Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Transportation 
Thread started 26 Feb 2014 (Wednesday) 11:11
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Another old parisian bus, the Brillié-Schneider P2

 
Dopey
Goldmember
Avatar
1,132 posts
Likes: 91
Joined Jan 2014
Location: France
     
Feb 26, 2014 11:11 |  #1

We have had this morning an interesting discussion about the museum of old buses (AMTUIR) and this makes me think to show you another very old bus.

It's the Brillié-Schneider P2 built in 1906.
As you can see the general shape is very close to the shape of the omnibus towed by horses which were used until the beginning of 20th century.

IMAGE: http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/41533195B1.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net/viewer.php?id=415​33195B1.jpg  (external link)

IMAGE: http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/98229368B9.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net/viewer.php?id=982​29368B9.jpg  (external link)

IMAGE: http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/87955040B2.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net/viewer.php?id=879​55040B2.jpg  (external link)

IMAGE: http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/74524797B3.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net/viewer.php?id=745​24797B3.jpg  (external link)

We may almost say that the reins were replaced by a steering Wheel...
IMAGE: http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/34035045B4.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net/viewer.php?id=340​35045B4.jpg  (external link)

The tyres are not inflatable, they are full (I'm not sure it's the right word in English... )
IMAGE: http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/94005291B5.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net/viewer.php?id=940​05291B5.jpg  (external link)

The engine is a four cylinder 35HP
IMAGE: http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/20729550B6.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net/viewer.php?id=207​29550B6.jpg  (external link)

IMAGE: http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/59080182B7.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net/viewer.php?id=590​80182B7.jpg  (external link)
.

Bernard

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Dopey
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,132 posts
Likes: 91
Joined Jan 2014
Location: France
     
Feb 26, 2014 11:14 |  #2

There is no electric starter so, as did this man, you have to turn the crank handle to start this 108 years old engine. But once started it turns like a swiss clock !

IMAGE: http://img11.hostingpics.net/pics/26497464B8.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net/viewer.php?id=264​97464B8.jpg  (external link)
.

Bernard

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
PhotosGuy
Moderator
Avatar
75,711 posts
Gallery: 8 photos
Likes: 2407
Joined Feb 2004
Location: Middle of Michigan
     
Feb 26, 2014 11:44 |  #3

Good shots of it. Nice timing on the cranking image, too!


FrankC - 20D, RAW, Manual everything...
Classic Carz, Racing, Air Show, Flowers.
Find the light... A few Car Lighting Tips, and MOVE YOUR FEET!
Have you thought about making your own book? // Need an exposure crutch?
New Image Size Limits: Image must not exceed 1600 pixels on any side.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Dopey
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,132 posts
Likes: 91
Joined Jan 2014
Location: France
     
Feb 26, 2014 14:14 as a reply to  @ PhotosGuy's post |  #4

Thank you Frank !

About the last one, I found it was funny to use a slow exposure. The man who turned the crank handle found the situation less funny because the engine was a litlle capricious and he turned and turned during at last five minutes... But what a smile on his face when the engine started !!! :D


Bernard

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lesmore
Senior Member
874 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Jan 2011
     
Feb 26, 2014 17:50 |  #5

Interesting pictures of these old buses. Looking at the suspension leaf springs, the solid (no air) tires and the extremely heavy duty construction of the frames, engine components, steering box, etc...tells me these buses were built to last.

I bet that was quite an engine to turn over. The compression ratio of an engine that old, wouldn't be high...but the cubic capacity of that engine must be huge and take some effort to get that crankshaft moving.

