bad is it to switch lenses while camera is on?

 
Romax12
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Jul 03, 2013 13:53 |  #1

Hey everyone

Just got my 70-200 f2.8 is and i love it! It's really heavy and sometimes when i want to switch lenses I forget to turn off the camera.
Ive heard people say that it is totaly ok and that it has no risk at all.
On the other hand, Ive seen comments from people saying that canon says that it is a big no-no.

What do you guys think?


Canon t3i
--- EF-S 18-135 f3.5-5.6 IS --- EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS usm ---
600ex-rt and yn-622c (2x)

  
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kenwood33
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Jul 03, 2013 13:55 |  #2

i never turn my camera off to switch card/lens/battery, have not had any issues yet on any of the 4-5 cameras i have owned


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NemethR
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Jul 03, 2013 13:55 |  #3

I never turned amy of my cameras off while switching lenses, altough I don't switch them too often.
I can't really imagine it has any effect, exept when shutter button is halfway pressed, but again, that is not probably the case, if you switch lenses.


Roland | Amateur Photographer
Nikon D850 | Nikon 70-200 f/2.8G ED VR II | Nikon 24-70 f/2.8G ED

  
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cor726
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Jul 03, 2013 13:57 |  #4

I don't think you have anything to worry about. I do it all the time and have never had an issues with it.


Canon 7D, 50D, 40D, 20D and T3, Σ EX 10-20 f/4-5.6, 17-40 F/4L, Σ EX 18-50 f/2.8, 18-55 IS, 70-200 F/4L, Σ EX 30 f/1.4, 40 f/2.8 STM, 60 2.8 Macro, 85 f/1.8, 1.4x II, 430EXII
And a Canon Rebel S II & 35-80 f/4-5.6 USM

  
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gjl711
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Jul 03, 2013 14:03 |  #5

The camera has been designed to allow hot swaps of lenses. There is no issue in doing so. Those commenting differently need to provide a link from Canon stating that hot swapping a lens is not recommended. It is not in their manual. (I just checked)


Not sure why, but call me JJ.
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Romax12
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Jul 03, 2013 14:10 |  #6

thanks alot guys!


Canon t3i
--- EF-S 18-135 f3.5-5.6 IS --- EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS usm ---
600ex-rt and yn-622c (2x)

  
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jimewall
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Jul 03, 2013 14:19 as a reply to  @ Romax12's post |  #7

I change lenses when I need to, whether the camera is on or off it makes no difference.


Thanks for Reading & Good Luck - Jim
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JackLiu
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Jul 03, 2013 14:19 |  #8

Great info. Sometimes I unintentional hot swap a lens and would feel bad about it because of potential damage to the electronics.


"Love life and life will love you back. Love people and they will love you back." Arthur Rubinstein.

  
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mandon
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Jul 03, 2013 14:19 |  #9

hmmnn...if i remember right, if you are using 100 mm macro f2.8 IS, the lens manual said to turn off the camera for 1 or 2 seconds(?) to avoid damaging the IS....


550d gripped, 7d gripped,24 70L f2.8 , 100 L f2.8 macro, 70-200L f2.8 II, 12 24 sigma ex hsm dg, nifty fifty, fecked kit lens (repaired by canon for free) canon TC 2X III ,cybertick flash, cheap chinese remote control, trig master flash trigger, cheap tripod, jusino tripod, nissin 566

  
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gjl711
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Jul 03, 2013 14:24 |  #10

mandon wrote in post #16088137 (external link)
hmmnn...if i remember right, if you are using 100 mm macro f2.8 IS, the lens manual said to turn off the camera for 1 or 2 seconds(?) to avoid damaging the IS....

That's true for all IS lenses. Do not remove a IS lens while the IS is engaged. (I believe this is in the lens manuals, I didn't check)

However, the camera does not need to be turned off. Just don't 1/2 press the shutter and remove the lens, or have it in rapid fire with IS engaged and remove the lens. It takes a second or two for the IS to disengage once your finger is off the shutter button.

In practical terms, once you take a picture, get the camera away from your face, put it into the lens changing position, press the release button and twist the lens, more likely than not enough time would have passed for the IS to turn off.

If you race through all the steps and try really hard to remove the lens in less than 2 seconds after taking a picture, it probably possible and if you do so, bad things can happen to the IS.


Not sure why, but call me JJ.
I used to hate math but then I realised decimals have a point.
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mike_311
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Jul 03, 2013 15:21 |  #11

a guy who runs a camera shop told me once to turn off my camera when switching lenses. he said the sensor can attract dust more easily when the camera is powered on and open...


Canon 5d mkii | Canon 17-40/4L | Tamron 24-70/2.8 | Canon 85/1.8 | Canon 135/2L
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gjl711
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Jul 03, 2013 16:25 |  #12

mike_311 wrote in post #16088332 (external link)
a guy who runs a camera shop told me once to turn off my camera when switching lenses. he said the sensor can attract dust more easily when the camera is powered on and open...

How is it going to do that? Suck the dust right through the shutter blades? Think about it. It makes no sense. When the lens is removed, the sensor is not visible. It is behind the shutter blades.


Not sure why, but call me JJ.
I used to hate math but then I realised decimals have a point.
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KhanhD
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Jul 03, 2013 16:33 |  #13

You should have no issues as long as the body is not accessing the storage media at the time. This also applies to battery and card changing.


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Luckless
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Jul 03, 2013 16:40 |  #14

Just pulled my camera out of my gear bag (where it has been off for a few days), took the lens off and set it on a table in a sun beam so I could watch the dust falling in front of the lens mount.

Camera, while off, demonstrated a minimal field effect on the dust. (Common household dust, charge unknown)

Upon powering on the camera it then demonstrated a slightly stronger field effect, enough to deflect multiple particles from their downward path such that they landed inside the mounting flange.

So, while the sensor may be covered at this point it has encouraged several more pieces of dust to enter the body. Given that they are no in the body they have the potential of migrating toward the sensor during its normal operation.

Also noted, the field effect has not quickly dissipated after powering the camera off, suggesting whatever charge is causing it will remain for some time after switching the camera to the off position.


However, it should be noted that the total effect of this is likely to be negated completely by simply moving the camera gear around during normal lens changing functions... While the statement may technically be true, in practice it is likely to have such a minimal effect as to be undetectable in real world practices.


Canon EOS 7D | EF 28 f/1.8 | EF 85 f/1.8 | EF 70-200 f/4L | EF-S 17-55 | Sigma 150-500
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dexy101
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Jul 03, 2013 16:40 |  #15

gjl711 wrote in post #16088503 (external link)
How is it going to do that? Suck the dust right through the shutter blades? Think about it. It makes no sense. When the lens is removed, the sensor is not visible. It is behind the shutter blades.

How else does dust get on the sensor but when the lens is off. Do you think dust cant make it through the shutter blades? You are sadly mistaken. Dust is also attracted to electrostatic charges.




  
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how bad is it to switch lenses while camera is on?
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