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Thread started 23 Jul 2013 (Tuesday) 09:34
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Home Studio - Professionally?

 
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Jul 28, 2013 12:08 |  #31

wizard13 wrote in post #16160758 (external link)
The main break is completely on the other side of the house from where the studio will be built. I am considering putting in a subpanel right in the studio to hopefully prevent that exact problem.

If you home has an attic installing that sub panel may very well be the least expensive and proper method of powering your studio.

Doing so allows you down the road to sub meter the studio to determing power usage for tax purposes.

I am planning on having 12ft ceilings. Is that what you are referring to with reasonable headroom? Thanks for the input!

I would consider 12 to be a minimum for a studio but the maximum practical for home, you want a studio but it should be built to add value to your home as well.

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wizard13
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Jul 28, 2013 15:21 |  #32

The attic is just blown insulation. I was thinking of going through the wood base just above the basement cement wall. Then running the lines along the ceiling of the basement to the other side. The basement is unfinished to easy access. Thanks for the tips!!

Channel One wrote in post #16160783 (external link)
If you home has an attic installing that sub panel may very well be the least expensive and proper method of powering your studio.

Doing so allows you down the road to sub meter the studio to determing power usage for tax purposes.



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Jul 28, 2013 16:05 |  #33

I have heard that many potential clients will be reluctant to go into what is essentially somebody else's home. Fear the person might be a Hannibal Lecter, and so on. Maybe be irrational, yes, but many people are.


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Jul 28, 2013 16:27 |  #34

Channel One wrote in post #16160783 (external link)
I would consider 12 to be a minimum for a studio but the maximum practical for home, you want a studio but it should be built to add value to your home as well.

Wayne

That is a very good point for designing something used for home business: "What can this space be used as by someone else when the property is sold"

Talk to your designer about alternative space usage, and probable changes to door/window placement. Depending on the style of the exterior, layout of the space, and layout of the property, then framing suitable headers ahead of time can be a nice 'check box' a realtor can use to move your property. This can so so far as to adding footings for a fireplace. "We have the ground work for all these features to be put in as an easy renovation. This makes them an easy job with minimal work, whereas without them it would be far more costly and time consuming to put in place."


I've seen someone who went so far as to design a home business extension to his house as two stories, but in such as way as to allow the second story floor to be constructed after the fact. (Even wired all the 'rooms' on the second story with electrical outlets and empty lighting boxes.) While only needing about half again as much head room for the lift he was using, designing it that way meant he added a pair of bedrooms onto the house in a weekend when it came time to sell.

Not saying everyone should follow that route, but planning things like a 'storage loft' above a 'family room' can easily give you a good excuse to stretch ceilings well beyond 'normal' with a positive impact on resale value.


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Jul 28, 2013 16:52 |  #35

Luckless wrote in post #16161422 (external link)
Not saying everyone should follow that route, but planning things like a 'storage loft' above a 'family room' can easily give you a good excuse to stretch ceilings well beyond 'normal' with a positive impact on resale value.

I have a friend who has a two story with cathedral ceilings in the living and dining room that are literally 18 feet at the peak, in other words a lot of open not usable space.

He built a loft that began over the kitchen and extended out over the living room with a rail around it, the height is kinda low, as an adult you have to duck to walk around up there, but you want to guess where his children and now his grandchildren hang out?

Wayne


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RickyH
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Jul 28, 2013 17:19 |  #36

photoguy6405 wrote in post #16161350 (external link)
I have heard that many potential clients will be reluctant to go into what is essentially somebody else's home. Fear the person might be a Hannibal Lecter, and so on. Maybe be irrational, yes, but many people are.

I have often wondered about this problem myself. I eventually want to open/build my own studio as an add on to my home. When thinking about this issue, I thought that posting photos of my studio on my website. That way, people can see exactly the type of set up that I have & know what they are walking into.

Good luck with everything! Please continue to post updates throughout the process. I would love to be able to learn from your building process.


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wizard13
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Jul 28, 2013 22:12 |  #37

Thanks for all the comments everyone.

I am planning to have the exterior match the existing house for resale purposes. But the idea of a rough in for a fire place is a good one! Thanks!

Interesting idea about two stories with the 'upstairs' wired and ready but just needing floors. Will have to think about that one-

And I was planning to place a picture on the site of the exterior of the studio so people know what to expect and don't drive by thinking it cannot be a house.

Hopefully there are more ideas out there. This has all been really helpful so far.
Thanks!!!


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Jul 31, 2013 13:39 |  #38

charro callado wrote in post #16147323 (external link)
Windows can always be covered...but it's pretty hard to get light through drywall. A garage door is a decent second choice if you live somewhere warm all year (socal, southwest, etc)...otherwise it's going to get unbearably cold in the winter.

Same is true for white walls. Cutting light is always easier than gaining it.




  
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