Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Architecture, Real-Estate & Buildings Talk 
Thread started 21 Jan 2015 (Wednesday) 01:41
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Tilt-Shift theory

 
Benitoite
Goldmember
Avatar
4,569 posts
Gallery: 416 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 1826
Joined Jan 2015
Location: Morgan Hill, CA
     
Jan 21, 2015 01:41 |  #1

Ive read the pamphlet from canon about the TS lens, and understand it can help with shots that have an angular perspective. From reading the forum for a bit, I understand it's popular for shots of houses...
How do you know a shot would benefit from a TS lens? How do you know how much to tilt? When do you use the shift? What do the tilt and shift do optically that I can't do in post?
Thanks for any help you can give.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
xpfloyd
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
11,610 posts
Gallery: 465 photos
Best ofs: 7
Likes: 5989
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
     
Jan 21, 2015 02:19 |  #2

I don't use mine for buildings and architecture but to answer your questions the lens can be used for any shot where you have straight verticals. It allows you to properly frame the shot (by shifting) without taking the camera off level I.e. Pointing upwards to get the whole building in etc. this avoids perspective distortion.

Tilt is used to increase or decrease DOF. The amount you apply is different depending on the height of the camera. It's worked out in the field by trial and error but you start to get a feel for it after a while and can usually get quite close straight of the bat.

Things you can do with a tilt shift lens that you can't do in post -

Increase DOF beyond what you get by hyperfocal focussing
Set the plane of focus so that it's not square to the sensor
Take photos that stitch together effortlessly - sure you could correct distortion in all 3 photos then try and stitch but the lens makes this quick and easy
Selectively focussing using tilt

Also, on a tilt shift lens the image circle is bigger so on a non shifted shot you do not get the edge problems you get with a standard lens - vignetting, loss of sharpness etc - the lenses do exibit these things in the shifted positions though.

The canon tilt shift lenses as well as being very sharp are also great at handling flare ands CA

A couple of good resources are -


http://www.cambridgein​colour.com …ls/tilt-shift-lenses1.htm (external link)
http://www.cambridgein​colour.com …ls/tilt-shift-lenses2.htm (external link)

Im sure there's more I've not thought of just now but im sure someone else will chime in. If your serious about architecture photography tilt shift lenses is the way to go.


Eddie | flickr (external link)| gear
α7R III | 15 | 21 | 28 | 55 | 85

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Benitoite
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
4,569 posts
Gallery: 416 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 1826
Joined Jan 2015
Location: Morgan Hill, CA
Post edited over 3 years ago by Benitoite with reason 'typo'.
     
Jan 21, 2015 02:30 as a reply to  @ xpfloyd's post |  #3

Interesting about the seamless stitching... Is that because you don't have to move the camera, just tilt and/or shift to reframe?




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
xpfloyd
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
11,610 posts
Gallery: 465 photos
Best ofs: 7
Likes: 5989
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
     
Jan 21, 2015 02:35 |  #4

Correct. I believe parallax can be an issue with the 17mm TSE if you have detail close to the camera but it's not an issue I have ever encountered with the 24mm. There's ways around parallax though such as sliding the camera on the tripod mount and shifting one way and taking the shot, then sliding on the mount the same distance in the other dirextion and shifting the opposite way to get the shot. (That's the basics, you will find more technical info on that online)


Eddie | flickr (external link)| gear
α7R III | 15 | 21 | 28 | 55 | 85

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tareq
"I am very lazy, a normal consumer"
Avatar
17,764 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 301
Joined Jan 2006
Location: Ajman - UAE
     
Jan 21, 2015 05:43 |  #5

Tilt/shift lenses bacame addictive really, since i bought them i didn't touch my other lenses much except Samyang just for few tests, and because i lost many things lst year so i didn't do photography in general to justify using most of my lenses, so i narrowed to use TS for a while.

I do like that shift ability of the lens for stitching, once i did that i started to do more panos, i remember i did 3-4 panos only in the past with one of many lenses and i was scared to stitch and wait long and correct even if i use that RRS panoramic tools, but with TS, i do that without fair.

