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Thread started 04 Jun 2014 (Wednesday) 04:26
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70d af, could someone evaluate?

 
Jiggo0109
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Jun 04, 2014 04:26 |  #1

Hi...

Id like to post this on the 70 af issue thread but the issue is different so I decided to make a new one. The issue is (samples attached) about the sharpness of images from the farthest left to the farthest right af points. I get sharp images from the left af point and blurred from the right af point. These shots were handheld but tried them several times and I was getting the same results. Also tried this indoors with 430exII (bounced) and gives me the same issue. I was thinking that this could be the problem of the 70d in connection or relevance with the f2.8 issue. I dont know anything on the tech side of the camera so perhaps those who do can have their speculations too.

Far left af point

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IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
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Mid point
IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
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Far right af point
IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
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The target point is the dried bamboo. Preferred to shoot handheld at 15 to 18ft from the target. Notice that te sharpest one was from the left af point. All at f4, iso 640, 1/250, sharpness at 7.



  
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John ­ from ­ PA
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Jun 04, 2014 06:42 |  #2

When I look at some really tight crops of just your target, the bamboo, I do see that when you focused on the extreme left the image appears sharper. Initially I have to ask what lens were you using and do you have the opportunity to try another lens? Has the lens used ever sustained an impact or been dropped? This would give some indication if it is the body or perhaps a lens issue.




  
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Lowner
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Jun 04, 2014 07:10 |  #3

It all looks exactly as I'd expect. How is it different to what you'd have wanted?

Did the meter select different apertures through the series as you moved to different AF points? And where these shots tripod mounted to remove any doubts about camera shake?


Richard

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i-G12
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Jun 04, 2014 07:19 |  #4

No offense at all but at this point I think people are so paranoid about the original 70D focusing issue that they're looking for things that may be wrong or just flat making things up in their heads.

I've finally moved on and am trying to improve my technique i.e. exposure, subject, lighting, camera shake etc. We're always going to get some bad shots and maybe some of it is the camera (any camera) and maybe most of it is the user. I'm not saying that some 70Ds don't have the original issue but from what I've seen in the 70D photo thread there are a lot of great photos being taken throughout the range of f stops and different lenses.

I really don't see anything unusual about the shots in the OP.




  
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Jiggo0109
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Jun 04, 2014 07:30 |  #5

John from PA wrote in post #16950608 (external link)
When I look at some really tight crops of just your target, the bamboo, I do see that when you focused on the extreme left the image appears sharper. Initially I have to ask what lens were you using and do you have the opportunity to try another lens? Has the lens used ever sustained an impact or been dropped? This would give some indication if it is the body or perhaps a lens issue.

The lens used is 24 105L... Also tried this with my 70-300 non L, the same results. Edit: My lenses had never been dropped nor had any impact. :-)




  
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MakisM1
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Jun 04, 2014 07:31 |  #6

i-G12 wrote in post #16950652 (external link)
No offense at all but at this point I think people are so paranoid about the original 70D focusing issue that they're looking for things that may be wrong or just flat making things up in their heads.

I've finally moved on and am trying to improve my technique i.e. exposure, subject, lighting, camera shake etc. We're always going to get some bad shots and maybe some of it is the camera (any camera) and maybe most of it is the user. I'm not saying that some 70Ds don't have the original issue but from what I've seen in the 70D photo thread there are a lot of great photos being taken throughout the range of f stops and different lenses.

I really don't see anything unusual about the shots in the OP.

Hell, I've been through this with the 60D. It's part of the growing process, if you don't get TOO paranoid about it!:rolleyes:

You start with a new body and the resdults are somewhat less than stellar. You begin by doubting the body, the lens, the firmware. Finally you accept that all the 'physical' parameters are as expected.

Then the growing begins. You start developing your shooting technique, learning what to expect from your tools (body and lenses), how to use them to your advantage.

Then (or in parallel) you advance in the post-processing area.

It is a life-long learning, with some setbacks (new body, new lens, new ambitions changing the playing field).

To the OP: Try shooting a textured surface (like a manicured lawn) to trace the changes of sharpness along the DOF. Then we can have less confusion.:D


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Jiggo0109
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Jun 04, 2014 07:35 |  #7

Lowner wrote in post #16950634 (external link)
It all looks exactly as I'd expect. How is it different to what you'd have wanted?

Did the meter select different apertures through the series as you moved to different AF points? And where these shots tripod mounted to remove any doubts about camera shake?

Shot this in manual exposure so the settings were all constant, tripod is not tried yet. Had several series of the same target and everything is constant, sharp at left-blurred at right af point.




