Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 29 May 2014 (Thursday) 14:02
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

CMYK for web?

 
Naraly
Member
Avatar
221 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Feb 2012
Location: California
     
May 29, 2014 14:02 |  #1

For a while now I have resized images that I will use for uploading to the web a certain way, which is to size it in photoshop at 1236 pixels on the long side, and then take a screen shot of the image. I have tried "save as" with those dimensions & compared but the quality of screen shot is much better (especially in the eyes, they don't get pixelated). Anyways, it saves the screen shot as a PNG on my mac, but I never noticed until today that it converts it from an sRGB (how I had it in photoshop) to a CMYK color. I didn't know what that is so I researched it, and to my understanding CMYK is not for web, only for print, because it overly-saturates the images? On my screen when I open the sRGB and screenshot image the colors look the same. When I upload online I only notice the screen shot image to be a tiny bit more saturated, but I don't know if this is just my monitor? I know everyone's monitors are calibrated differently so we might not all see the same, but I just want to know how most of the people see it :confused:


Here on the left is an image saved in sRGB as a JPEG sized
at 1236pixels in height and 114DPI. (Don't mind the actual photo
& composition, it's a trashed image & I cropped it randomly to
just use as test)

IMAGE: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3668/14113303658_49784aedec_z.jpg
IMAGE: https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2932/14299392264_9023d2b208_z.jpg
And on the right is the screenshot version. sized at
1236pixels in height and 114DPI sRGB in photoshop, and then took
a screenshot that saved on my computer as a PNG in CMYK color.



I do notice there's a bit more vibrance in the screenshot image, but I never thought of it to be overly saturated, but I don't know if it's just my screen?

Maybe I'm just making a bigger deal out of this than it should be...But it just bothers me not understanding something I'm trying to understand :p

Which one do you think looks better? is the right one too saturated? How important is it to have it in sRGB instead of CMYK in this case?


Cheers,
Nora

-->Facebook (external link)Instagram (external link)<--

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
tonylong
...winded
Avatar
54,657 posts
Gallery: 60 photos
Likes: 544
Joined Sep 2007
Location: Vancouver, WA USA
     
May 29, 2014 14:35 |  #2

I don't know about "better", there just seems to be a slight difference, I see it in the skin, but looking at either one "stand-alone", well, to me it just wouldn't matter!

That being said, I don't have a Mac and don't know about the CMYK issue. What if you convert the image to sRGB? I don't work with PNG files, though, I'm just taking stabs "in the dark"!


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
Tony Long Photos on PBase (external link)
Wildlife project pics here (external link), Biking Photog shoots here (external link), "Suburbia" project here (external link)! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics here (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
nathancarter
Cream of the Crop
5,474 posts
Gallery: 32 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 594
Joined Dec 2010
     
May 29, 2014 14:43 |  #3

It's not just "the web," it's the rendering done by the web browser. Until recently, most web browsers didn't properly interpret any color space other than sRGB - they just gave it a wild guess, which usually was quite wrong. Differences in monitor calibration are also significant, though small in comparison. It's likely that if the CMYK image looks OK in your web browser, then you're using a web browser that properly handles CMYK images.

It's impossible to know how "most" people will see the image unless you also know what web browser, operating system, and monitor "most" people are using. It's reasonable to assume that "most" people are using a web browser that will properly display an image with sRGB color space. It's NOT reasonable to assume that "most" people are using a web browser that will properly display a CMYK image. Firefox? Safari? Internet Explorer? Opera, Lynx, who knows what browser your viewers are using.

Even with an updated web browser that's capable of displaying images in color spaces other than sRGB, some web-based applications (like the Dropbox web app, and sometimes even Facebook) won't properly handle images that were created with a color space other than sRGB.


http://www.avidchick.c​om (external link) for business stuff
http://www.facebook.co​m/VictorVoyeur (external link) for fun stuff

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tim
Light Bringer
Avatar
50,978 posts
Likes: 358
Joined Nov 2004
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
     
May 29, 2014 14:44 |  #4

Your right image has an RGB monitor profile attached. I'm unsure what your question is. Don't use CMYK for the web or photo printing, it's for commercial printing only.