I still couldn't figure out about tilt function, i did test it, but on LCD or viewfinder i couldn't tell if i applied the tilt good enough, i tried with all degrees or say 1 degree for each frame, and i can only tell on computer monitor or if i zoom on LCD which i don't do much, so i hope i can find a better way to calculate the exact or best tilt degree to save my time rather than shoot many frames and pick the best one later.


Galleries:
http://hamrani.deviant​art.com/gallery/ (external link)
Gear List
Facebook (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
troutfisher
Goldmember
Avatar
1,659 posts
Gallery: 23 photos
Likes: 29
Joined Apr 2007
Location: West Yorkshire UK
     
Jan 21, 2015 06:49 |  #6

This might be of interest http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorial​s/focusing-ts.shtml (external link) in addition to the Cambridge info.
I must say I love my TS-E but it requires a lot of patience and a good tripod to use , particularly for the tilt function, you are not going to get a lot of shots in a short time
The biggest difficulty with tilt is getting the focus correct and I found that without live view and the zoom function it was difficult to say the least.
If you are interested in one hire before you buy, they are very specialised and not to everyones taste but like Tareq says they can become addictive


Chris
" Age and treachery will always defeat youth and enthusiasm"

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
xpfloyd
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
11,610 posts
Gallery: 465 photos
Best ofs: 7
Likes: 5989
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
     
Jan 21, 2015 06:52 |  #7

Agreed, live view and x10 zoom are essential for focus setting with tilt.

I think the fact the lens slows you down is what I like most about it when doing landscapes, it makes you stop and think and really work the shot


Eddie | flickr (external link)| gear
α7R III | 15 | 21 | 28 | 55 | 85

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
airfrogusmc
I'm a chimper. There I said it...
35,552 posts
Gallery: 127 photos
Best ofs: 6
Likes: 4198
Joined May 2007
Location: Oak Park, Illinois
     
Jan 21, 2015 07:40 |  #8

Want to slow down and really have control? Shoot architecture with one of these.
http://www.largeformat​photography.info …rff-8x10/deardorff012.jpg (external link)

You have tilt, shift, rise. fall on both the lens board and the film back giving you twice the perspective control you have with a T&S lens.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tareq
"I am very lazy, a normal consumer"
Avatar
17,764 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 301
Joined Jan 2006
Location: Ajman - UAE
     
Jan 21, 2015 15:26 |  #9

airfrogusmc wrote in post #17392735 (external link)
Want to slow down and really have control? Shoot architecture with one of these.
http://www.largeformat​photography.info …rff-8x10/deardorff012.jpg (external link)

You have tilt, shift, rise. fall on both the lens board and the film back giving you twice the perspective control you have with a T&S lens.

I agree, and almost i didn't know how to use that large format until i bought this TS lens, later when i will use LF again i will know how to use it better way, good i have one large format that has almost all movements except front shift which is not a big deal for me.


Galleries:
http://hamrani.deviant​art.com/gallery/ (external link)
Gear List
Facebook (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
phantelope
Goldmember
Avatar
1,889 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 39
Joined Sep 2008
Location: NorCal
     
Jan 21, 2015 16:00 |  #10

good info here, I just got the 24mm and have lots to learn.

And some day I'll get me a large format camera, some day...


40D, 5D3, a bunch of lenses and other things :cool:

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Alveric
Goldmember
Avatar
4,424 posts
Gallery: 31 photos
Likes: 943
Joined Jan 2011
Location: Canada
     
Jan 21, 2015 16:16 |  #11

You can get a Cambo Ultima 35 (external link).


'The success of the second-rate is deplorable in itself; but it is more deplorable in that it very often obscures the genuine masterpiece. If the crowd runs after the false, it must neglect the true.' —Arthur Machen
Why 'The Histogram' Sux (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
CameraFiend
Member
32 posts
Likes: 3
Joined Dec 2014
Post edited over 3 years ago by CameraFiend. (2 edits in all)
     
Jan 21, 2015 17:35 |  #12

The most beneficial use is to give your images a more realistic perspective by shifting down about 5 degrees.