Bernard, France seems to be a great place for special interest vehicles of all sorts.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Dopey
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,132 posts
Likes: 91
Joined Jan 2014
Location: France
     
Feb 27, 2014 01:36 as a reply to  @ Lesmore's post |  #6

It's true that in France there are many museums dedicated to the technical heritage, but I think that it's common to all industrialized countries, not particular to France.
I'm not a great traveler but enough to note that I saw many examples like this bus museum in western countries and never in countries less advanced or being developing.
It's not their fault, I think that these countries have, for the moment, not enough possibilities, time, money and opportunities to devote them to this task.
I'm sure that there are in these countries many people like us, who would like to preserve and maintain their technical heritage, but they have not the means in time and money.
But, I'm afraid for many of them it's too late, and even if they reach at last the financial ease which allows to give time for preservation, there is no more anything to restore...
For instance in China it's almost a miracle to find any really old architectural heritage excepted the main ones (forbidden city, some temples etc etc) because nearly all has been destroyed during the first half of XXth century. So, concerning technical heritage...:cry:

To come back to this bus in spite of some research I didn't find any technical informations excepted 4 cylinder 35 HP. Nothing about compression ratio for instance.
I suppose as you that the compression ration was not very high, it was not possible at this time.
However I have found some interesting photos of this period ! :D

IMAGE: http://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/630591autobus.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net ….php?id=630591a​utobus.jpg  (external link)

IMAGE: http://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/515869BrillieSchneiderP21906182.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net …lieSchneiderP21​906182.jpg  (external link)

IMAGE: http://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/475499BrillieSchneiderP21906180.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.hostingpics​.net …lieSchneiderP21​906180.jpg  (external link)
.

Bernard

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lesmore
Senior Member
874 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Jan 2011
     
Feb 27, 2014 16:52 |  #7

Attached a picture (not mine) of some buses in my city during a huge blizzard, back in the 1960's. Travel was eventually shut down, which is unusual as no matter the winter conditions things rarely shut down here.

When I was a teenager (1960's), I used to work for the city transit system. City buses we used were GM, Canadian Car, Flxible and I think we were the only place in North America that had a few Mitsubishi buses...they had very big diesel V8's. The buses were generally 90-95 passenger units...this would include those sitting down and standing.

The climate here, can range from -40 C to 40 + C and we usually have winters from early November till early April and the snow/ice usually stays all winter without much melting.

So the buses have to be very well built to survive.

http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com …5a4ae2b39e6a8bb​6473d1.jpg (external link)

It's true that in France there are many museums dedicated to the technical heritage, but I think that it's common to all industrialized countries, not particular to France.We have a lot of museums, but not as many vehicle museums here as I would like. We also have a lot of vintage car enthusiasts who display their cars in the summer. Not unusual to have 150-200 cars at a show sometimes. Occasionally many more if there is a special event. Most of the cars are vintage American, hot rods and classic.
I'm not a great traveler but enough to note that I saw many examples like this bus museum in western countries and never in countries less advanced or being developing.
It's not their fault, I think that these countries have, for the moment, not enough possibilities, time, money and opportunities to devote them to this task.
I'm sure that there are in these countries many people like us, who would like to preserve and maintain their technical heritage, but they have not the means in time and money.

I agree. We are very lucky in the G8 countries to have sufficient disposable money to use on our hobbies.
But, I'm afraid for many of them it's too late, and even if they reach at last the financial ease which allows to give time for preservation, there is no more anything to restore...
For instance in China it's almost a miracle to find any really old architectural heritage excepted the main ones (forbidden city, some temples etc etc) because nearly all has been destroyed during the first half of XXth century. So, concerning technical heritage...

I find in North America, that although some grand old buildings have been torn down there have been efforts made to maintain and rebuild older buildings that have heritage.

To come back to this bus in spite of some research I didn't find any technical informations excepted 4 cylinder 35 HP. Nothing about compression ratio for instance.I would think that the torque of that bus engine would be considerable due to it's large capacity. Thanks for checking on the tech info.
I suppose as you that the compression ration was not very high, it was not possible at this time.
However I have found some interesting photos of this period !
Wonderful photos. They provide an idea of motor life back in earlier years.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,960 views & 0 likes for this thread
Another old parisian bus, the Brillié-Schneider P2
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Transportation 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is fred406
1111 guests, 274 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.