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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 03 Jul 2013 (Wednesday) 13:53
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how bad is it to switch lenses while camera is on?

 
msowsun
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Jul 03, 2013 17:14 |  #16

I never turn off my camera. That includes when changing lenses or memory cards. I even leave it on when I change the battery. :D

Also, if you take a voltmeter to the camera contacts, there is voltage present even with the camera turned off. Three of the eight contacts show about 4 1/2 volts all the time with the main switch on or off. When you take the main battery out, the same three contacts show about 1/2 a volt which I assume is from the 3 volt date/time battery.

Chuck Westfall says there is NEVER an electrostatic charge to the sensor. Not even when making an exposure!

http://digitaljournali​st.org/issue0704/tech-tips.html (external link)

I cannot speak for other manufacturers' products, but EOS Digital SLRs with Canon CMOS image sensors do not carry electrostatic charges at any time. Also, when DSLR image sensors are discussed, it's important to remember that the surface of the sensor itself is never exposed to dust. Instead, a low-pass filter is permanently mounted in front of the sensor at a distance of a millimeter or so. The gap between the low-pass filter and the image sensor is hermetically sealed during the manufacturing and assembly process. Once that happens, additional dust particles are prevented from reaching the surface of the sensor. Loose dust particles will eventually end up on the front surface of the low-pass filter during normal use of the camera, such as changing lenses. For this reason, the low-pass filters used in EOS DSLRs are treated with an anti-static coating during the manufacturing process. This coating passively repels dust particles, but at no time is the filter electrically charged in the camera.


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Kronie
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Jul 03, 2013 17:28 |  #17

gjl711 wrote in post #16088076 (external link)
The camera has been designed to allow hot swaps of lenses. There is no issue in doing so. Those commenting differently need to provide a link from Canon stating that hot swapping a lens is not recommended. It is not in their manual. (I just checked)

Did you find the sentence that says that its recommended to switch lenses with the camera on?

I have heard both sides and because I know that an electric charge attracts dust particles I try and turn the camera off. Does it help? Who the hell knows. Its probably a similar argument to filters....




  
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prrs4me
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Jul 03, 2013 18:03 |  #18

When i sent my camera in to Canon to have my sensor cleaned, the representative told me to always switch the camera off when changing lenses. I didn't do it before but I do now. It's a simple and quick enough thing to do. Whether it makes a difference or not I don't know.




  
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patrick023
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Jul 03, 2013 18:06 |  #19

dexy101 wrote in post #16088561 (external link)
How else does dust get on the sensor but when the lens is off. Do you think dust cant make it through the shutter blades? You are sadly mistaken. Dust is also attracted to electrostatic charges.

I read something about that, and I think it was from Canon, back when I had my 20D. When the camera is on, the sensor does have a charge going through it which could attract dust.




  
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gjl711
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Jul 03, 2013 18:20 |  #20

Kronie wrote in post #16088696 (external link)
Did you find the sentence that says that its recommended to switch lenses with the camera on?

I have heard both sides and because I know that an electric charge attracts dust particles I try and turn the camera off. Does it help? Who the hell knows. Its probably a similar argument to filters....

Page 31 of the 5D Mark 2 manual has step by step instructions. Powering down the camera is not mentioned.
Page 31 of the 7D manual has step by step instructions. Powering down the camera is not mentioned.
Page 25 of the 350D manual has step by step instructions. Powering down the camera is not mentioned.
Page 36 of the 600D manual has step by step instructions. Powering down the camera is not mentioned.
Page 52 of the AE-1 manual has step by step instructions. Powering down the camera is not mentioned. In fact, for some lenses need to be removed before advancing the film.

I'm sure every manual is the same. These are some of the ones that I have searchable.

And the post just before yours has the quote from Chuck Westfall, the Technical Advisor of the Professional Engineering & Solutions Division at Canon U.S.A where he states that the sensor never has a charge on it. Pretty clear I think.

The point is that there is no recommendation to do either. It doesn't say to turn it on, nor does it say to turn it off. This means that it just plain doesn't matter what you do. If it floats your boat to turn it off, that's just fine. Do so. If you don't want to turn it off, that's fine as well. Do that.

