Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Transportation Talk 
Thread started 28 Aug 2013 (Wednesday) 14:15
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

How Do You Shoot a Black Car

 
gfspencer
Member
179 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 17
Joined Dec 2008
     
Aug 28, 2013 14:15 |  #1

How do you shoot a black shinny car? I'm getting too many reflections.


Canon 50D - Canon 7DII - Canon 6D - 16-35mm f/2.8L - 24-105mm f/4[COLOR="red"]L IS - 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS - 50mm f/1.2L - 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 DO IS - 100-400mm II f/4.5-5.6L IS - Extender EF 2x

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
PhotosGuy
Moderator
Avatar
75,867 posts
Gallery: 8 photos
Likes: 2517
Joined Feb 2004
Location: Middle of Michigan
     
Aug 28, 2013 15:34 |  #2

It's a common problem. See the "Move your feet" link in my sig? Then find a location that doesn't compete with the car for our attention. Even a lowly Cruzecan look pretty good. ; )


FrankC - 20D, RAW, Manual everything...
Classic Carz, Racing, Air Show, Flowers.
Find the light... A few Car Lighting Tips, and MOVE YOUR FEET!
Have you thought about making your own book? // Need an exposure crutch?
New Image Size Limits: Image must not exceed 1600 pixels on any side.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jjphoto
Member
Avatar
187 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2010
Location: Melbourne
     
Aug 29, 2013 01:21 |  #3

You need to consider everything around the car that will reflect in the panels. You can't just make the reflections disappear, except with Photoshop, and using a polarising filter can help but it has it's disadvantages too. Some times the best option is to shoot in very open locations, ie where there is little to reflect in the panels.

What, you don't have a studio to shoot cars!

IMAGE: http://photocornucopia.com/images/Automotive/l_114_2_pc_400.jpg
Try sunset in an open location.
IMAGE: http://photocornucopia.com/images/Automotive/l_285_pc_400.jpg
Light painting can work well too, but you still need to take care of reflections.
IMAGE: http://photocornucopia.com/images/Automotive/l_273_pc_400.jpg

PhotoCornucopia.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
cjdexter
Member
137 posts
Joined Jan 2012
Location: Australia
     
Sep 02, 2013 00:58 |  #4

From my experience (a black car owner & automotive photography enthusiast) black cars don't respond well to strobes or flashes. You really need some sunrise/sunset, hazy goodness type of light or light paint it. CPL should always help too.


-CJ-
Canon 60D + 18-55mm (+Reverse Adapter) + 55-250mm + Ʃ 24-70mm f/2.8 + Ʃ 30mm f/1.4 + Ʃ 10-20mm f/3.5 + 430EX II

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
shootingdave
Member
Avatar
74 posts
Likes: 2
Joined May 2013
Location: London
     
Sep 02, 2013 03:14 |  #5

Personally I have found that shooting a Black Shiny car works best on an overcast day.

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8233/8354967698_f74b1a5b39.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com/​photos/dav3design/8354​967698/  (external link)
A Day At The Pod (external link) by Shooting Dave (external link), on Flickr

For the above image I used a CPL filter to control the reflections and took multiple exposures and combined them where needed.

Canon 5D MkIII | Canon 50D | Canon 50mm f/1.4 USM | Canon 135mm f/2 L USM | Canon 70-200mm f/4 L USM
ShootingDave (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
lusospeed
Member
Avatar
181 posts
Likes: 9
Joined Dec 2012
Location: pennsylvania
     
Sep 02, 2013 10:31 |  #6

Shooting on an overcast day is probably a good idea, however, there are different levels of overcast. If you have an overcast day where the sky is even that is probably the best and will act as a huge softbox. Overcast with clouds that are darker and lighter in some areas will especially make the top of the car look horrible. One method that also goes a long way is to polarize the top and the side of the car and then combine exposures. The other option is as mentioned above, to use early morning or late afternoon light in an area that is wide open and doesn't cast any harsh reflections. A clean horizon line on the side of the car is perhaps the best option when shooting in low light.


http://www.lusospeed.c​om (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,523 views & 0 likes for this thread
How Do You Shoot a Black Car
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Transportation Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is kcole1
1962 guests, 340 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.