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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 25 Sep 2014 (Thursday) 17:02
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Very First Impressions of the 6D

 
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Oct 02, 2014 10:04 |  #31

stevewf1 wrote in post #17189440 (external link)
You don't have to shoot RAW right now. It isn't like JPEGs are all going to be a worthless waste of time. If a JPEG comes out looking pretty darn good, I'm not sure there's a whole lot more where RAW will help - or if it would be worth the effort.

Actually, to start, I'd just shoot JPEG until you get the hang of using the camera and look at your shots using something like Irfanview. You'll be more able to quickly see where you're going wrong, or right. You're not going to be able to truly judge your photos by looking at them on the LCD screen.

I'm sorry but I disagree - strongly. If you just want the camera's automated result, this may be good advice.

But remember Ansel Adams' analogy of the negative being the merely the written composition and the print the performance. Put in a digital context, that means the image file is just the beginning of a realized image.

OP, JPEG is just not as flexible as RAW and having a bunch of early JPEGs that you regret making because your skills are growing but the JPEG won't let you reach your personal vision for an image is not a good position to find yourself in. Shoot RAW. If you don't want to process RAWs right now, shoot RAW+JPEG and save the RAWs for when you have a better idea what you want to do. But don't handicap yourself with a buch of JPEGs that you will later regret.


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Oct 02, 2014 16:39 |  #32

^ Sold advice.

After about a year of shooting only raw, I wish I had my older photos as raw for processing.
There are some that could be corrected and fixed better if they were raw.

If you have space on the SD card, and your external disk, shoot both. You will be thankfully later.


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Oct 03, 2014 03:07 |  #33

Hold on, I'm not advocating JPEG over RAW, not at all. Just saying that the OP might shoot JPEG for awhile until he gets comfortable with the camera and how it exposes in different scenes. He'll get quick full-screen images to see how he and the camera are doing. Then he can get into all the processing with RAW... Just a suggestion.


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Oct 03, 2014 03:59 as a reply to  @ stevewf1's post |  #34

Or maybe just shoot RAW, and export them in DPP using a jpg present. You get the best of both worlds; a RAW image to edit later (if needed)and a .jpg that you can use now with no adjustments.


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Oct 03, 2014 06:06 |  #35

Gregg.Siam wrote in post #17191264 (external link)
Or maybe just shoot RAW, and export them in DPP using a jpg present. You get the best of both worlds; a RAW image to edit later (if needed)and a .jpg that you can use now with no adjustments.

problem is, pure RAW image just converted to jpeg looks worse than jpeg edited in camera.


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Oct 03, 2014 06:11 |  #36

palad1n wrote in post #17191346 (external link)
problem is, pure RAW image just converted to jpeg looks worse than jpeg edited in camera.

i shoot small jpg and edited in the same camera and some times with a tiny touch with DPP on the computer
I hate big RAW files , i know it's better for editting but I'm so lazy , i like the easy way and fast work


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Oct 03, 2014 06:29 |  #37

Congrats ! For the new camera


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Oct 03, 2014 06:48 |  #38

palad1n wrote in post #17191346 (external link)
problem is, pure RAW image just converted to jpeg looks worse than jpeg edited in camera.

Using DPP, they should be identical...


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Oct 03, 2014 07:20 |  #39

TeamSpeed wrote in post #17191374 (external link)
Using DPP, they should be identical...

i never used dPP, so i can´tell, but ACR keeps RAW untouched except it remaps automatically stuck/hot/dead pixels and removes color noise.


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Oct 03, 2014 07:26 |  #40

palad1n wrote in post #17191408 (external link)
i never used dPP, so i can´tell, but ACR keeps RAW untouched except it remaps automatically stuck/hot/dead pixels and removes color noise.

So does DPP... no raw converter changes the raw data. DPP just honors your in-camera settings so that it can produce the same JPG as the camera would. Spend your time getting the shot right in camera, and DPP rewards you. The other raw converters don't, they make you start from the same baseline, photo by photo, requiring you to do all that work over again.


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Oct 03, 2014 07:40 |  #41

Hi congrats on the new camera. One thing no one touched is, if you don't have you monitor calibrated chances of getting a good print from your printer or any other print place is pretty slim.
Most of us have our screens set up way too bright and what you see on the screen is not what you are going to see on paper. :)


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Oct 03, 2014 07:46 |  #42

awesomeshots wrote in post #17191427 (external link)
Hi congrats on the new camera. One thing no one touched is, if you don't have you monitor calibrated chances of getting a good print from your printer or any other print place is pretty slim.
Most of us have our screens set up way too bright and what you see on the screen is not what you are going to see on paper. :)

Very good point, I never believed that until I calibrated my home equipment (monitors and printer). What the manufacturers sell you isn't what the photos will look like.


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Oct 03, 2014 07:48 |  #43

Awesome, you are a genius. I agree with you 100%. My images have turned out much better on screen and especially printed since getting a calibrator for my monitor. Now I actually get what I see on screen when I get the printed. Prior to my Color Munki, all of my shot were way to dark when printed.
I calibrate about every other week, and even before some jobs to make sure I am getting what I need on them.
So right now, while OP is learning, not that big of a deal. But when you get the chance to, and the money, make sure you look at getting some sort of calibrating option. Even the less than $100 Color Munki was a HUGE difference in the finished products for me.


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Oct 03, 2014 07:48 |  #44

I love my 6D. It's the best "photo buy" I've made in a very long time...


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Oct 03, 2014 08:37 |  #45

A year ago I was in a similar position, having only had digital P&S cameras, preceded by a Nikon SLR. Welcome to the digital SLR, it's a whole new world. My path was less sure than yours, starting with a T3, then quickly outgrowing it for a 70D. You made a great choice starting with the 6D.

Beware Ken Rockwell's advice. I took it when starting out because I didn't know any better, but he really likes to go to extremes. He puts sharpening quite high (IIRC he recommends +6, I stop at +5) and WAY over-saturates his stuff (think 3+ saturation, when even +2 can be too much in-camera, especially if you don't enjoy orange people). It wasn't bad to start when I knew no better, and those settings make your photos 'pop', but you will probably quickly realize they are overdoing it.

Re: RAW vs. JPEG - I shoot RAW+JPEG all the time. I keep most of the JPEGs, mostly of family photos and those ok to keep but not good enough to be worth spending time on. I edit and keep RAWs that I consider 'keeper' photos, then delete the rest. This path also gives me good reason to get it as right in-camera as I possibly can, that way even the non-'keeper' JPEGs are good photos. Since I don't ever plan on editing every photo this is the best compromise for me, FWIW.

It was mentioned before, but don't forget you can change the adjustment wheels to fit your style. I usually shoot Av (Aperture Priority), so I'm very much used to having aperture under my index finger. When you go to Manual, it puts shutter at your finger & aperture at your thumb. You can switch those in the controls menu. If I shot Tv more, I'd want to leave it default. Just something to consider if you find yourself shooting Av a lot; it makes the switch to manual easier because of your muscle memory (Aperture = finger).


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Very First Impressions of the 6D
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