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Thread started 23 Jan 2015 (Friday) 14:51
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D810 vs D750

 
werds
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Post edited over 4 years ago by werds. (2 edits in all)
     
Jan 23, 2015 14:51 |  #1

So, I sold all of my Canon APS-C gear and am now just waiting for a decent sale on a USA model for Nikon full frame... but in looking harder I ran across some things that sound interesting on paper but I am not sure if they translate into real life usage...

Although I plan on making a jump to full frame I realize there are certain instances a crop sensor is great (for example daylight when you want/need the added reach provided by the crop sensor... and yes I know it doesn't increase focal length it merely provides more pixels on target at a given field of view that gives it a closer appearance in framing and greater detail due to the pixels on target...)

Knowing this I thought I was going to purchase a D750 and then at some point swoop up a cheap D7100 to complement it (similar as to if I had a Canon System and Owned a 6D and a 7D to complement).

But when reading the manuals that I downloaded for the D7100, the D750, and D810 I was shocked to see that there was a crop mode in them! Now I realized though that with the D750 in crop mode I would lose any inherent benefit because the pixels on target in crop mode would be pretty small right? But what about with the D810? Wouldn't there still be a decent amount of pixels to work with in crop mode? Is the benefit enough to overtake the purchase of a D750/D7100 combo?

I know that the D750 would still focus better in lower light (-3ev vs -2ev)... has wifi... flip screen, and the Ui and U2.... but would it make more sense to just only use a D810 instead of having to maintain two separate bodies? Or is this one of those things that merely looks good on paper and in reality does not work so well? Granted with the D810 I would gain 1/8000 SS, 1/250 sync speed, a back button AF, and an ISO 64 (32) for long exposures... and the ginormous pixel count...

And the biggest reason this caught my eye was when I briefly googled the used prices on D810's they are similar to purchasing a new D750... so it makes the cost in dollars seem a wash to some degree...

Please feel free to shoot down my thoughts as I am honestly curious from the position of someone who does not own any Nikon kit yet and who would prefer not having to rent them in order to figure out these differences :P


Gear: Nikon D750, Nikon D7200, Sigma 17-50 2.8 OS, Sigma 50-150 2.8 OS HSM EX , Nikon 70-200 2.8 VR1, Tamron 24-70 2.8 VC, Tamron 70-200 2.8 VC, Tamron 28-300mm Di VC PZD, Tamron 16-300mm VC PZD, Tamron 150-600 VC, Nikon AF-S 50mm 1.8, Nikon SB-900
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Pagman
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Jan 23, 2015 15:38 |  #2

werds wrote in post #17396606 (external link)
So, I sold all of my Canon APS-C gear and am now just waiting for a decent sale on a USA model for Nikon full frame... but in looking harder I ran across some things that sound interesting on paper but I am not sure if they translate into real life usage...

Although I plan on making a jump to full frame I realize there are certain instances a crop sensor is great (for example daylight when you want/need the added reach provided by the crop sensor... and yes I know it doesn't increase focal length it merely provides more pixels on target at a given field of view that gives it a closer appearance in framing and greater detail due to the pixels on target...)

Knowing this I thought I was going to purchase a D750 and then at some point swoop up a cheap D7100 to complement it (similar as to if I had a Canon System and Owned a 6D and a 7D to complement).

But when reading the manuals that I downloaded for the D7100, the D750, and D810 I was shocked to see that there was a crop mode in them! Now I realized though that with the D750 in crop mode I would lose any inherent benefit because the pixels on target in crop mode would be pretty small right? But what about with the D810? Wouldn't there still be a decent amount of pixels to work with in crop mode? Is the benefit enough to overtake the purchase of a D750/D7100 combo?

I know that the D750 would still focus better in lower light (-3ev vs -2ev)... has wifi... flip screen, and the Ui and U2.... but would it make more sense to just only use a D810 instead of having to maintain two separate bodies? Or is this one of those things that merely looks good on paper and in reality does not work so well? Granted with the D810 I would gain 1/8000 SS, 1/250 sync speed, a back button AF, and an ISO 64 (32) for long exposures... and the ginormous pixel count...

