Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Sports Talk 
Thread started 20 Aug 2014 (Wednesday) 15:11
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Shooting College Football

 
SierraHighPhoto
Senior Member
Avatar
447 posts
Likes: 21
Joined Mar 2008
Location: California
     
Aug 20, 2014 15:11 |  #1

I've been given the opportunity to shoot a few games this season and was hoping for some input on how I might get around some obstacles.

Right now I'm shooting with a 5D3, 300mm F/4L IS and a 200mm F/4L. From what I understand both of these should get me decent shots, assuming it's day time, but night games could be an issue.

Currently I'm not sure what games I'm going to get, but assuming I do get a night game, I don't want to decline because of equipment and lose my chance for any other games.

The other issue is I can't afford to rent a 300 or 400mm F/2.8. I could do the 70-200mm however.

Am I going to be okay bumping up the ISO for the game? Will they come out too dark/blurry?

Any input on how to get the best photos possible at night with the 300 at least (as said I can afford to rent a 200mm F/2.8 IS).

Thanks



  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
xchangx
Senior Member
507 posts
Joined May 2007
Location: Mobile, AL
     
Aug 20, 2014 16:12 |  #2

Couple of questions:

1) Have you shot football before? If not go shoot a few highschool games to get the hang of it.
2) What colleges? Depending on the stadium, you'll either have good results with a f4 lens or bad.
3) I assume you understand exposure. If not learn it before you go out. Yes, bumping the ISO is ok. You'll need to shooting at f4. Keep the shutter speed above 1/640 (minimum).


Nikon D4s / 2x D3s / D3 / 17-35 2.8 / 70-200 2.8 / 600 f4
Freelance sports photographer for Getty Images Sports, Entertainment and News
Freelance sports photographer for Sports Illustrated
My Images with Getty (external link)
My Sportsshooter Page (external link)
My Website (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sspellman
Goldmember
Avatar
1,731 posts
Likes: 28
Joined Dec 2006
Location: Detroit, Michigan
     
Aug 20, 2014 16:31 |  #3

Its impossible for us to guess the amount of light at a night game. Of course, you will have less grainy photos if you are using 2.8 lenses and more in focus shots if you were using better sports cameras such as the 70D or 1D4. With the 300m lens on a full frame, it will be tough for you to get good clear shots at distances more than 30 yards. If your assignment is to capture every peak play and moment of the game for magazine publication, you will certainly want different gear. If your assignment is to capture a few good photographs for your portfolio, you can work with what you have. You should be able to bump your ISO to 3200 for decent photos to keep your shutter speed at 1/320th plus. You can practice your shooting and focusing technique on cars before the game.

Many high school night football game photographers use flash, but it all depends on the ambient light and rules.

Check out these tips:
https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=735799

http://www.sportsshoot​er.com …oting_football/​index.html (external link)


ScottSpellmanMedia.com [photography]

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SierraHighPhoto
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
447 posts
Likes: 21
Joined Mar 2008
Location: California
     
Aug 21, 2014 12:01 |  #4

This is just for my portfolio and nothing more, so no need for the ESPN shots, granted that would be nice. It'll be at Fresno State, so I would think the lighting would be better than say a D3 school.

Definitely am trying to head over to one of the local high schools to practice. Any word on how you go about that? Who you contact?



  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ChunkyDA
Goldmember
Avatar
3,706 posts
Gallery: 17 photos
Likes: 88
Joined Apr 2007
Location: Emerald Coast, FL
     
Aug 26, 2014 20:23 |  #5

With my 5D3 I shoot HS football around ISO 10,000 and use HSS mode on my 580EXii. As I read this, you are just practicing so I can't see renting anything unless you want to burn money. The lighting at a D1 college will be much better than a HS stadium unless it is a monster of a HS.
The HS stadiums around here are EV 5-6 and no light enters from the end zones, not got for action shots.


Dave
Support Search and Rescue, Get Lost (external link)
Gear list and some feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
DC ­ Fan
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,881 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 50
Joined Oct 2005
     
Sep 02, 2014 05:01 |  #6

SierraHighPhoto wrote in post #17107929 (external link)
I've been given the opportunity to shoot a few games this season and was hoping for some input on how I might get around some obstacles.

Right now I'm shooting with a 5D3, 300mm F/4L IS and a 200mm F/4L. From what I understand both of these should get me decent shots, assuming it's day time, but night games could be an issue.

Currently I'm not sure what games I'm going to get, but assuming I do get a night game, I don't want to decline because of equipment and lose my chance for any other games.

The other issue is I can't afford to rent a 300 or 400mm F/2.8. I could do the 70-200mm however.

Am I going to be okay bumping up the ISO for the game? Will they come out too dark/blurry?

Any input on how to get the best photos possible at night with the 300 at least (as said I can afford to rent a 200mm F/2.8 IS).

Thanks

The challenges of photographing American gridiron football are less about equipment setup than about getting the most compelling action in frame. You'll spend your first few games getting used to making sure you properly track the action and push the shutter button at the right time. No camera settings can help you learn how to follow the best action. Following the ball on a long pass play is something you can expect to get wrong at first.

If you're accustomed to slow, static, controlled work, football sidelines will come as a busy, frequently crowded shock. You'll need to quickly get used to situations where the game controls you, where you need to often move from place to place, where your access can be limited and where people get in your way and you can't do anything about it. One moment you can be in a good location to capture action heading toward you, and then the next moment the ball changes possession and you'll need to move halfway down the field - over and over.

You'll also face some very real physical risks. It's common for sideline football photographers to be knocked down, injured and have their equipment damaged. You'll need to rapidly develop a sense of self-preservation to minimize the chance of this happening.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
skilsaw
Senior Member
302 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Aug 2013
     
Sep 30, 2014 01:27 |  #7

DC Fan wrote in post #17130972 (external link)
You'll also face some very real physical risks. It's common for sideline football photographers to be knocked down, injured and have their equipment damaged. You'll need to rapidly develop a sense of self-preservation to minimize the chance of this happening.

I have just started photographing first division men's rugby. I'm able to stand 5 yards back from the sideline to give me a margin of safety. I'd hate to get clobbered by someone running full tilt up the sideline. And a player would be really ticked if he had to run around me because I encroached on the field.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Hannya
Goldmember
Avatar
1,062 posts
Likes: 65
Joined Apr 2008
Location: UK
     
Sep 30, 2014 04:35 |  #8

Get some good PL insurance, you'll probably need it to shoot pitchside anyway. Your own safety is paramount. Watch the game, not just through the lens. Be aware of what's coming your way and move. Best shots are from low down, kneeling maybe. That makes moving swiftly harder. Practice.


“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.” ― Henri Cartier-Bresson

Sports Pics (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

1,827 views & 0 likes for this thread
Shooting College Football
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Sports Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is svakomnet
706 guests, 242 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.