Professional wedding photographer, solution architect and general technical guy with multiple Amazon Web Services certifications.
Read all my FAQs (wedding, printing, lighting, books, etc)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Dmitriy
Member
Avatar
247 posts
Likes: 9
Joined Nov 2011
     
May 29, 2014 14:58 |  #5

CMYK is for printing only and the abbreviature stands for four ink colors (cyan, magenta, yellow and key (black)). Monitors display images in 3 color space, RGB. Short answer - you shouldn't save as CMYK.

Just fun fact, PNG format is for screens only and doesn't support CMYK.


My Stock Photography (external link) | My Mobile Photography (external link) | My: Google + (external link) , Facebook (external link) , Twitter (external link)
Keywording Tool (external link) for stock photographers | Photo and videography (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Dmitriy
Member
Avatar
247 posts
Likes: 9
Joined Nov 2011
     
May 29, 2014 15:12 |  #6

As was mentioned above, you still see your image in RGB, since a RGB profile is attached. For some people, your image will look like this:

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: NOT FOUND | MIME changed to 'image/png'

My Stock Photography (external link) | My Mobile Photography (external link) | My: Google + (external link) , Facebook (external link) , Twitter (external link)
Keywording Tool (external link) for stock photographers | Photo and videography (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Naraly
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Avatar
221 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Feb 2012
Location: California
     
May 29, 2014 15:41 |  #7

Ok, I don't feel very smart now. When I opened the screenshot image and clicked "save as" it showed "working CMYK" next to the color section so I assumed it meant that's how it currently was. But after reading Tim's post I clicked on "more info" on the image, indeed, it does say RGB. :oops: Thanks everyone for helping though! I did learn new stuff, I didn't know each browser & online program interpreted the color spaces differently :-o



Cheers,
Nora

-->Facebook (external link)Instagram (external link)<--

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tim
Light Bringer
Avatar
50,978 posts
Likes: 358
Joined Nov 2004
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
     
May 29, 2014 15:58 |  #8

Color can be tricky. Grab one of the books from my book thread, could help you a lot. Note the list is a bit old, check for newer versions of books before ordering anything.


Professional wedding photographer, solution architect and general technical guy with multiple Amazon Web Services certifications.
Read all my FAQs (wedding, printing, lighting, books, etc)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tonylong
...winded
Avatar
54,657 posts
Gallery: 60 photos
Likes: 544
Joined Sep 2007
Location: Vancouver, WA USA
     
May 29, 2014 22:44 |  #9

Naraly wrote in post #16938751 (external link)
Ok, I don't feel very smart now. When I opened the screenshot image and clicked "save as" it showed "working CMYK" next to the color section so I assumed it meant that's how it currently was. But after reading Tim's post I clicked on "more info" on the image, indeed, it does say RGB. :oops: Thanks everyone for helping though! I did learn new stuff, I didn't know each browser & online program interpreted the color spaces differently :-o

One thing to be aware of -- there is a difference from something saying "RGB" and the actual color space used by generic viewers and generic Web browsers (and which "color aware" browsers/viewers can easily handle), which is "sRGB". When you see "RGB" (without the "s") then it typically refers to something internal/in your system, and maybe the Mac is using that internally, but is not "meant" for the "outside world".

How much of a difference that will make in what you actually put out and see is, well, it can vary, although I don't know the various "technical" details. Maybe someone "in the know" can fill in the blanks!


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
Tony Long Photos on PBase (external link)
Wildlife project pics here (external link), Biking Photog shoots here (external link), "Suburbia" project here (external link)! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics here (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tzalman
Fatal attraction.
Avatar
13,475 posts
Likes: 196
Joined Apr 2005
Location: Gesher Haziv, Israel
     
May 30, 2014 05:54 |  #10

Any image that appears on a screen is in that monitor's color space. The space will be determined by the profile used by the OS or graphics card to configure the monitor and the monitor's physical characteristics. Therefore a screen capture will necessarily be in that monitor space (which will always be an RGB space - monitors don't do CMYK because they don't use ink.) The capture tool used by the OP very sensibly embedded the correct profile, the monitor profile. Unfortunately, an image with an embedded profile different from sRGB will require a color managed browser to be seen properly. MS's Snipping Tool embeds sRGB which is inaccurate but probably not horribly so.


Elie / אלי

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

959 views & 0 likes for this thread
CMYK for web?
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is skoczekan
1127 guests, 354 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.