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Thread started 23 Jul 2013 (Tuesday) 09:34
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Home Studio - Professionally?

 
wizard13
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Jul 23, 2013 16:06 |  #16

Thanks for the ideas!

charro callado wrote in post #16147239 (external link)
to 1 - lack of perceived credibility.

to 2 - ENORMOUS windows. I'm talking commercial grade, floor-to-ceiling, aluminum frame windows. The only thing after that would be a white concrete floor. /dreamspace


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wizard13
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Jul 23, 2013 16:09 |  #17

Like the grid idea! The sounds proofing is an interesting idea too.

I am planning to have a bay window area for some natural light stuff but be able to block the ambient. Interesting the different opinions on windows!

nathancarter wrote in post #16147279 (external link)
Hmm. I would NOT want windows; if you do put windows, you would also need heavy and secure drapes for those days where you DON'T want ambient light.

I would want:
- A large rolling garage door on one side, so you can open it to bring in large props and set dressing (or a car), or open it for "natural" directional light.

- Plenty of insulation & soundproofing in case you need to use the space for video shooting, or rent it to someone who does.

- A pipe grid on the ceiling for attaching lights and gear. Or a sliding track system like Manfrotto's, if you have a high budget.

- A dedicated, secure wardrobe & props room.

- A nice fenced sitting garden & fountain area out back. (too bad I don't have a green thumb)


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charro ­ callado
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Jul 23, 2013 16:13 |  #18

wizard13 wrote in post #16147312 (external link)
Like the grid idea! The sounds proofing is an interesting idea too.

I am planning to have a bay window area for some natural light stuff but be able to block the ambient. Interesting the different opinions on windows!

Windows can always be covered...but it's pretty hard to get light through drywall. A garage door is a decent second choice if you live somewhere warm all year (socal, southwest, etc)...otherwise it's going to get unbearably cold in the winter.




  
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wizard13
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Jul 23, 2013 17:09 |  #19

I am more north than you up here just outside of Buffalo. So thinking of the windows. The floor to ceiling is an interesting idea though...

charro callado wrote in post #16147323 (external link)
Windows can always be covered...but it's pretty hard to get light through drywall. A garage door is a decent second choice if you live somewhere warm all year (socal, southwest, etc)...otherwise it's going to get unbearably cold in the winter.


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Jul 23, 2013 17:46 |  #20

A lot of great ideas so far. A couple suggestions I have from the contractor side of my life. First is since you are in New York and have the temperature extremes that we have here, I would consider a separate heating/air conditioning system for the addition (if you haven't already.) I have seen/been in a lot of additions where they simply tap into the existing system and it is undersized and the room is over-sized (you are adding over 5,500 cubic feet of space to the structure) and the homeowners have trouble keeping the two spaces balanced. It would be 72 degrees in the main part of the house and their new great room is 84 degrees because it has a huge roof area, 3 outside walls, and only a couple ducts tapped off the existing ductwork. Or in the winter it's 10 degrees colder in the addition that the rest of the house for the same reasons.

Someone suggested a rolling door, but with your climate and depending on your needs, I would suggest a good double door, more energy efficient and better looking from both inside and outside. I did a studio for a biker friend years ago and he did quite a few shoots with motorcycles and he could open the double doors to get a bike in (or any larger props), and used it for ventilation or additional natural lighting.

As for windows, as someone said, you can block natural light easier than getting it in with no source. Again, from a contractors point of view and depending up where you live and what you expect, you probably want the addition to look like it belongs with the rest of the house rather than a stuck-on room, meaning matching the windows and general exterior design. Will help with resale down the road, and its general curb appeal. Good luck with your new studio, wish I was able to have a place to "play" like that.


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wizard13
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Jul 23, 2013 20:03 |  #21

Thanks for all the great suggestions!
I actually have already picked up some space heaters to help in the winter for that exact reason.
The planning is already keeping the addition in line with the existing houses structure. So the double door might be better than a 2nd garage.

Firemike wrote in post #16147548 (external link)
A lot of great ideas so far. A couple suggestions I have from the contractor side of my life. First is since you are in New York and have the temperature extremes that we have here, I would consider a separate heating/air conditioning system for the addition (if you haven't already.) I have seen/been in a lot of additions where they simply tap into the existing system and it is undersized and the room is over-sized (you are adding over 5,500 cubic feet of space to the structure) and the homeowners have trouble keeping the two spaces balanced. It would be 72 degrees in the main part of the house and their new great room is 84 degrees because it has a huge roof area, 3 outside walls, and only a couple ducts tapped off the existing ductwork. Or in the winter it's 10 degrees colder in the addition that the rest of the house for the same reasons.