Photos of interiors look kind of tunnel-like and unrealistic when taken with a non-tilt shift lens. You can lower the height of your tripod to get the same effect, but then the ground looks larger and you still don't have an awesome interior photo. You're effectively trying to remove much of the ceiling show without making the ground look large. The only way to do this is with a tilt-shift lens. You can't replicate it in Photoshop.

You also want straight lines, and you can replicate that in Photoshop, but sometimes photoshop over-distorts your corrected shot. The tilt-shift is the better way to get straight lines.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
CameraFiend
Member
32 posts
Likes: 3
Joined Dec 2014
Post edited over 3 years ago by CameraFiend.
     
Jan 21, 2015 17:42 |  #13

The reason you didn't notice much of an effect with the tilt function is because you own the 24mm tilt-shift. The depth of field is pretty deep on that lens to begin with. You'll notice tilt effects more with the 45mm and especially the 90mm tilt-shift lenses. Likewise, tilt effects are virtually non-existent on the 17mm tilt shift.

That's why. :-)

Tareq wrote in post #17392613 (external link)
Tilt/shift lenses bacame addictive really, since i bought them i didn't touch my other lenses much except Samyang just for few tests, and because i lost many things lst year so i didn't do photography in general to justify using most of my lenses, so i narrowed to use TS for a while.

I do like that shift ability of the lens for stitching, once i did that i started to do more panos, i remember i did 3-4 panos only in the past with one of many lenses and i was scared to stitch and wait long and correct even if i use that RRS panoramic tools, but with TS, i do that without fair.

I still couldn't figure out about tilt function, i did test it, but on LCD or viewfinder i couldn't tell if i applied the tilt good enough, i tried with all degrees or say 1 degree for each frame, and i can only tell on computer monitor or if i zoom on LCD which i don't do much, so i hope i can find a better way to calculate the exact or best tilt degree to save my time rather than shoot many frames and pick the best one later.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
airfrogusmc
I'm a chimper. There I said it...
35,552 posts
Gallery: 127 photos
Best ofs: 6
Likes: 4198
Joined May 2007
Location: Oak Park, Illinois
     
Jan 22, 2015 07:23 |  #14

Tareq wrote in post #17393430 (external link)
I agree, and almost i didn't know how to use that large format until i bought this TS lens, later when i will use LF again i will know how to use it better way, good i have one large format that has almost all movements except front shift which is not a big deal for me.

With a view camera you can keep the back parallel with the object like a box or a building helping keep that perspective correct. Those cameras just give you a lot more control by the back being able to move to.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
njstacker22
Senior Member
Avatar
703 posts
Gallery: 10 photos
Likes: 93
Joined Mar 2014
Location: Hamilton, NJ
     
Jan 23, 2015 14:08 |  #15

xpfloyd wrote in post #17392674 (external link)
Agreed, live view and x10 zoom are essential for focus setting with tilt.

I think the fact the lens slows you down is what I like most about it when doing landscapes, it makes you stop and think and really work the shot

The lens slowing me down is why I'm really scared of it. That and the fact that it's all manual focus. I shoot a lot of real-estate but most of my shoots are quick jobs (20 shots, 1 hr). There is no way I would be able to use this lens in my situation. If I moved into nicer listings ($700-800k+) I think it would be something to strongly consider. I shoot very nice listings now but I don't currently feel like it's enough to justify the money spent.

One day...


Sony A7ii [Sony FE 16-35mm f/4] [Sony FE 28-70mm] [Rokinon 135mm F2] [Sony 50mm 1.8]
https://www.flickr.com​/photos/djbigley/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

18,011 views & 10 likes for this thread
Tilt-Shift theory
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Architecture, Real-Estate & Buildings Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Lyndsy986
858 guests, 428 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.