And the biggest reason this caught my eye was when I briefly googled the used prices on D810's they are similar to purchasing a new D750... so it makes the cost in dollars seem a wash to some degree...

Please feel free to shoot down my thoughts as I am honestly curious from the position of someone who does not own any Nikon kit yet and who would prefer not having to rent them in order to figure out these differences :P


I have the D7100 and use it with my solitary 70-300VR, one of the things that attracted me towards this camera along with many others is the extra crop mode, as it is really useful for my aviation having 600mm on tap with just a slight drop in resolution, and still having 15.8 mp to crop from is great.
Also i believe the crop mode does not create any loss in IQ as it does not replace pixels with a digital replacements, it just trims off the excess from the 24mp original and downsizes to 15mp but using the crop.

Its all good for me as basically you could say i have a near 400mm lens on my d7100 now, when using the crop mode.

P.


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smythie
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Jan 23, 2015 16:49 |  #3

The D810 will crop down to around 16mp in its DX crop mode. A great body and if you could stretch it I reckon good enough to use as a sports body as well. There are a couple of guys with both the D750 and D810 (Nicksan and jdizzle that I know of). If they don't notice this thread, maybe try sending one of them a PM for comparative opinions


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JBlake
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Jan 23, 2015 22:04 |  #4

werds wrote in post #17396606 (external link)
But when reading the manuals that I downloaded for the D7100, the D750, and D810 I was shocked to see that there was a crop mode in them! Now I realized though that with the D750 in crop mode I would lose any inherent benefit because the pixels on target in crop mode would be pretty small right? But what about with the D810? Wouldn't there still be a decent amount of pixels to work with in crop mode? Is the benefit enough to overtake the purchase of a D750/D7100 combo?

In addition to the above mentioned benefits that the D810 has over the D750, it also has a much quieter shutter than the D750.

The D810 has two crop modes, 1.2x (25 MP), and 1.5x (15.3 MP). These two crop modes will also increase your buffer quite a bit as well. My D750's buffer increased from 14 at 1.0x, to 22 at 1.2x and 48 at 1.5x. The D7100 will put 24.1 MP on a subject at full 1.5x resolution while the D810 will put 15.3 MP on subject in 1.5x mode. Is 15.3 MP enough? If so, then pick up a D810.

Tough decision for sure.




  
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Pagman
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Jan 23, 2015 22:10 as a reply to  @ JBlake's post |  #5

Its an interesting choice between the two as they are both very good cameras, i think the crop modes are also extremely useful as i assume they are all loss less tele extenders and not digital convertors?

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Jan 23, 2015 22:22 |  #6

Pagman wrote in post #17397174 (external link)
Its an interesting choice between the two as they are both very good cameras, i think the crop modes are also extremely useful as i assume they are all loss less tele extenders and not digital convertors?

P.

I tested this out with my D750. Using a tripod, I shot my custom test chart at 1.0x (24MP) and then in 1.5x crop mode. I cropped the 24 MP image down to the 1.5x mode image and could not tell a difference at 100%. Even doing this with shadows to show noise, ISO 12,800 for that one test, and after cropping, the noise was identical between the two images. So the Nikons are literally cropping the image in camera.

The benefits are of course, greater buffer and more room on our SD cards. For me, I would rather crop/recompose to my liking with the full 24.1 MP image as opposed to use either of the crop modes.




  
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Jan 23, 2015 22:26 as a reply to  @ JBlake's post |  #7

Thats my thinking and hope with my d7100/70-300vr, to get a 15mp image @ 600mm eqv and still leave cropping room:-D


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JBlake
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Jan 23, 2015 22:34 |  #8

And one important thing to remember about these crop modes, when you look through the viewfinder, you still see the full 1.0x image. The D750 and the D810 superimpose a thin lined rectangle outline of the 1.2x and 1.5x modes on top of the full 1.0x image; makes it a little challenging to keep your fast moving subject inside of that 1.5x crop mode box. It would have been awesome if Nikon had made these two crop modes take up the entire viewfinder, that would have made it a lot easier to keep subjects inside of the desired crop frames boxes.

