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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk 
Thread started 02 Aug 2015 (Sunday) 19:57
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IS and monopods

 
greyswan
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Aug 02, 2015 19:57 |  #1

Not sure if this is the right forum for this question, but I just bought a used 300 tele with IS (older lens which has to be manually turned off when using a tripod). Does turning off IS also apply to using a monopod? I'm assuming the mono still allows motion which needs to be corrected - is that assumption correct?


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MalVeauX
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Aug 02, 2015 20:06 |  #2

greyswan wrote in post #17654110 (external link)
Not sure if this is the right forum for this question, but I just bought a used 300 tele with IS (older lens which has to be manually turned off when using a tripod). Does turning off IS also apply to using a monopod? I'm assuming the mono still allows motion which needs to be corrected - is that assumption correct?

Heya,

Try it both ways, on and off. Also, depends on your shutter speed. I often shoot on a tripod even with IS (VC) on, but I'm shooting at a shutter of 1/1000s or faster, and I find IS very useful even though it's on a tripod simply to stabilize the view finder. Also, I use IS on a tripod even at shutters as low as 1/80s or 1/100s, even on a 600mm lens. So it really depends on the particular IS/VC/OS that you're using and the situation you're using it in.

With the 300 F4L IS, I'd use it both on and off and see what is best for what your needs are and see what works best at fast shutter speed, versus slow shutter speed.

Very best,


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ejenner
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Aug 02, 2015 22:34 |  #3

My general rule is if my hand is on the camera, IS is on. It is irrelevant what the camera is mounted on. Only on a tripod, hands-off (i.e. remote or timer) do I switch IS off, but of course that could also be balanced on a log, on a table or any other situation the camera is completely still.


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Aug 02, 2015 22:40 |  #4

Agree with above, IS on for Monopod use.

You'd need to be VERY steady for the IS to create issues. You will know if it does, at which point, turn it off.


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greyswan
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Post edited over 3 years ago by greyswan.
     
Aug 03, 2015 13:55 |  #5

Thanks for the help everyone - I will try both ways :) ).


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Aug 03, 2015 17:44 |  #6

If this is the Canon 300 F4 L IS then (having used one for quite a few years) I would turn the IS off and leave it there. IS is designed to help you get sharp shots when you cannot achieve sufficient shutter speeds and it is very good at it! However if the shutter speed is not an issue then you are better off without it regardless of how the lens is supported in my experience. Only use IS when your shutter speed is getting too low for your focal length and your subject is not moving.


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LV ­ Moose
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Aug 03, 2015 18:04 |  #7

Different strokes, I guess. I always use IS when hand-held or using a monopod, regardless of shutter speed (panning is the exception, and I don't do much of that), and regardless of the lens.


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Aug 04, 2015 18:04 as a reply to  @ LV Moose's post |  #8

Perhaps I am biased?
I have found that my AF locks faster and tracks better with IS turned off - since January 2014 I have not used IS on any IS lenses and am getting better results without it, regardless of the support used. Yes that does include my Canon 800mm hand held, in fact this is the lens that showed the greatest improvement with IS disabled.
It's all down to your own personal uses and as I shoot, mostly, wildlife IS is of no use as the shutter speeds required are faster than those where IS helps. For other uses IS may be handy - I just haven't found them yet.


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LV ­ Moose
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Aug 04, 2015 18:35 |  #9

^ Most of us ARE biased one way or the other ;)

Maybe my bias is due to shaky hands (tremors) which worsens as I age. IS stabilizes the image in the viewfinder for me, enabling me to focus on the precise point I want, even where high shutter speed negates any other advantage of stabilization. This is especially true for macro, which I do a lot of. (Yes, I know many who claim IS is worthless for macro, and I heartily disagree).

In ordinary shooting, the longer the lens, the more necessary IS becomes for me, even with a monopod. My 150-600 would be next to useless to me without it, except on a tripod.


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ejenner
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Aug 04, 2015 23:32 |  #10

Yea, I'm with Moose. I need IS just to be able to keep the AF point on the subject, even with a high SS. Even if the AF works better without IS, here is no point for me in it working better in acquiring the background.

I need an auto-tracking lens. Or maybe a lot more practice. Actually I know I need a lot more practice. Maybe when I can actually keep the AF point(s) on the subject I will try without IS.


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johnf3f
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Post edited over 3 years ago by johnf3f.
     
Aug 05, 2015 16:34 |  #11

Certainly IS does help to keep your subject more stable in the viewfinder - no doubt about that, try hand holding my 800mm and keeping it on target! But the slowing down of the AF acquisition and the impaired tracking more than outweigh that advantage for me - and I am none too steady either!
Give it a try, if you don't like your setup without IS then you can always turn it back on. My photography was hindered for a number of years due to my blind belief that IS/VR/OS helped get sharp shots, things are much better now.

All the best!


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Aug 17, 2015 22:30 |  #12

I'm another one who tends to leave IS On, especially with longer focal lengths.

Certainly it aids with handheld shooting, and also with a monopod. I have found that using it with a tripod can also be helpful, because as an earlier post noted, long focal lengths can show a lot of "jitter" through the viewfinder.

It should be noted, though, that especially with a tripod you want to keep the IS active (half-shutter pressed). If you lift off the shutter press, IS can de-activate over a few seconds, which can cause the lens/view to "droop". This can be quite distressing if you are shooting, say, moon shots (or other night views) where a close focus is critical at, say, 500-600 mms! In those scenarios I'm likely to turn the IS off on a tripod!


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IS and monopods
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