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Thread started 04 Jan 2014 (Saturday) 14:12
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1,2,3,4 TB drives?

 
phantelope
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Jan 04, 2014 14:12 |  #1

My 1TB drive is basically full (as is the backup of course) so I need to expand. I might finally get my act together and figure out this RAID thing (I have online backup with CrashPlan, so it's not ultra important to have this extra level of security.

But, what size of drive to buy? It's tempting to get 2 or 4TB drives so I don't have to deal with this again for a while, but I read somewhere that the larger ones simply have more disks (and readers and mechanics) in them, which adds a bit of possible failure chance. Or is it comparable to having four 1TB drives (with all their mechanics etc)?

I'd like to have at least 2TB (and the same as backup), should I go to 4? It's less of a price issue to me, more a reliability and clutter on my desk issue.


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mike_d
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Jan 04, 2014 15:54 |  #2

I'd buy two 4TB drives of different brands. Work from one, backup to the other.




  
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phantelope
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Jan 04, 2014 16:05 |  #3

that's an interesting idea I'd not have considered, thanks!


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John ­ from ­ PA
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Jan 04, 2014 17:18 |  #4

Do you really need ready access to all those images? I'd get a good cataloging program and start burning to DVD. It's lot of work now, but as you move forward if you do this on a regular basis it isn't a difficult task. Just remember FIFO, first in first out.




  
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phantelope
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Jan 04, 2014 17:53 |  #5

I don't trust DVDs in the long run (unless one uses the expensive archival ones) and I do go back frequently with the family photos, so yes. And it's all in one place, not a binder or something full of DVDs, I'm afraid I'm not organized enough to keep something like that organized...

ETA: I'd also need quite a pile of DVDs to backup almost 1TB of files and would have to change my LR catalog to reflect this so I can find the files.


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Jan 04, 2014 18:20 |  #6

I have 2 3tb drives. One working and the other one backs up certain folders using Chronosync. I also have another 2tb drive for miscellaneous files.


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Jan 04, 2014 19:11 |  #7

Modern drives have higher storage densities per platter, so an old 1tb drives might have 4 discs inside at 250gb per disc, where as a new one might do the same but on 2 discs. Drives from the same model line that are all modern, for example the Western digital Green line, do indeed increase capacity by adding more internal platters, from what I know platter density is about 750gb-1tb per platter atm.

If you are looking at RAID, don't bother with RAID 5, RAID1 or RAID 1+0 however are good.

Buying two drives, and using one to back up the other (manually or via a backup program) is probably the best bang for your buck, however there are a few things to consider. Where do you store your second drive? If there both in your computer and it gets stolen or broken etc, there goes your backup along with original. If you have the backup as an external drive, and your house burns down, it's the same case.

Ideally, if you can afford to do it, and the data is worth enough to you, having an on location backup as well as an off location backup is the way to go.


Looking quickly online, 3tb drives, followed closely by 4tb are the best $/TB.


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phantelope
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Jan 04, 2014 19:44 |  #8

thanks! Might go for two 4TB. I backup online too with CrashPlan and have yet an other copy at my wife's work in case the house burns down the same day CrashPlan shuts down :-)


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Jan 04, 2014 23:43 |  #9

John from PA wrote in post #16577766 (external link)
Do you really need ready access to all those images? I'd get a good cataloging program and start burning to DVD. It's lot of work now, but as you move forward if you do this on a regular basis it isn't a difficult task. Just remember FIFO, first in first out.

DVDs are painfully slow and not terribly reliable as an archival storage medium. That 4 TB hard drive holds as much as 850 single layer DVDs. Who wants to burn 1700 DVDs (gotta have at least one duplicate), then index and physically store them all? You're better off just buying a big enough hard drive for your needs and backing it up a couple of different ways. One on-site backup + an offsite backup like Crashplan, as the threadstarter is doing, is a good system.




  
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ImCBParker
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Jan 04, 2014 23:59 |  #10

I cannot recommend going to a a NAS/RAID drive system enough. I was sick of constantly swapping external hard drives, then I bought a Drobo a couple years ago and I do not know what I would do without it. If it dies, I can buy a new one and just put the existing drives in. There are lots of cheap alternatives out there. It will cost more up front than an external drive, but it scales a lot better.


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drvnbysound
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Jan 05, 2014 00:46 |  #11

ImCBParker wrote in post #16578568 (external link)
I cannot recommend going to a a NAS/RAID drive system enough. I was sick of constantly swapping external hard drives, then I bought a Drobo a couple years ago and I do not know what I would do without it. If it dies, I can buy a new one and just put the existing drives in. There are lots of cheap alternatives out there. It will cost more up front than an external drive, but it scales a lot better.

Drobo failures can be terrible...
http://scottkelby.com/​2012/im-done-with-drobo/ (external link)
http://scottkelby.com …m-drobo-ceo-tom-buiocchi/ (external link)
http://scottkelby.com/​2012/my-life-after-drobo/ (external link)


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drvnbysound
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Jan 05, 2014 00:47 |  #12

Personally, I'm soon to build my own software RAID (~8TB) machine for my media server, but honestly don't want to deal with putting my pictures into a RAID. I'm going to end up getting (priorities) a desktop docking station for internal HDDs, and store images direct to those drives.


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ImCBParker
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Jan 05, 2014 01:02 |  #13

Well aware of Kelby's issues, he is one guy. Go to any review site and look at the positive reviews vs. negative. Overwhelmingly positive, more so than most external devices. I certainly get the skepticism if Kelby was my only resource.

I have not had one drive go bad in either of my Drobos. Ditto for the handful of other photographers I know that use them. Any hard drive failures can be terrible. There are plenty of RAID/NAS devices besides Drobos. Given their prices are in consumer reach, is truly is the best scalable option for large data collections. Individual hard drives are fine up to their capacity, but like all external drives, good luck when either their boards or drives fail.


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mike_d
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Jan 05, 2014 01:23 |  #14

RAID is not a backup. Repeat x 10.

As long as everyone knows that you still need to backup your data, RAID/NAS devices can be very useful. Almost all of my data lives on a Synology NAS. I have 3 backups.




  
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ImCBParker
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Jan 05, 2014 01:27 |  #15

mike_d wrote in post #16578668 (external link)
RAID is not a backup. Repeat x 10.

As long as everyone knows that you still need to backup your data, RAID/NAS devices can be very useful. Almost all of my data lives on a Synology NAS. I have 3 backups.

It is not technically a back up, but by definition it creates a redundancy that helps in the event of a single drive failure.

I have heard very good things about the Synology devices as well.


Canon 5DIII, 7D, 40D, 8-14L, 24-70 f2.8L, 70-200 f2.8L IS, 24L, 50L, 85 f1.8, 100L, 135L, 1.4 Extender, Tokina 16-28 f2.8, and too many lights and accessories to list.
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