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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 31 Dec 2014 (Wednesday) 22:26
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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?

 
EverydayGetaway
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Mar 23, 2015 10:40 |  #151

Frodge wrote in post #17487762 (external link)
I disagree completely. Learn to shoot manual first. Maybe I'm just old school. I learned to shoot on a Yashica FX-2000. This was a film camera, no chimping allowed. I think shooting av or tv is just going to confuse the issue because you are involving automation. I also disagree with you saying you would never use servo. But then in the next sentence you say to use it if the subject is moving.
My advice is to learn to use manual. Start I'm the house with a static subject in one shot mode, maybe even on a tripod. (Use one shot for objects that are not moving and si servo for subjects that are moving). Pick an aperture you want to use and a shutter speed and iso. If I'm shooting something indoors that is not moving. I would try to shoot at the lowest iso for the given aperture I wanted to use, and let the shutter speed fall where it may. This is if using a tripod. If not you need to use a reasonable shutter speed after setting aperture and let iso kind of fall where it may. It's a balancing act. But you more or less get to choose how you want to balance. You'll never understand what's going on if you flip it to av or tv, or even auto iso. Do you want to take snapshots or learn photography? This is a serious non-offensive question. If It's the former, disregard everything I wrote. If it's the latter, I would again, use M and go from there. Once you learn manual, you will fully understand the rest and can use automation along the way. Also, pick up a book on learning exposure.

I'm sorry, but this comes off as pretentious to me. Everyone is obviously going to have their own opinion, but saying that shooting in Av makes you learn to take nothing but snapshots is the most ridiculous load of malarkey I've heard in a while. How would removing one or two variables at a time while learning photography be more confusing? I really don't follow that logic. When you learn Math in school they don't drop you straight into algebra in first grade, first comes counting, addition, subtraction, etc. I unfortunately listened to "old school" people like you when I first started out and it slowed my learning process, once I ventured out to learn what the other modes did and how they worked and started using them it was a lot easier for me to understand what each setting was doing without losing potential good captures due to fideling with settings I didn't quite have the grasp on yet.

And for the Servo question, if memory serves right don't Canon's have 3 focus modes (single shot, Servo and AI servo)? I was pretty certain that AI Servo is the mode that automatically switches between single shot and Servo when it detects motion... that's the mode I was recommending not to use since in my experience it's less accurate than just choosing the focus mode based on the subject. I wasn't saying not to use Servo.


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rrblint
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Mar 23, 2015 11:10 |  #152

EverydayGetaway wrote in post #17488113 (external link)
...And for the Servo question, if memory serves right don't Canon's have 3 focus modes (single shot, Servo and AI servo)? I was pretty certain that AI Servo is the mode that automatically switches between single shot and Servo when it detects motion... that's the mode I was recommending not to use since in my experience it's less accurate than just choosing the focus mode based on the subject. I wasn't saying not to use Servo.

The focus mode that you are not recommending is called: AI Focus. The 3 modes are AI Focus, AI Servo, and One Shot.


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EverydayGetaway
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Mar 23, 2015 11:55 |  #153

rrblint wrote in post #17488165 (external link)
The focus mode that you are not recommending is called: AI Focus. The 3 modes are AI Focus, AI Servo, and One Shot.

Ah, I see, my mistake then. Well I still stand by what I said, just changing the names to AI Focus and what I thought was simply "Servo" to "AI Servo" ;)


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Frodge
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Mar 23, 2015 16:52 as a reply to  @ EverydayGetaway's post |  #154

Manual is the only way to really learn the triangle. I would make the argument that you really need to understand photography even more to use av and tv without first having a firm grasp on M. In those two modes, you pick either a shutter speed or aperture value and maybe an iso if it's not set to auto iso and either a random aperture or shutter speed will be picked depending what mode you are in. More complex really, if your not sure how the two play with each other. I am not saying to shoot 100% of the time in M, but you should learn in M.


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EverydayGetaway
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Mar 23, 2015 18:23 |  #155

Frodge wrote in post #17488712 (external link)
Manual is the only way to really learn the triangle. I would make the argument that you really need to understand photography even more to use av and tv without first having a firm grasp on M. In those two modes, you pick either a shutter speed or aperture value and maybe an iso if it's not set to auto iso and either a random aperture or shutter speed will be picked depending what mode you are in. More complex really, if your not sure how the two play with each other. I am not saying to shoot 100% of the time in M, but you should learn in M.

Again, what works for one person doesn't always (and often doesn't actually) work for another. M was overwhelming for me when I first started, thankfully my dad (who's been shooting professionally for longer than I've been alive) told me to try using Av for a while first and for me that made learning far easier, after a few weeks shooting Av I was comfortable enough to start using M without fear of missing all my shots.

As a coach I can tell you right now that there's no blanket solution for learning for everyone, if there were our education system wouldn't be in shambles.


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AirNikesNHats
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Mar 23, 2015 21:38 |  #156

M has been a bit of a challenge for me personally (I alternate between using an SL1 & T5, mostly landscape/NYC street scene, using 24,40,50 primes and a 55-250)

Im straight when using manually using Av & Tv, however going fully manual has proven to be a challenge, but I just keep at it. Everyone learns their way around differently. Trial, error, and lots of practice have been key for myself.




