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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 31 Dec 2014 (Wednesday) 22:26
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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?

 
jessiekins
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Dec 31, 2014 22:26 |  #1

I study graphic design and I am experienced with editing and the use of Photoshop.
However, I am now dipping my toes into DSLRs and purchased the Canon EOS Rebel T5.

My questions---
1: Is this camera a good camera to use for professional photography, with the use of 1-3 lens?
2: What lens do you recommend for portrait photography compatible with this camera?
3: Is this camera only good for beginners? What camera do you recommend for professional photography in the long run?

Thank you.


Jessica Rose

  
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Dec 31, 2014 22:36 |  #2

i started out with a 700D (which i think is the european version) and used it from motorsports to street shooting. My favorite lenses would have to be 24-70 f2.8 and 50 f1.8.


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Dec 31, 2014 22:36 |  #3

Jessie: The T5 is an excellent camera, that in the right hands, can produce incredible images. At some point though, you may want to upgrade to a full frame version, such as the 5D Mark III. There is no reason why you would need to do so for perhaps a couple of years, at least.

Lens wise, an 85mm prime is excellent for portraits and produces nice bokeh. It is always good to have a 50mm prime "nifty fifty" as well. Beyond these two, your needs will depend on the type of work you will be doing....hope this helps some.


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jessiekins
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Dec 31, 2014 22:43 as a reply to  @ russ71satellite's post |  #4

Thank you. How do I know if my camera is compatible with the lens? And, what exactly does 85mm prime mean? My lens that I have now is the 18-55mm IS II Lens. How am I supposed to know the depth of this camera if it doesn't give me a focal range? Does this make sense, haha thank you for your help.


Jessica Rose

  
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Post edited over 5 years ago by LevelPebble. (3 edits in all)
     
Dec 31, 2014 22:54 as a reply to  @ jessiekins's post |  #5

The 18-55 lens is a zoom that can operate at A 18 mm focal length at the wide end (when you want the subject to be less magnified) and at 55 mm at the other end ( subject is more magnified) plus anything in between. The actual numbers (18, 55, 85) are somewhat arbitrary, but the larger the number means more magnification (you could take a picture of something further away)

When people refer to full frame, they are referring to the size of the sensor in the camera. The T5i ( and many other Canon cameras) use a smaller crop sensor. Full frame lenses can be used on a crop camera, but crop lenses cant be used on a full frame.

A prime lens, like the 85 mm has a fixed focal length. Prime lens usually have better optics, but are not as versatile as a zoom. If your subject is too close or too far away with a prime, all you can do is move closer or father away with your feet.

You can take excellent pictures with the T5i and 18-55 lens you have now until you get more knowledge and decide to upgrade. It really depends on what types of pictures you want to be shooting. Good lenses are way more important than a better camera body.

I have been using a T1i, the 18-55 lens, and a 70-200 zoom for motorsports and get great shots.


Motorsports Photographer for ARCA at Flat Rock/Toledo Speedway

  
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LevelPebble
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Dec 31, 2014 23:16 |  #6

As far as lens compatibility, lenses are manufactured of course, by Canon, and also third party lenses from companies like Sigma or Tamron among others.

The third party lenses are all made in versions to fit different brands of cameras. You would need to order one of those with a Canon mount which is different than a Nikon mount for example. Some people prefer to only use lenses manufactured by Canon, but depending on the specific lens; the third party lenses are either cheaper, fit a niche that Canon doesn't make one for, or at times may provide better performance.

1) If buying a Canon lens, just need to know if it is for crop bodies or full frame.

2) In addition, if buying a third party lens need to specify Canon mount.

There are lens rental companies that rent lenses, so you can try them out for a week or more too determine if that is what you really want.

The camera and lens you have is more than capable of taking great pictures, but people that specialize in portraits would prefer to use some more specialized lenses as they improve their skills. A better camera doesn't necessarily make a better photographer. It is a lot like cooking. I can buy a great set of pots and pans, but that won't make me a good chef.


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LevelPebble
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Dec 31, 2014 23:36 |  #7

Are you planning on shooting outdoors, indoors, or both?

If indoors, I would recommend getting a dedicated seperate flash like a Speedlite. The built in flash on the camera is pretty marginal at best.


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jessiekins
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Jan 01, 2015 00:27 |  #8

LevelPebble wrote in post #17359983 (external link)
Are you planning on shooting outdoors, indoors, or both?

If indoors, I would recommend getting a dedicated seperate flash like a Speedlite. The built in flash on the camera is pretty marginal at best.