But when someone asks if it is ok to change the lens with the camera powered on, the answer should be yes, it is just fine, and not "I turn it off" or "I know a guy who knows a guy who said to turn it off". That info is just plain wrong. If you want to answer that it doesn't matter but I prefer to turn it off, that's fine, but don't perpetuate the web myth that the camera must be turned off to change the lens.


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patrick023
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Jul 03, 2013 19:26 |  #21

gjl711 wrote in post #16088076 (external link)
The camera has been designed to allow hot swaps of lenses. There is no issue in doing so. Those commenting differently need to provide a link from Canon stating that hot swapping a lens is not recommended. It is not in their manual. (I just checked)

http://cpn.canon-europe.com …_image/sensor_c​leaning.do (external link)

Just in case you don't wanna click on the link, here's what it says:

Prevention is better than cure
You cannot stop dust getting into your digital camera, but you can reduce the risk a little using one or more of these simple procedures.

Switch the camera off before changing the lens. This reduces the static charge on the sensor and stops it attracting dust.




  
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mak65
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Jul 03, 2013 20:49 |  #22

Do it all the time and don't even think twice about it.




  
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Mag-1981
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Jul 03, 2013 21:04 |  #23

I always switch the camera off when switching lenses. Not b/c I've read anywhere that this is how it should be done but I just intuitively feel it's better to treat all electronic involving equipment this way and especially that it really doesn't cost anything. I guess it's similar to disconnecting devices from your PC/laptop-it doesn't do any harm if you just pull USB cable out, but to prevent the harm it's recommended to follow the procedure.




  
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kin2son
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Jul 03, 2013 21:19 |  #24
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Mag-1981 wrote in post #16089187 (external link)
I always switch the camera off when switching lenses. Not b/c I've read anywhere that this is how it should be done but I just intuitively feel it's better to treat all electronic involving equipment this way and especially that it really doesn't cost anything. I guess it's similar to disconnecting devices from your PC/laptop-it doesn't do any harm if you just pull USB cable out, but to prevent the harm it's recommended to follow the procedure.

Yea I guess no one can really argue with that. It's always better to be safe than sorry.

Although I always forget to turn mine off before switching, especially when in the middle of the heat :o


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Naito
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Jul 03, 2013 22:04 |  #25

I figure so long as I'm not doing it while I'm in live view, it's perfectly fine


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msowsun
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Jul 03, 2013 23:16 |  #26

Naito wrote in post #16089309 (external link)
I figure so long as I'm not doing it while I'm in live view, it's perfectly fine

It doesn't matter if you change lenses in Liveview because as soon as you start to remove the lens Liveview automatically shuts off. Same for Video mode. I have done it by accident MANY times. :oops:


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mike_d
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Jul 03, 2013 23:21 |  #27

I don't power off to change lenses but I do for memory card swaps on the off chance that hot-swapping a card could corrupt it.




  
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xinvisionx
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Jul 04, 2013 00:02 |  #28

mike_311 wrote in post #16088332 (external link)
a guy who runs a camera shop told me once to turn off my camera when switching lenses. he said the sensor can attract dust more easily when the camera is powered on and open...

This is true. But dust will happen regardless. So it's a "meh" issue.


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highway0691
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Jul 04, 2013 01:04 |  #29

[QUOTE=Romax12;1608803​3]Ive seen comments from people saying that canon says that it is a big no-no.quote]

I would say that applied some time ago and the reason for this is illustrated in a mishap I once experienced.

About 8 years ago back in the Canon 300D days, a slow camera when writing to a card, esp with a slow card. I changed a lens whilst it was writing and it corrupted the card.

Nowadays the writing's done in a flash.


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jra
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Jul 04, 2013 01:28 |  #30

I've rarely ever turned a camera off when switching lenses over the years and I've never had an issue. I'm sure that Canon is aware that most photogs switch lenses on the go and it's really no big deal. Switch away :)




  
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how bad is it to switch lenses while camera is on?
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