  
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Lbsimon
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Mar 23, 2015 22:26 |  #157

I got my first camera in 1963 when there was no automation, so I just had to learn in all manual mode. However, when my wife took up photography a couple of years ago with a Rebel, she found it easier to learn in Av, and later, when she firmly grasped the concept of the exposure triangle she switched to M. I think Av mode is the easiest and fastest way to get better understanding of exposure.


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jessiekins
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Mar 23, 2015 22:53 as a reply to  @ post 17487762 |  #158

Frodge:
I have been shooting static inside using manual mode. I have trouble with exposure. I kept getting underexposed shots. This was outside... So I have been shooting more "to the right" as people have told me. I always shoot low ISO because I hate that noisy grain. I've actually reached out to photographers in my area and they are very positive with helping me. I have an interview downtown tomorrow actually to be an assistant. I wouldn't be on this forum if I was just interested in taking "snapshots"


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jessiekins
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Mar 23, 2015 23:03 as a reply to  @ EverydayGetaway's post |  #159

I do find that learning in Manual mode is frustrating without guidance at the moment. I do like that EverydayGetaway suggested I learn in Av or Tv. But I do understand the importance of learning in manual mode.

- I think I get confused with shutter speed, so it's nice to kind of regroup when I go to an Av or Tv setting.
- I always start in manual, but I do think it's a good idea to kind of check in with the other modes and see what other results I can get.

I usually keep my ISO as low as possible, aperture f2.8-3ish, and shutter to 1/125-250. I try not to overcomplicate it for myself. I am shooting portraits, so I feel like this is fine. But it's just indoors, when I have to bump up my ISO, I run into exposure problems. And then I get confused. But I feel like I've been handling it better.


Jessica Rose

  
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jessiekins
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Mar 23, 2015 23:05 as a reply to  @ Lbsimon's post |  #160

Lbsimon: I completely agree! I shot in Av the other day and it felt very rewarding. It made me feel less overwhelmed for sure!


Jessica Rose

  
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Frodge
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Mar 24, 2015 01:13 |  #161

jessiekins wrote in post #17489252 (external link)
I usually keep my ISO as low as possible, aperture f2.8-3ish, and shutter to 1/125-250. I try not to overcomplicate it for myself. I am shooting portraits, so I feel like this is fine. But it's just indoors, when I have to bump up my ISO, I run into exposure problems. And then I get confused. But I feel like I've been handling it better.

This is why you're having trouble. You cannot always keep your aperture and shutter speeds at these values in all kinds of light. You need to understand when you need a high shutter speed, when te shutter speed doesn't really matter, when you need to shoot a wide aperture, when you need to shoot stopped down, and what iso is acceptable given these values. Others can disagree with me, but the reason it feels more rewarding to shoot in av, is that he camera is filling in the blanks. It's fine to use av as long as you understand, or begin to understand why the camera is choosing the values it is choosing in the circumstances you are shooting in. If you go back and read my posts, you wil see that I purposely said I was trying not to be offensive etc. I was only trying to help.


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Archibald
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Mar 24, 2015 03:20 |  #162

This is like learning to cook from 20 cooks.

:rolleyes:


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Mar 24, 2015 04:13 |  #163

"keep the ISO as low as you can to avoid noise"

This is a common bit of advice to new photographers - and its crippling advice.
You see whilst it is true that noise increases as ISO increases, it is also true that noise increases as underexposure in the photo increases. If you've come across the theory of "expose to the right" when reviewing the histogram (which it sounds like you have) then you are already partly aware that keeping noise down is about exposing as well as you can get get as much light data into the shot (ergo as much light); without, of course, overexposing the photo.

What is important to realise is that if you take two shots with the same aperture and same shutter speed but;

a) one with a lower ISO and underexposure (according to the histogram and expose to the right theory)

b) one with a higher ISO and a correct exposure (according to the histogram and expose to the right theory)

Then when you edit those photos if you have to increase the brightness/exposure on photo a then that photo will show more noise than photo b. Yes photo a has the lower ISO, but you've had to increase the light values and thus more noise has revealed itself in the shadowed/shaded/undere​xposed areas.
Meanwhile shot b, whilst at a higher ISO, has not had to have that light added and as such you will get reduced noise levels.

It's also true that sometimes aperture and shutter speed at at their limits; that is to say you can't make the aperture wider (smaller f number) nor make the shutter speed slower to let in more light. In that situation your only choice is to raise the ISO to get that proper exposure.

I would in all honestly consider putting "keep the ISO low" out of your mind for now. Yes it does give you a good starting point for your ISO until you get more of a feel for light and also what you're shooting as to what might be suitable (in my own example if its a dull day and I'm shooting action I might set the ISO to 800 before anything else because I know the light levels are low and I want a faster shutter speed for the action - similarly on a bright sunny day I might leave it at 100 to start with).


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apersson850
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Mar 24, 2015 06:04 |  #164

Image noise is easier to live with than motion/shake blur.


Anders

  
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saea501
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Mar 24, 2015 06:31 |  #165

Archibald wrote in post #17489433 (external link)
This is like learning to cook from 20 cooks.

:rolleyes:

Truer words were never spoken.

11 pages of opinions.

It's probably very difficult for the OP to glean the good from the bad.


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Is a Canon EOS Rebel T5 a good camera to begin with to use for professional photography?
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