LevelPebble: Thank you so much for your in-depth response. It really, really helped me :-) I plan on primarily shooting portrait, children, and family photography. I can show you an example of my work using my 18-55mm lens. I just feel like it could be sharper. Perhaps I simply need to adjust my manual settings.

I shoot indoors and outdoors. I love natural light. And, I will definitely purchase a speedlight. I am planning on building an in-home studio for my photography! Just need to learn more about lighting! I will check out your work. Sounds pretty amazing!


Jessica Rose

  
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Jan 01, 2015 06:11 |  #9

I've done portrait work using a 500d (T1i) and a 600D (T3i) and a Canon 18-200 f3.5-5.6 and gotten very good results. An example below...

As Russ mentioned above the T5i is a great camera.....in the right hands. So at this point what I would suggest to you is to practice and experiment and find out what happens when you use certain settings on your camera and when you shoot under certain light conditions. Lighting is more important than you can imagine and will make or break any picture.

Most importantly, learn your camera. Know everything about it to the point where you can operate it without even looking at it.

Good luck to you and have fun.


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Jan 01, 2015 10:40 |  #10

Jessica,

One of the lenses that a lot of people here seem to like for portraits is the Canon EF 50 mm f1.8 (nicknamed the "Nifty Fifty") Very reasonably priced at around $125.This is a prime lens and highly thought of here considering the low price.

The number after the "f" (like f1.8) indicates the lens aperture. A smaller number indicates that the lens can let in more light than one with a larger "f" number. A lens with a larger aperture allows you a lot more flexibility with other settings and also usually provide better "bokeh"

Bokeh is a Japanese word that describes the background being out of focus when the subject is in focus. Very important for portraits as you don't want the background to take any attention away from the subject. However for something like landscapes you would probably not want bokeh effects, so you would use different settings than you would for portraits.

In general, lens with lower "f" numbers are more $$$, but the Nifty Fifty, while it performs very well, isn't made very robustly to keep the cost down. FYI, I have never used one as it doesn't meet my needs for motorsports pictures.


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Post edited over 5 years ago by linnjo.
     
Jan 01, 2015 10:58 |  #11

It's not the exact same camera, but it's one of the starter cameras:

I had the Canon EOS 550D and a 18-55mm lens for the longest time, and I think it produced some good images, and it's definitely good enough when you're getting started. After a while I got the 50mm 1.4 to get more DOF and better portraits. And after who knows how long I felt like I had outgrown my 550D, because I felt like it was limiting my options, so I moved on to a 5D mk II.

If you don't mind me sharing, these were taken with the 550D and 18-55mm. Not exactly portraits, but an example of something your gear could produce:

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Jan 01, 2015 11:50 |  #12

Remember that with your T5 you will have a 1.6 crop factor to contend with. A 100mm will give you a 160mm perspective...a 50mm will give you an 80mm.......a 200mm will give you a 320mm....etc.,. Crop cameras are favored for enhancing the reach of zooms and for magnification of macros but can be excellent for portraits, etc., too. The problem with crop cameras is that wide angle lenses suffer from also being lengthened....a 20mm becomes 32mm....a 28mm becomes a 45mm...etc., so you lose the really "wide angle" view of some lenses.

The Canon 85mm f1.8 non-L is a very good, sharp and affordable lens that is often recommended for portrait work. You can pick them up refurbished on Canon's website for prices that gravitate around $300 (depending on current sales). I just looked at it looks like that model is currently out of stock. The refurbed lenses from Canon are great deals, though you might have to check all along before you find the lens that you're looking for in stock...they come with a 1-year warranty just like new lenses do. Canon refurb lens link (external link). But, the 85mm on a crop camera results in a field of view equivalent to a 135mm.

When buying Canon lenses, they build them with two different mounts. EF-S lenses are designed for (and work properly) on crop cameras but not full-frame cameras. EF lenses, on the other hand, will work fine on either crop or full-frame cameras. One of the finest crop-camera lenses is the EF-S 17-55 f2.8....very sharp and fast. I keep one on my T2i (550D) all the time. I recently purchased a 6D and I'm using a Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 on it...it's a pretty good lens and seems to do a decent job but I'm looking for something else for that camera...maybe something longer. The image quality of the EF-S 17-55 f2.8 makes it the only crop-lens that I own. Other lenses (I don't own a lot of them) are all EF lenses so they can work on either camera.

