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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 15 Aug 2014 (Friday) 15:40
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Adorama Rovelight RL 600, thoughts?

 
mmmfotografie
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Oct 07, 2015 10:18 as a reply to  @ post 17736372 |  #931

See posting two of this thread about the trigger and pre-sync.




  
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OceanRipple*
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Post edited over 4 years ago by OceanRipple*. (4 edits in all)
     
Oct 07, 2015 10:38 as a reply to  @ post 17736372 |  #932

Hi Phil, That is correct.

For Supersync, you need either the Yn 622s, Phottix Odin TCU or the Mini/Flex PWs or something equivalent. Jinbei's own trigger does not do this - but it does change power in 1/3rd stop increments (& it does offer standard X-sync triggering).

This thread started pretty early; we now know that Rovelight/JinbeiHD600s have a 'normal' mode and an 'H' mode. The former offers increasingly short flash durations as you reduce power. The 'H' mode only goes down to 1/16th power - but for the settings available, they all have a long burn time of c 7.8 ms - easily long enough for all current FP shutters at their max sync or 'faster' - ie. it allows Supersync. But you still need the early signal, and that has to be from Yn, Phottix etc as above.




  
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Post edited over 4 years ago by golfecho.
     
Oct 07, 2015 10:49 |  #933

OceanRipple* wrote in post #17736409 (external link)
. . . long enough for all current FP shutters at their max . . .

Is that supposed to be FF shutters? Or is it "Focal Plane"?


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OceanRipple*
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Post edited over 4 years ago by OceanRipple*. (4 edits in all)
     
Oct 07, 2015 11:35 as a reply to  @ golfecho's post |  #934

Hi, Focal plane. This setup works nicely with a 5D III for instance.

With Supersync there is inevitably a gradient to the flash contribution to the exposure. With a 5D III, landscape, it's slightly darker at the top of the captured image. However you can ameliorate this slightly: with landscape shots, more often than not, your Rovelight/Jinbei HD600 is likely to be above the subjects eye-line anyway. But for portrait orientation it's worth having the shutter button facing towards your flash Keylight. So, for portrait orientation, if the Key is camera left, have your shutter button 'up' - and for Key camera right, switch to shutter button 'down'. (Edit: If your camera's shutter travel is reversed compared to a 5D III, then this advice should also be reversed.)

Anybody agree? Preliminary testing seems to bear this out . .

Edit: I've re-checked this and I'm more confident that the evidence supports this practice, especially for portrait orientation shots.
Edit 2: Photo added. For all 3 photos the Jinbei with white refl umbrella was to the viewer's left. The left portrait shot was following the rule (shutter button up). The central shot just confirms darker to the top - the light was not high, it was just camera left. The right hand shot was breaking the rule (shutter button down or facing away from the key source). Clearly following the rule helps.


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PECE ­ Photo
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Oct 07, 2015 16:11 as a reply to  @ OceanRipple*'s post |  #935

I found the gradients to be in the unacceptable range. Everyone has their tolerances though. This frame is a wall flashed directly behind me using supersync, or whatever it is called. The light should essentially be very close to even, so what you are seeing is the effects of the long burn, as the images above show as well.


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Oct 07, 2015 16:38 |  #936

Are you sure that is due to the high speed sync mode? Thought most dslrs used a top-down shutter motion, and from what I've seen from output graphs I would have expected the top to be brighter and then fade more to the bottom. (Output curve was fairly even, but trailed down at the long end of the flash duration.)

Gradients on a wall can be tricky things due to room geometry, reflection, and light projection from the source. At the very least when doing tests like this you should do them in both portrait and landscape to make sure the gradient is changing direction. If the gradient remains the same then you don't have an output issue, but a projection issue.


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Oct 07, 2015 17:42 |  #937

Hi, The shutter movement is from top down but the image is captured up-side down - so the upper part of the image, as normally viewed, gets the weaker tail as the light output decays.

The gradient is an issue but the left hand part of my trio would be acceptable to many in a portrait. But the ND route is a great option as long as the shutter at max sync is satisfactory for the circumstances - it's nice to have both options!




  
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Post edited over 4 years ago by PECE Photo. (2 edits in all)
     
Oct 07, 2015 20:11 as a reply to  @ Luckless's post |  #938

I am sure because I turned the camera upside down and took a frame to be sure. Your response indicates how unacceptable it is, and I agree with you.


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Oct 08, 2015 07:05 |  #939

Here's a practical question. Is the degree of falloff or gradient more pronounced at higher shutter speeds, or lower at higher speeds?

My guess is the degree of gradient would be more pronounced at the lower shutter speeds when using the Super Synch because the shutter is open longer. (Obviously if shooting at or below max shutter synch and in normal mode is not the problem, only when slightly above max shutter synch speed and using the super synch, or "H" setting). For very fast shutter speeds (like 1/4000, or 1/8000 for example) I would guess the falloff would be less pronounced because the shutter is open for a shorter period.

Do I have this assumption correct? I just want to make sure I'm not missing something obvious.


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Oct 08, 2015 10:21 as a reply to  @ golfecho's post |  #940

I was curious about that too. But at some point I lost curiosity as for me the gradient was just too much at all shutter speeds. I did not notice a pattern though, I'm sure there is one though.


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Post edited over 4 years ago by OceanRipple*. (3 edits in all)
     
Oct 12, 2015 10:10 as a reply to  @ golfecho's post |  #941

Hi, (sorry, I've been off the grid) Above the normal max sync speed for FP shutters, it becomes the travel time for the shutter slot that influences the gradient, rather than the 'shutter speed'.

Even while the slot gets narrower, as the 'shutter speed' increases, the slot travel time remains (very nearly) constant. So, AFAIK, the gradient is not influenced by the 'shutter speed' above max sync. That seems to be consistent with my findings. Cheers




  
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Oct 14, 2015 12:02 |  #942

If you received a defective remote, you need to complete the details here: http://www.adorama.com​/pages/rovelight-replacement (external link).

If we can make a start now, then by the time we get them in towards the end of the month, we'll be able to start shipping out as promptly as possible.



  
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Post edited over 4 years ago by Harth.
     
Oct 15, 2015 11:27 |  #943

I have a new question with the battery charging indicator:

I've read the manual a few times but I still don't know what the lights mean on the battery charger.
What does the green and what does the red lights mean?


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Oct 15, 2015 11:44 |  #944

Harth wrote in post #17746558 (external link)
I have a new question with the battery charging indicator:

I've read the manual a few times but I still don't know what the lights mean on the battery charger.
What does the green and what does the red lights mean?

Green charged, red charging. At least that's what's worked for me!


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Oct 15, 2015 11:51 as a reply to  @ flowrider's post |  #945

Crap, I thought red was charged for some reason. Now that makes sense...

I just got mine and when I plugged it in it was initially green then would switch to red soon after. Guess I should leave it on longer.

Thanks Steve!


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Adorama Rovelight RL 600, thoughts?
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