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Thread started 24 Feb 2014 (Monday) 13:45
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My Angel in High Key

 
joedlh
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Feb 25, 2014 18:49 |  #16

max3k wrote in post #16714012 (external link)
Keep trying. Those shots are at least 2 stops over exposed.

Dude. Look up what it means to be high key. These shots are perfect examples. And well done too.


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Feb 25, 2014 18:50 |  #17

Beautifully executed and definitely print worthy. That's a lovely little girl and will have to try something like this with my granddaughters.


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joedlh
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Feb 25, 2014 18:51 |  #18

Staszek wrote in post #16717269 (external link)
Cute daughter, but high key does not mean overexposed.

[Sigh] Wrong. Do a little research on what high key actually is. These are excellent examples.


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joedlh
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Feb 25, 2014 18:54 |  #19

LisaJH wrote in post #16717268 (external link)
Your daughter is gorgeous and I can see why you love these, but they are not going to print well. The skin tones will print like one giant blob with no detail. :(

It amazes me how few people realize what exactly a high key shot is. Detail is not the point at all. Not every shot has to be exactly in the center of the histogram. These are very well executed and no doubt will make memorable prints.


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Staszek
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Feb 25, 2014 19:01 |  #20

BrianAZ wrote in post #16717484 (external link)
Nope, but neither does a "properly" exposed image. High key is denoted by the values of the subject, backgound, and other elements. Even without overexposure this would be classified as high key.

You're correct, High Key relates to the white nature of the scene, including background, subject, and amount of shadows. It does not mean that everything has to be blown out. Regardless, it's not my cup of tea, but if you like it, keep on chuggin'!

joedlh wrote in post #16717493 (external link)
Dude. Look up what it means to be high key. These shots are perfect examples. And well done too.

See below.

joedlh wrote in post #16717501 (external link)
[Sigh] Wrong. Do a little research on what high key actually is. These are excellent examples.

Quoted from Wikipedia (external link):

High-key lighting is a style of lighting for film, television, or photography that aims to reduce the lighting ratio present in the scene. This was originally done partly for technological reasons, since early film and television did not deal well with high contrast ratios, but now is used to suggest an upbeat mood. It is often used in sitcoms and comedies. High-key lighting is usually quite homogeneous and free from dark shadows. The terminology comes from the key light (main light).

And another quote from DPS (external link):

High key photography is challenging because it requires you to create an intentionally overexposed background while still properly exposing your subject. Once you learn how to use exposure compensation and light your background, you’ll be able to create perfect white backgrounds in just a few minutes.

Looks like maybe you should do some research on these basic lighting concepts before dismissing other professionals and amateurs on the forum.


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Canon_Matt
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Feb 26, 2014 03:35 |  #21

Understand what you are trying to achieve, but you have missed it here, in my opinion. High key should not be devoid of detail. It just looks like a floating head.

When you try and print these, the blown out areas will be out of range and ink won't be put down so the picture will look odd.


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Feb 26, 2014 10:24 |  #22

Brian, these are very well done. I love the tones you kept and the result is great. I've printed similar type of shots on canvas and love the look and feel you get from them. Keep at it, some will criticize w/o ever doing it themselves. So their feedback is based on what a book or internet fact tells them rather than experience.
Ultimately the images were for you, you like them and that is what matters. Great job.


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BrianAZ
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Feb 26, 2014 12:11 |  #23

Reading some of the feedback here was both depressing and very uplifting at the same time.

For the "haters", I get it. No, this is not textbook technique. However, I rarely like textbook technique. To me, portraiture is about connecting with the image, and emotional impact. Sure, I could have just exposed them at f/13, or dropped the lights down to read f/8. But to me, the overexposure relay feeling of childish innocence that normal exposure looses. Similarly, I wouldn't shoot an adult in this fashion, and rarely shoot seniors like this either. While the effect is similar, the impact is lost as well as the connection. I learn the techniques, so I can figure out which ones I need to break at times to get the impact I want.

I've been shooting kids like this for years. In fact, I try to shoot this setup for every child session as it is a great seller. I have a 36" print hanging on my studio wall, and moms just love it. While it may not bee exactly how all of us shoot, it woks for me and my clients.

Some of the comments on this forum anymore are just depressing. It seems that people are often looking for reasons to make negative comments. I'm assuming it makes some people feel better about their own work to criticize others. What saddens me most is that people seem to focus on the less important (e.g. what the textbooks claim is proper technique), and miss out entirely on the art being produced. Cropping into someone head, camera tilt, etc. are often intentional and the comments often miss the point of artistic expression at all.

For the High Key commenters, there is a difference between high key lighting and a high key image. This image is both a high key image, and uses high key lighting. A high key image has the large dominance of tones rendered above mid grey. High key lighting is associated with low ratios and lack of shadow details. You can shoot with high key lighting in a low key image (see Doug Box photos for examples where he shoots using only a ringlight on a black background). Don't confuse a white background alone as denoting a high key image. The example below isn't high key, but uses high key lighting(her shirt isn't above mid grey, and in fact was well below mid grey as I changed the color of her shirt from a dark green to grey in post):

IMAGE: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3571/3518874512_3856fa6927_o.jpg

The next example is high key:
IMAGE: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3333/3514561464_ab50c6e634_o.jpg

Different techniques for different intentions...

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HiepBuiPhotography
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Feb 26, 2014 12:31 |  #24

Brian, I think you're thinking about the comments too much. Some will like it, some won't. That's just how it is.

I am one of those who don't like the photo. Apart from the high key, low key, blah blah blah photography terms, it's simply unpleasant for my eyes to look at. Period. Now, does that have any weight at all? No. Will it change how you think of your photo? No. It's your photo. You do as you wish. But sharing the photo on the forum allows me to voice my opinion. :D Continue sharing!


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Canon_Matt
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Feb 26, 2014 22:23 |  #25

I'm not commenting simply to be negative. Just saying how I see it.

I understand what you're saying though. So people right across this site can't be constructive and just need to put peoples work down.

Personally I feel they are off the mark. The first thing that appeared to me was just a floating head. That's my first impression. In terms of skin tone, you did quite well.

I've not ventured to look at any of your other work but I'm sure you produce some great stuff, keep it up.


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My Angel in High Key
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