Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Macro 
Thread started 26 Feb 2006 (Sunday) 17:43
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Best way to hand-hold while shooting insects...

 
d'mur
Member
Avatar
168 posts
Joined Feb 2006
Location: Southern California
     
Feb 26, 2006 17:43 |  #1

My grasshopper just reappeared. He is no more than 1/4 inch long, but demonstrates to me just how tough this darn macro photography. So here is my issue.

I am using my 100mm macro lense with a couple of close-up filters attached so I can fill the frame with the little guy. However, my camera won't auto-focus with the second filter on, so I focus by moving the camera back and forth until my subject is in focus. However, between the slight shade, my hand-held camera and the mischieveous little breeze that seems to blow the second I'm ready to press the shutter, I can't quite get these pics as sharp as I would like. Any suggestions?

This picture is an example-I couldn't quite get his eyes in focus!

D


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


5D
17-40L
24-70L
100mm Macro
70-200 4.0L
Living proof that practice alone doesn't make perfect; sometimes you just need raw talent! :rolleyes:

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
d'mur
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Avatar
168 posts
Joined Feb 2006
Location: Southern California
     
Feb 26, 2006 17:47 |  #2

Is this any better?


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


5D
17-40L
24-70L
100mm Macro
70-200 4.0L
Living proof that practice alone doesn't make perfect; sometimes you just need raw talent! :rolleyes:

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Action_Man
Goldmember
Avatar
2,561 posts
Joined Jan 2006
Location: England, Nr Europe
     
Feb 26, 2006 17:59 |  #3

Brain (LordV) usually uses a pole to get stability, sometimes when i`m out and about i would pick up any old stick and use the same way Brian does, well attempt to anyway.

Nice images ...




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
racketman
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
21,601 posts
Gallery: 16 photos
Likes: 1700
Joined Oct 2005
Location: Richmond Surrey
     
Feb 26, 2006 18:06 |  #4

that will be a Bush Cricket rather than a Grasshopper as such-although they can be called long-horned grasshoppers. True Crickets are less grasshopper like and drab colours.


Toby
Canon 5D MKIV & 90D
Olympus EM-1 MKII
Flickr collections (external link)
Gear

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
d'mur
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Avatar
168 posts
Joined Feb 2006
Location: Southern California
     
Feb 26, 2006 18:19 |  #5

Racketman,

How does one tell the difference? I assume they are indiginous to So. Cal?

D


5D
17-40L
24-70L
100mm Macro
70-200 4.0L
Living proof that practice alone doesn't make perfect; sometimes you just need raw talent! :rolleyes:

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Leorooster
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,749 posts
Likes: 2
Joined May 2005
Location: New York
     
Feb 26, 2006 18:22 |  #6

You're doing the right thing. Moving back and forth until it's in focus and then press the shutter. It takes some practice to to able to shoot handheld. As mentioned, Brian (LordV) uses a bean pole, and he has some amazing results. Some people here use tripod when shooting macros and the results are very good as well, but I, for one, just can be bothered with the set up. I instead use a monopod, which IMO helps a lot.

And, I think Racketman is correct that it's a cricket rather than a hopper. Nice shots though :)


Canon 1DMarkIII :shock: | Canon 5DII :p | Fujifilm Finepix F30
Glasses & Goodies

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
dpastern
Cream of the Crop
13,765 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Ipswich, Queensland, Australia
     
Feb 26, 2006 20:16 |  #7
bannedPermanent ban

d'mur - I have exactly the same problem as you are having. I think it will come down a lot to how you hold the camera/lens, practice, more practice, and finding ways to make yourself more sturdy. Breathing techniques can help as well, apparently, you're meant to exhale as you depress the shutter button. Also, you're meant to gently roll your finger over the shutter button, rather than jerkily depressing it. Mirror lockup might help a bit as well...of course, failing that, use a tripod with something like a wimberley head (expensive, but apparently it's a very very good head).

Dave


http://www.macro-images.com/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
LordV
Macro Photo-Lord of the Year 2006
Avatar
61,504 posts
Gallery: 9 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 5770
Joined Oct 2005
Location: Worthing UK
     
Feb 27, 2006 01:04 |  #8

As mentioned above, I use a bean pole when shooting above 1:1 to help stabilise the camera (see pic below) but you really need a flash bracket for this to work as you grip the pole and flash bracket handle with your left hand. I use manual focus and the swaying technoique to focus and shoot whilst the camera is moving slightly- I find it very difficult to actually hold focus and shoot.
Other things that have helped are:-
1. Having a remote shutter button on the back of the flash bracket (by the left hand)- I found I was actually getting camera rotation when not using the pole when I pressed the shutter.
2. Using a monopod collapsed up and at right angles pointing back so you can rest it on your shoulder.
3. Taking many shots of the bug and trying to get different focus points- this is good practice and you normally find one of them will come out with the focus where you want it plus you may have the opportunity for focus stacking the shots.