Look at the pictures that you have taken and note the focal length that they were shot at...this might point to the fact that a nice, sharp prime might be worth considering. The EF 50mm f1.8 is highly affordable and is a nice, low-light lens....and using the crop-factor of your camera puts you into the 80mm range. :)

Naturally, moving into the "L" glass class of lenses brings enhanced (most of the time) image quality and build quality...but at much enhanced pricing, too.

Use the camera you have for now, it is quiet capable...as you shoot and start settling into *your* way of seeing and shooting you will start gravitating to the lenses that will work for you style.

Best wishes,
Ed


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Jan 01, 2015 20:00 |  #13

Just shoot as much as you can with that camera. It's definitely capable of doing the photos you want, and you'll learn a lot from it. I think you'll find that the limitations associated with an entry-level camera are often not identified and appreciated until you've had a good deal of practice, so there's no reason to rush to the next step. One example is that manual operation of a Rebel is more cumbersome than with other models, but if you're not shooting in manual mode, then it isn't a limitation for the time being.

The sooner you begin to learn to shoot with flash, the better. Many photographers shy away from it, but it will improve your portrait work. In fact, I recommend that you get a speedlite before seeking out other lenses, and visit the flash and studio lighting forum here for tons of great tips. Canon speedlites are expensive, but there are more affordable options. Many here like the YongNuo offerings. The lens suggestions in this thread are good, but without knowing what size your home studio will be I can't really recommend a suitable focal length (e.g., in a confined space, an 85mm lens may be too long). Your 18-55mm will be a good start for now.


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Jan 01, 2015 20:27 |  #14

jessiekins wrote in post #17359923 (external link)
I study graphic design and I am experienced with editing and the use of Photoshop.
However, I am now dipping my toes into DSLRs and purchased the Canon EOS Rebel T5.

My questions---
1: Is this camera a good camera to use for professional photography, with the use of 1-3 lens?
2: What lens do you recommend for portrait photography compatible with this camera?
3: Is this camera only good for beginners? What camera do you recommend for professional photography in the long run?

Thank you.

Over the years I've sold images generated from a Fuji S7000, Olympus C2100, Canon D30, Digital Rebel 300D, Digital Rebel XTi, Digital Rebel T2i, Canon 60D and most recently a Digital Rebel T1i. Just today, I heard a kind, unsolicited complement for a published basketball picture generated with the T1i and a 25-year-old Canon push-pull 70-210mm f/4 lens that I purchased used for US $70. The image from the Fuji S7000 ran "full bleed" (printing jargon for border to border on a page) in a graphics-obsessed publication with no complaints. None of the publications to which I've sent images ever complained about the equipment in use.

The key to being a successful "professional" photographer is in supplying a client the images wanted by the client and meeting their deadlines. Another key is in not spending too money on equipment




  
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Jan 01, 2015 22:51 |  #15

LevelPebble wrote in post #17360437 (external link)
Jessica,

One of the lenses that a lot of people here seem to like for portraits is the Canon EF 50 mm f1.8 (nicknamed the "Nifty Fifty") Very reasonably priced at around $125.This is a prime lens and highly thought of here considering the low price.

The number after the "f" (like f1.8) indicates the lens aperture. A smaller number indicates that the lens can let in more light than one with a larger "f" number. A lens with a larger aperture allows you a lot more flexibility with other settings and also usually provide better "bokeh"

Bokeh is a Japanese word that describes the background being out of focus when the subject is in focus. Very important for portraits as you don't want the background to take any attention away from the subject. However for something like landscapes you would probably not want bokeh effects, so you would use different settings than you would for portraits.

In general, lens with lower "f" numbers are more $$$, but the Nifty Fifty, while it performs very well, isn't made very robustly to keep the cost down. FYI, I have never used one as it doesn't meet my needs for motorsports pictures.


LevelPebble: What is a prime lens? What is the difference between that and my 18-55mm lens? I will look into it. My friend offered me her 55-250mm lens should I take that or look into the prime lens? I have shot with my Canon quite frequently, however I want sharper and closer images. Perhaps all these suggestions will satisfy my desire for sharper images. I am so glad I found this forum! :-):-):-) Yes, I am aware of Bokeh. Thank you. However, I am not a big fan of it. I understand it is commonly used in portrait photography, but I do not like intensely blurred backgrounds. A touch of it is nice. Personal preference. It can be beautiful. I began shooting landscape photography, so I guess I like everything quite crisp because it is what I am mostly familiar with. Thank you. Truly helpful!

Best,
Jessica


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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?
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