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Thread started 06 Nov 2014 (Thursday) 20:28
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Subject isolation with the 10-22 lens.

 
Perfectly ­ Frank
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Nov 06, 2014 20:28 |  #1

I came across this photo while surfing flickr. I like the subject isolation and the way the car pops.

https://www.flickr.com …avetoussaint/14​839207228/ (external link)

From my understanding of zooms, a shallow dof results when the lens is set to a wide aperture (say f2.8) and a long focal length. But this photographer used his 10-22 lens at f10 and 10mm. And yet the shallow dof is very attractive.

So, is shallow dof a characteristic of the 10-22? I enjoy car show photography, perhaps I should put this lens on my Christmas list? :)


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Nogo
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Nov 06, 2014 20:32 |  #2

The effect of a shallow DOF is because the photographer is quite close to the front fender/headlight. The wide angle lens makes the photograph appear to have been taken further back than it actually was.


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DreDaze
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Nov 06, 2014 20:58 |  #3

or it's just photoshop...look at the trash box thru the window...it looks to be in focus more than the rest of the background....also the antennae is blurred halfway up...

you're going to have a hard time getting that kind of isolation with a 10-22mm...the best you'd be able to get would be a 16-35 f2.8 on a FF camera...and even then it's not going to pop like that image, because in that image it's just the car that's in focus...things that are the same distance from the camera as the backend are blurred to all hell


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Nov 06, 2014 21:08 as a reply to  @ DreDaze's post |  #4

It because of post processing, not because of DOF. Some sort of blur filter or similar.


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Nov 06, 2014 21:09 |  #5

Nogo wrote in post #17256753 (external link)
The effect of a shallow DOF is because the photographer is quite close to the front fender/headlight. The wide angle lens makes the photograph appear to have been taken further back than it actually was.

DreDaze wrote in post #17256792 (external link)
or it's just photoshop...look at the trash box thru the window...it looks to be in focus more than the rest of the background....also the antennae is blurred halfway up...

you're going to have a hard time getting that kind of isolation with a 10-22mm...the best you'd be able to get would be a 16-35 f2.8 on a FF camera...and even then it's not going to pop like that image, because in that image it's just the car that's in focus...things that are the same distance from the camera as the backend are blurred to all hell

I'd vote its a combination of these 2 things. Shooting a subject up close with a wide angle will give you some isolation, but at first glance the blur appears to be added in post.




  
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Nov 06, 2014 21:11 as a reply to  @ DreDaze's post |  #6

Yeah, that blur has been done in photoshop. The distance view through the windscreen is sharper than the rest of the scene at the same distance, because the author didn't blur over that part.




  
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Nov 06, 2014 21:26 |  #7

You can see the photographer's shadow. He isn't that close. There would be more distortion if he were. Not bad PP though.




  
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crbinson
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Nov 06, 2014 21:35 |  #8

Considering the EXIF indicates f/10 as the aperture setting and the photo is tagged with Topaz Labs...


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Mike ­ Deep
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Nov 06, 2014 21:38 |  #9

Perfectly Frank wrote in post #17256747 (external link)
From my understanding of zooms, a shallow dof results when the lens is set to a wide aperture (say f2.8) and a long focal length. But this photographer used his 10-22 lens at f10 and 10mm. And yet the shallow dof is very attractive.

It's Photoshop, and it's obvious. They masked off the car and blurred the background, but didn't do the areas behind the windscreen and totally missed the antenna.


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jmai86
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Nov 06, 2014 21:45 |  #10

Just awful photoshopping.

You'd need a 24 1.4 or faster to get this sort of blur while also being wide. Even then, you'd need to stand fairly close to the car.




  
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Nov 06, 2014 21:54 |  #11

Nethawked wrote in post #17256827 (external link)
Not bad PP though.

It's actually not very good at all.


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Perfectly ­ Frank
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Nov 06, 2014 22:01 as a reply to  @ carpenter's post |  #12

Thanks folks, for the comments.

I didn't think the pp was bad, as some said. Perhaps that's because I'm a casual photographer and don't have a critical eye.


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Nov 06, 2014 22:08 |  #13

Had to double-take on the word "windscreen". Never heard of it before. Windshield around these parts.




  
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Perfectly ­ Frank
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Nov 07, 2014 00:05 |  #14

snerd wrote in post #17256896 (external link)
Had to double-take on the word "windscreen". Never heard of it before. Windshield around these parts.

It's often called a windscreen in England. A car's hood is called a bonnet.


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Nov 07, 2014 00:38 |  #15

Heya,

In this case, it's just post processing.

But the overall look of this image is very similar to the effect of medium format and large format, or in 35mm format, if you did a brenizer method panorama, it would look similar to this using that technique (to mimic medium format).

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Subject isolation with the 10-22 lens.
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