Brian V

IMAGE: http://static.flickr.com/41/75900442_47fd4f3814.jpg

http://www.flickr.com/​photos/lordv/ (external link)
http://www.lordv.smugm​ug.com/ (external link)
Macro Hints and tips
Canon 600D, 40D, 5D mk2, 7D, Tamron 90mm macro, Sigma 105mm OS, Canon MPE-65,18-55 kit lens X2, canon 200mm F2.8 L, Tamron 28-70mm xrdi, Other assorted bits

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
chemicalbro
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,245 posts
Joined Jun 2005
Location: anywhere but here
     
Feb 27, 2006 02:28 |  #9

i usually stand with my legs about 2 feet apart for stability.... (use the swaying method of focusing,,, it's the tried and tested method) i put my right pinky under the body of the camera, index finger on the shutter (obviously) and the other 2 holding the grip (I suppose this depends on the size of your hands tho,,, I use a 350D which is small, so it's real easy for me to find a nice grip on it)...... i rest my pinky on the palm of my left hand (near the wrist) and hold the lens with my left fingers and pull my left arm in close to my chest (making your left arm a kinda monopod :)) don't tense your arm casue that will cause more shake than it solves..... relax,,,, move in out,,, when I get focus...FIRE...
i wouldn't recomend mirror lockup for handholding because you then have to press the shutter twice and on the 1st press it blacks out the viewfinder
As Brian also says, take LOTS of shots.... (my normal is about half a dozen per bug, one is bound to be in focus)
99.999999999999999 of my macro shots are handheld (like leo i can't be bothered with the tripod and i find that my monopod isn't versatile enough, it's easy enough to sway in and out but if you have to change the height of the pod by a few mm it's a different story, by the time you get the thing set up right your bug is long gone)

I just ordered a battery grip for it tho so i guess i'll have to modify my hand position (i really want the vertical shutter button tho and the extra battery life )


btw Brian , your cat is looking at you thinking (wtf is that crazy b***ard up to now, i wish he'd pay as much attention to me as he does to springtails ;))


Alan

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
LordV
Macro Photo-Lord of the Year 2006
Avatar
61,504 posts
Gallery: 9 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 5770
Joined Oct 2005
Location: Worthing UK
     
Feb 27, 2006 02:36 as a reply to  @ chemicalbro's post |  #10

Hi Alan, :) :)
The cat is quite funny now- if he sees me pick up the camera, he goes to the back door to wait to go out with me :)
Only problem with this is he does like chasing the larger bugs if they are low enough.
Brian V.


http://www.flickr.com/​photos/lordv/ (external link)
http://www.lordv.smugm​ug.com/ (external link)
Macro Hints and tips
Canon 600D, 40D, 5D mk2, 7D, Tamron 90mm macro, Sigma 105mm OS, Canon MPE-65,18-55 kit lens X2, canon 200mm F2.8 L, Tamron 28-70mm xrdi, Other assorted bits

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
chemicalbro
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,245 posts
Joined Jun 2005
Location: anywhere but here
     
Feb 27, 2006 02:42 |  #11

I just had an idea for a new kinda monopod for macro while i was thinking about how to adjust height.
I'm gonna go model it in a 3d prog.........i'll post a pic of my idea when i'm done (maybe somebody would make me one :))

EDIT...... in fact maybe I'll patent the idea b4 i post a pic ;)


Alan

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
dpastern
Cream of the Crop
13,765 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Ipswich, Queensland, Australia
     
Feb 27, 2006 03:06 |  #12
bannedPermanent ban

Brian, thanks for the tips, I shall have to try. Chemical, thanks for the tips as well, I think part of my problem is I've been holding onto the lens too tight, and shaking from the tension. Relax! I shall try this as well. The lots of shots is true as well, like anything, practice makes perfect. I fear I have a long way to go, but if I can get half as good as you guys, I'll be happy with myself :) I find shooting insects very relaxing and enjoyable.

Dave


http://www.macro-images.com/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Omri ­ Alon
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,228 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 34
Joined Nov 2005
Location: Israel
     
Feb 27, 2006 04:52 as a reply to  @ LordV's post |  #13

LordV wrote:
Hi Alan, :) :)
The cat is quite funny now- if he sees me pick up the camera, he goes to the back door to wait to go out with me :)
Only problem with this is he does like chasing the larger bugs if they are low enough.
Brian V.

My cat is kind of like yous :lol: :lol: Do you remember my toad pics? I had to put my cat inside to take those pics :D My cat also looks like yours. She makes a great model though :lol:

PHOTOBUCKET EMBEDDING IS DISABLED BY THIS MEMBER.
Photobucket sends ads instead of embedding photos from their free galleries.
Click the link (if available) below to see the image in a gallery page.

http://i22.photobucket​.com …20Choobee/CRW_8​862-01.jpg (external link)

Omri Alon | Flickr (external link)
Canon 6D
Samyang 14mm | 16-35L IS | Rokinon 24mm | 35mm IS | 85mm f/1.8 | 200mm f/2.8L | 430EXII

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
d'mur
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Avatar
168 posts
Joined Feb 2006
Location: Southern California
     
Feb 27, 2006 10:02 |  #14

Great tips, thanks, everyone! I'm thinking the monopod idea will work best for me, since I can collapse it and use it when I am shooting from a sitting position (which is most of the time. I need to plant some taller bug-attracters!).

I like the pet info, too. I can't imagine life without my dog, although I have had to edit hair out of pics, and I found one on my focus screen. Grrrr...


5D
17-40L
24-70L
100mm Macro
70-200 4.0L
Living proof that practice alone doesn't make perfect; sometimes you just need raw talent! :rolleyes:

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
pxl8
Goldmember
Avatar
1,106 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 68
Joined Jul 2005
Location: Somerset, UK
     
Feb 27, 2006 11:34 |  #15

I use a monopod for low level stuff and find it very easy to work with. I keep the length short and sit crossed legged on the ground, resting the monopod on my leg. If the subject is a bit higher rather than extend the monopod I often bend over a bit and rest against the top of my thigh. I put a ball head on top of the mono so I can adjust the angle of the camera compared to the angle of the monopod. I did get a tripod at Xmas but I've yet to do any real shooting with it - I've got some plans for hoverflies this summer where the tripod will be ideal.


-- PXL8
1DmkIV, 5DmkIII + 135mm f/2L, 24-70mm f/2.8L, Sigma 35mm f/1.4

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

7,086 views & 0 likes for this thread
Best way to hand-hold while shooting insects...
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Macro 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is abbeyroo
753 guests, 220 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.