  
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i-G12
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Jun 04, 2014 07:40 |  #8

+1 for sure. Very well said @MakisM1.

That's pretty much where I am. Gonna shoot pictures and learn. In the end I think my camera is fine!

/paranoid

MakisM1 wrote in post #16950668 (external link)
Hell, I've been through this with the 60D. It's part of the growing process, if you don't get TOO paranoid about it!:rolleyes:

You start with a new body and the resdults are somewhat less than stellar. You begin by doubting the body, the lens, the firmware. Finally you accept that all the 'physical' parameters are as expected.

Then the growing begins. You start developing your shooting technique, learning what to expect from your tools (body and lenses), how to use them to your advantage.

Then (or in parallel) you advance in the post-processing area.

It is a life-long learning, with some setbacks (new body, new lens, new ambitions changing the playing field).

To the OP: Try shooting a textured surface (like a manicured lawn) to trace the changes of sharpness along the DOF. Then we can have less confusion.:D




  
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Jiggo0109
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Jun 04, 2014 07:48 |  #9

i-G12 wrote in post #16950652 (external link)
No offense at all but at this point I think people are so paranoid about the original 70D focusing issue that they're looking for things that may be wrong or just flat making things up in their heads.

I've finally moved on and am trying to improve my technique i.e. exposure, subject, lighting, camera shake etc. We're always going to get some bad shots and maybe some of it is the camera (any camera) and maybe most of it is the user. I'm not saying that some 70Ds don't have the original issue but from what I've seen in the 70D photo thread there are a lot of great photos being taken throughout the range of f stops and different lenses.

I really don't see anything unusual about the shots in the OP.

I had followed the af issue thread since it started and really made me paranoid too (up to this time) and am really trying my best to be convinced that my unit is okay. But when Im out there in the real world with the fastest shutter speed as possible, I still get soft images. So what I do is shoot at 5.6 to 11 to get out from getting worried of my shots.




  
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vengence
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Jun 04, 2014 07:48 |  #10

Honestly, shoot this with a tripod and then compare. Hand held just has too much variability. Andif you can, find a target that has some sense of scale in front or behind. With that picture, it's hard to tell if it's even front or back focusing.


Also, autofocus is never perfect. Here's a write up that roger at lensrental did on the subject.

http://www.lensrentals​.com …-your-lens-with-autofocus (external link)




  
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Lowner
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Jun 04, 2014 09:18 |  #11

Jiggo0109 wrote in post #16950674 (external link)
Shot this in manual exposure so the settings were all constant, tripod is not tried yet. Had several series of the same target and everything is constant, sharp at left-blurred at right af point.

I'm simply not seeing the softer focus you describe in your samples. All of them are similar to my eyes.


Richard

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jay125
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Jun 04, 2014 09:35 |  #12

MakisM1 wrote in post #16950668 (external link)
Hell, I've been through this with the 60D. It's part of the growing process, if you don't get TOO paranoid about it!:rolleyes:

You start with a new body and the resdults are somewhat less than stellar. You begin by doubting the body, the lens, the firmware. Finally you accept that all the 'physical' parameters are as expected.

Then the growing begins. You start developing your shooting technique, learning what to expect from your tools (body and lenses), how to use them to your advantage.

Then (or in parallel) you advance in the post-processing area.

It is a life-long learning, with some setbacks (new body, new lens, new ambitions changing the playing field).

To the OP: Try shooting a textured surface (like a manicured lawn) to trace the changes of sharpness along the DOF. Then we can have less confusion.:D

+1 on this. Well said MakisM1! I think if you're a month into ownership and still can't tell, then you probably have a good copy. The bad copies make themselves known very quickly.



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gnirtS
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Jun 04, 2014 11:25 |  #13

Dont forget to compare an AF point done with normal AF and with liveview as well on the same area.


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jay125
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Jun 04, 2014 11:38 |  #14

gnirtS wrote in post #16951161 (external link)
Dont forget to compare an AF point done with normal AF and with liveview as well on the same area.

While this is important, every body I've owned has always been slightly cleaner in LV vs OVF. Someone explained it is two different focusing systems, so you might expect some slight variations. My 70D is pretty close on this, but the LV is a little sharper, but then so is the LV vs OVF on my 60D. Both are extremely usable.



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apersson850
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Jun 04, 2014 15:35 as a reply to  @ jay125's post |  #15

It doesn't have to be the camera's AF that's at fault. Such a small difference may very well be due to the lens not being perfectly symmetric. Thus at the same distance setting, you get different sharpness across the frame.
Does the focusing ring run to the same setting in all three cases?


Anders

  
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