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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 06 Jul 2013 (Saturday) 16:01
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shooting in the shade.. effects contrast?

 
Romax12
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Jul 06, 2013 16:01 |  #1

hey all.
Ive recently got my 70-200 2.8 is mark 1..
I noticed that for almost every picture I take with it I have to pop up the contrast by about 30 points (or whatever its called in LR) to get a picture that is not flat. Does lighting effect contrast? cause sometimes im happy with the results but when im shooting after 7 oclock images look like they came out of a point and shoot.
I was also trying to play with the picture style but for some reason it doesn't look like its changing something.,,


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--- EF-S 18-135 f3.5-5.6 IS --- EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS usm ---
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gonzogolf
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Jul 06, 2013 16:09 |  #2

The brighter the light, the more contrast between the areas in full light versus those in shadow so yes, as you shoot in shade or lower light there is the possibility that your overall contrast will be lower. Given that shooting in the sun often exceeds the dynamic range of the camera many photographers prefer to shoot in shade, or in the golden hour just before sunset as you can always add contrast, but its harder to soften it. I would suggest shooting raw so that you have more subtle tonal controls in your conversion and not have to rely on picture style settings.




  
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Romax12
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Jul 06, 2013 16:13 |  #3

thanks for the quick reply.
Im always shooting raw yet still I prefer getting the right image on campera and not have to go into a pp program and start to play with each picture...


Canon t3i
--- EF-S 18-135 f3.5-5.6 IS --- EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS usm ---
600ex-rt and yn-622c (2x)

  
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BigAl007
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Jul 07, 2013 01:53 |  #4

The only way that you will see a difference in your RAW files from changing the Picture Style in camera is ifyou use DPP to process the file. Canon's software knows how to interpret the Picture Style information in order to process the RAW data into an image identically to the cameras processing. All other RAW processors use either their own default settings, or some user saved default settings. The Adobe RAW processor in LR/ACR has a set of Camera Profiles that you can select, with similar names to Canons built in Picture Styles. These can be used to change the look of the default image, while leaving the positions sliders alone. If you wish to "see" a result on the cameras LCD screen that closley matches the default Adobe profile, and also shows the best representation of the RAW data captured by the sensor in the cameras histograms then you should use the following settings. Standard PS with both Contrast and Saturation set to minimum (-4 on the in camera controls).

In LR you might want to try changing the Camera Style to Camera Landscape, this will generally boost the saturation and contrast, although not uniformly across the colour spectrum, so you then may not need anyfurther adjustment. Just boosting the contrast slider is not necessarly going to give you the best results.

Alan


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Wilt
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Jul 07, 2013 12:47 |  #5

Just to show what contrast changes when in sun vs. in shade, affecting the diffuse inherent tonal range...

IMAGE: http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i63/wiltonw/POTN%202013%20Post%20Mar1/sunshade_zpsca9242fe.jpg

Left side shot in direct sun, right side shot in shade, exposure set for mid-tone (4th patch in bottom row), all post processing values identical for both shots in Lightroom. Lightroom eyedropper values sampled:
  • Sun: White = 92%, mid-tone = 56%, black = 10%
  • Shade: White = 93%, mid-tone = 56%, black = 8%


The contrast range of a shot may increase in sun due to reflectivity of shiny surfaces, but the diffuse surfaces (as shown in the above text) do not materially increase in contrast in direct sun...if anything, we see a bit more apparent contrast of white vs. black on the MacBeth Color Checker values in the shade! Interesting and puzzling...while we see that shots of flowers have more color saturation in the shade, the MacBeth test above seems to show better color saturation in the sunlight shot!

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IslandCrow
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Jul 08, 2013 11:12 |  #6

While shooting in the shade is almost always preferrable to shooting in harsh sunlight, that flat look you're talking about where the lighting is actually too uniform is certainly a drawback. To keep the photos from looking flat and dull, most photographers will add light back in using reflectors, strobes (generally with a soft box or umbrella) or both. If you don't have a reflector or artificial lighting with you, look for natural reflectors like a neutrally colored wall or even the pavement to help bounce some contrasting light back onto your model.

There are thousands of videos out there on outdoor portraits, so with a little searching on the web, you should be able to find some examples of what I'm talking about.




  
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jra
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Jul 09, 2013 15:49 |  #7

There are two types of contrast in photography, color contrast and tonal contrast. Shooting in the shade can certainly reduce tonal contrast and cause your subject to look dull and flat. As already mentioned, the way to combat this is to add some directional lighting in some form. Your goal is to create some additional contrast between your highlights and shadows that is often times lost in very non-directional lighting situations.




  
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shooting in the shade.. effects contrast?
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