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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 02 Jul 2015 (Thursday) 05:28
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How much parabolic are parabolic light modifiers ...

 
Ultrazauberer
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Aug 29, 2016 04:41 |  #76

I got a deep parabolic shaped silver reflective umbrella from China. It is 106cm big and 37cm deep. I tried to calculate the focal point and according to my tests it's between 19cm and 23cm. This modifier works well with speedlights (with diffusion caps on). Very efficient and light to travel. :-)


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nixland
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Aug 29, 2016 06:53 |  #77

Ultrazauberer wrote in post #18109951 (external link)
I got a deep parabolic shaped silver reflective umbrella from China. It is 106cm big and 37cm deep. I tried to calculate the focal point and according to my tests it's between 19cm and 23cm. This modifier works well with speedlights (with diffusion caps on). Very efficient and light to travel. :-)

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:) ... Good luck with your new modifier.




  
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Wilt
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Aug 29, 2016 08:56 |  #78

OK, I will admit to having out 'out of it' for too long...Can someone provide me with a succint statement of the PURPOSE of the parabolic light modifier? What is the goal of the photographer in using one?


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nixland
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Aug 29, 2016 09:25 as a reply to  @ Wilt's post |  #79

It will give you more options on lighting character (large focused hard light, and large ring light as the bonus) and can give you more light intensity if you need it (for example for mid day photoshoot).
You need a focusing rod to put the strobe backward along the axis.

So if you don't need those options, the para is a waste of money :)




  
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Wilt
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Aug 29, 2016 09:35 as a reply to  @ nixland's post |  #80

Thx. For 'hard light' I use a fresnel focusing light, but I absolutely detest the 'ring' look shadow surrounding the subject. I guess not for me.


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nixland
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Aug 29, 2016 10:55 |  #81

Wilt wrote in post #18110135 (external link)
Thx. For 'hard light' I use a fresnel focusing light, but I absolutely detest the 'ring' look shadow surrounding the subject. I guess not for me.

Well, if you need 70 inches diameter or more fresnel look light, for full body perhaps, para could be your option :)




  
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Aug 29, 2016 13:29 |  #82

Wilt wrote in post #18110135 (external link)
Thx. For 'hard light' I use a fresnel focusing light


A Fresnel lens gives a lot harder light, as does a mirror-polished parabolic spotlight. Even perfectly focused, these adjustable parabolic reflectors still have some degree of diffusion because the reflective surfaces are metallic fabric like the inside of a softbox or silver umbrella, not a mirror surface. What the parabolic reflector can do that the typical "movie light" type Fresnel cannot is provide a large-diameter source of parallel-ish rays. You'd need a lighthouse-sized Fresnel lens or larger to get a similar source, and it would be much harder-edged light.

Wilt wrote in post #18110135 (external link)
but I absolutely detest the 'ring' look shadow surrounding the subject. I guess not for me.

The de-focused parabolic does become a ring-shaped source of light, but it's very large in diameter, farther from the subject, and still somewhat directional. The look is nothing like what you get from a ring-flash or ring of lights. The end result is similar to the look of a big octabox with grid, but with harder shadows, more contrast. It's more like a big silver beauty dish than a ring light.

While it's not a "quick answer", the best example on the web is Karl Talyor's demo here: https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=8NrNpQlabnE (external link)


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nixland
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Aug 29, 2016 20:06 |  #83

nixland wrote in post #17956397 (external link)
The test results of "ring light" effects from Rime Lite 180.

Top : my earlier test with the strobe head at 65cm/25.5 inch from the base, about 6 feet distance between front edge of the para to model's face.
The base of the para (speedrings) base is about 6 feet high aimed down at the model.

It's not quite pleasing imho. Looks harsh. It seems that the angle of the para axis is not in best position that the light from lower area was stronger than the upper area. See the catchlight.

Mid :
I did the second test several weeks after the previous test.
This time the distance between the para and the model was a bit farther a couple of inches.
And the distance of the strobe is 60cm/23.5 inch and the base position is a bit higher.
The result is more pleasing.

Bottom :
The same as the prevoius setup but this time the axis is paralel to the ground; the base position is at the same height as the model's head.
How do it looks? :)
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The ring light effects




  
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nixland
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Sep 15, 2016 06:49 |  #84

My DIY focusing rod. Short rod for small para modifiers, and long rod for larger ones or for ring light effects


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nixland
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Sep 15, 2016 06:50 |  #85

For other strobe :)


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Sep 18, 2016 01:12 as a reply to  @ nixland's post |  #86

That looks great, nixland! This is the best DIY focusing rod I've seen.

Can you give us a parts list and any lessons learned, tricks or things to avoid?


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nixland
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Sep 18, 2016 08:52 |  #87

F2Bthere wrote in post #18131553 (external link)
That looks great, nixland! This is the best DIY focusing rod I've seen.

Can you give us a parts list and any lessons learned, tricks or things to avoid?

Thanks. It's my second version. The first version is very fragile (see my previous post).
Well, the design is combination of several focusing rod made by others.
The main design inspired from the one made by veteran member of this forum, Dave "tetrode".
The pivot grip and speedring mount disc inspired from Broncolor para.
The rod to put the strobe inspired by Fotodiox focusing rod.

Well, it's not fully DIY. I drew the design, bought the aluminum rod and plate and brought it to lathe workshop :)
I painted it myself though.




  
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Sep 25, 2016 00:21 |  #88

StarFish


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nixland
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Sep 25, 2016 05:40 |  #89

abbadon31 wrote in post #18139521 (external link)
StarFish
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Waiting for your video review Scott :)




  
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Nov 02, 2016 05:18 as a reply to  @ nixland's post |  #90

Thanks nixland. I forgot to post the images of the modifier with the speedlights in it. Sadly I haven't take a picture until now with exactly this configuration (= no diffusor). The days getting shorter and darker and the chances of using this umbrella are increasing. ;-)a


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How much parabolic are parabolic light modifiers ...
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