This is why I just picked up a D7100 to go along with my D750. It is easier to keep say wildlife framed up correctly inside of the D7100's viewfinder than using the 1.5x crop modes with either full frame camera.




  
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smythie
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Jan 23, 2015 23:48 |  #9

Yes, the crop modes are the same as using FX mode and cropping in post with the caveats about having to frame in the crop area in the viewfinder. Nikon first did the crop mode in their FX bodies so that you could use a DX lens and not have to worry about cropping the vignette out in post


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werds
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Jan 24, 2015 02:42 |  #10

Awesome information guys! Definitely answers the questions I had.


Gear: Nikon D750, Nikon D7200, Sigma 17-50 2.8 OS, Sigma 50-150 2.8 OS HSM EX , Nikon 70-200 2.8 VR1, Tamron 24-70 2.8 VC, Tamron 70-200 2.8 VC, Tamron 28-300mm Di VC PZD, Tamron 16-300mm VC PZD, Tamron 150-600 VC, Nikon AF-S 50mm 1.8, Nikon SB-900
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Jan 24, 2015 05:36 |  #11

I use crop mode all the time with my D810. I even remapped my DOF preview button to change crop modes. The biggest advantage to 1.5x crop mode is speed (with Nikon battery pack) and seemingly unlimited buffer. It doesn't put as many pixels on your subject like the D7100 but it will also keep firing in continuos high unlike the D7100 which does fill it's buffer quickly.




  
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werds
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Jan 25, 2015 22:31 |  #12

dgrPhotos wrote in post #17397487 (external link)
I use crop mode all the time with my D810. I even remapped my DOF preview button to change crop modes. The biggest advantage to 1.5x crop mode is speed (with Nikon battery pack) and seemingly unlimited buffer. It doesn't put as many pixels on your subject like the D7100 but it will also keep firing in continuos high unlike the D7100 which does fill it's buffer quickly.

wow that is actually a cool idea for remapping! Especially for me since my DoF preview is mostly in my head... I rarely ever used that button on my 70D (then again it was in an awkward spot to begin with...)


Gear: Nikon D750, Nikon D7200, Sigma 17-50 2.8 OS, Sigma 50-150 2.8 OS HSM EX , Nikon 70-200 2.8 VR1, Tamron 24-70 2.8 VC, Tamron 70-200 2.8 VC, Tamron 28-300mm Di VC PZD, Tamron 16-300mm VC PZD, Tamron 150-600 VC, Nikon AF-S 50mm 1.8, Nikon SB-900
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Jan 27, 2015 16:42 |  #13

How does the weather sealing compare between these two bodies?



Nikon D750, D7200 | Nikon-Nikkor 14-24G, 60G Micro, 70-300E | SIGMA 35A, 105 OS, 24-105 OS | ZEISS Distagon 2.0/25 Classic, Apo-Distagon 1.4/55 Otus, Apo-Planar 1.4/85 Otus, Makro-Planar 2/100 Classic, Apo-Sonnar 2/135 Classic

  
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Strobo
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Feb 10, 2015 12:40 |  #14

JBlake wrote in post #17397211 (external link)
And one important thing to remember about these crop modes, when you look through the viewfinder, you still see the full 1.0x image. The D750 and the D810 superimpose a thin lined rectangle outline of the 1.2x and 1.5x modes on top of the full 1.0x image; makes it a little challenging to keep your fast moving subject inside of that 1.5x crop mode box.

You can configure the camera to show a shaded area outside the crop instead a thin rectangle. To do this you need to select Off for AF point illumination (custom setting A6).




  
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Feb 12, 2015 20:42 |  #15

D750 and the rest for glass unless you need ultra resolution for landscapes and this is your bread and butter money.


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D810 vs D750
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