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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 27 Mar 2014 (Thursday) 14:01
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Frustrated (Studio lights)

 
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Mar 27, 2014 18:11 |  #16

Moin wrote in post #16790739 (external link)
So I borrowed couple of Indian studio lights, these

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from a friend and I can't get 1 good picture with them. I've used umbrellas, diffusers with different setups but nop. 2 things, I don't have a soft/octabox (hence the umbrella + double tracing paper diffuser) or a large room where I'm shooting, how much does that matter?

Also, when I'm shooting with 'lamp only mode', It gives a warm'ish feeling which is "workable" but not good enough.

This is my first time playing with Studio lights so any tip to get me one or two good pictures/setup would be awesome.

Part of the process of learning how to use strobes is learning how to adjust them for correct exposure. That generally requires a flash meter.

There are many different kinds of meters (external link) at many prices, (external link) but all of them, if used correctly, will allow a correct exposure.

And, of course, you're learning the hard way with no previous experience that a camera must use specific exposure settings for each setup using external strobes. From your message you also learned that strobes' modeling lights don't work the same as the main lights.

You're discovering what many other photographers have learned in the era of electronic strobes: lighting is the most difficult aspect of photography to learn and to master. There is no easy or fast way to figure out the use of strobes. The kind of equipment you use is far less important than the manner in which that equipment is used.

Effective usage of photo lighting is like effective use of a violin. Expect to spend a long time learning and practicing.

A first step to understanding lighting is to find a printed reference. Get one or more of the publications at this link (external link). Be prepared to spend long hours studying what you'll find in those books.

You also may benefit from study with a human teacher or mentor.




  
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Mar 27, 2014 18:33 |  #17

gonzogolf wrote in post #16791013 (external link)
Nothing I said relies on your turning the power down. Get closer, and adjust your aperture accordingly, and watch the background get darker.

This

Turn the power to half, set your ISO to 100, stick a piece of white paper at the subject location, adjust your aperture til you are 2/3 of a stop under seeing blinkies from highlight alert in your LCD. That should give you a pretty good exposure to work with.


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Mar 27, 2014 18:42 |  #18

Moin wrote in post #16791006 (external link)
Yep, unfortunately, I can't control power on these lights, there's no slider. Only half or full power and it throws an immense burst even on half. The only way I can use these is when I've turned the lights flash off and am using the continuous modeling lamps.

You can control the amount of light your putting on the subject just like you can change the perspective of a shot when using a prime lens. With your feet. Move the lights.


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Mar 27, 2014 18:43 |  #19

Cute pup by the way.


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Moin
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Mar 27, 2014 19:03 |  #20

Agree with everyone. I definitely need to play more with strobes.


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Mar 28, 2014 23:01 |  #21

Google for "Inverse Square Law of Light, photography" and read up a little on that - that is what Scatterbrained is talking about. Control the power and fall off of light via distance and aperture (again, Inverse Square Law)




  
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Frustrated (Studio lights)
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
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