Someone suggested a rolling door, but with your climate and depending on your needs, I would suggest a good double door, more energy efficient and better looking from both inside and outside. I did a studio for a biker friend years ago and he did quite a few shoots with motorcycles and he could open the double doors to get a bike in (or any larger props), and used it for ventilation or additional natural lighting.

As for windows, as someone said, you can block natural light easier than getting it in with no source. Again, from a contractors point of view and depending up where you live and what you expect, you probably want the addition to look like it belongs with the rest of the house rather than a stuck-on room, meaning matching the windows and general exterior design. Will help with resale down the road, and its general curb appeal. Good luck with your new studio, wish I was able to have a place to "play" like that.


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Jul 24, 2013 06:13 |  #22

wizard13 wrote in post #16146100 (external link)
1- What are some pitfalls that people fall into when they launch their photography business from a home studio?


Make sure the local zoning authorities will allow you to run a studio out of your home and do remember to be sure your studios access and bath/makeup room meets the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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wizard13
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Jul 24, 2013 08:41 |  #23

Thanks for the suggestion.
The zoning board has no problem. I will look into the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Thanks!

Channel One wrote in post #16149083 (external link)
Make sure the local zoning authorities will allow you to run a studio out of your home and do remember to be sure your studios access and bath/makeup room meets the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Wayne


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wizard13
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Jul 26, 2013 07:59 |  #24

Thanks for all the suggestions everyone!
Any other ideas out there?


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Jul 27, 2013 00:43 |  #25

One of the main issues (IMO) is a home based studio can give the impression of non-professionalism. This is certainly not always the case and it depends much upon the property you have to work with. For instance, there's a big difference between leading a client through your home to a spare bedroom or a basement as opposed to having a dedicated studio space with its own entrance. IMO, a home based studio can work quite well and appear very professional if it can be successfully separated from the living space while maintaining a professional appearance (don't lead people through your cellar storm door to reach your "studio" in the basement with unfinished 6ft high ceilings and dirt floors).




  
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Jul 27, 2013 07:58 |  #26

Thanks for the opinion!
I am actually building an addition on the side of the house so clients will have a separate entrance into the studio and not have to enter the actual house at all.

jra wrote in post #16157433 (external link)
One of the main issues (IMO) is a home based studio can give the impression of non-professionalism. This is certainly not always the case and it depends much upon the property you have to work with. For instance, there's a big difference between leading a client through your home to a spare bedroom or a basement as opposed to having a dedicated studio space with its own entrance. IMO, a home based studio can work quite well and appear very professional if it can be successfully separated from the living space while maintaining a professional appearance (don't lead people through your cellar storm door to reach your "studio" in the basement with unfinished 6ft high ceilings and dirt floors).


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Jul 28, 2013 07:36 |  #27

wizard13 wrote in post #16155200 (external link)
Any other ideas out there?

Talk to your contractor about adding outlets beyond what is required by code (the six foot rule) by doubling up the standard single duplex outlets to double duplex outlets and also do have more than one branch circuit for them as well.


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wizard13
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Jul 28, 2013 08:18 |  #28

Thanks! I was planning to have more outlets but the extra circuits make sense. Will have to do that.

Channel One wrote in post #16160201 (external link)
Talk to your contractor about adding outlets beyond what is required by code (the six foot rule) by doubling up the standard single duplex outlets to double duplex outlets and also do have more than one branch circuit for them as well.


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Jul 28, 2013 11:25 |  #29

Also consider where your electrical panel is in relation to your studio.

While you should be wired well beyond your expected load, it does suck to have an equipment failure that trips the breaker and force you to go wandering through your house to get to the panel.

If possible, add as much headroom as you reasonably can. It is easy to build a false ceiling if you want something low for a shot. It is a lot harder to raise a ceiling after the fact.


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Jul 28, 2013 11:58 |  #30

The main break is completely on the other side of the house from where the studio will be built. I am considering putting in a subpanel right in the studio to hopefully prevent that exact problem.
I am planning on having 12ft ceilings. Is that what you are referring to with reasonable headroom?
Thanks for the input!

Luckless wrote in post #16160682 (external link)
Also consider where your electrical panel is in relation to your studio.

While you should be wired well beyond your expected load, it does suck to have an equipment failure that trips the breaker and force you to go wandering through your house to get to the panel.

If possible, add as much headroom as you reasonably can. It is easy to build a false ceiling if you want something low for a shot. It is a lot harder to raise a ceiling after the fact.


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