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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 03 Nov 2015 (Tuesday) 04:06
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Why Canon 600ex over Yongnuo 600ex?

 
arheo
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Nov 03, 2015 04:06 |  #1

I allways use canon speedlites. Now, i own two canon 430exii (and three 622c trigger).
But need more power.

My firs choice is canon 600exrt....but yongnuo is much cheaper.

What i need is the reason whay canon is better :D
is quality of light better, is measurin WB differn with non-canon flash (once i try yoongnuo 568 bonucing from the wall and its give me differnet color than my canon 430exII in the same situation),....

i use canon 6d.

thaks


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Nov 03, 2015 07:23 |  #2

I was an early adaptor to the Canon 600 EX-RT and ST-E3 system in the Spring of 2012 when they were first announced. At that time I needed to add another 580 EXII. With the built in Radio, I knew it was time to jump in. After a few weeks of realizing how spoiled I was with just one flash and transmitter, I knew having other nice flashes WITHOUT Radio was going to complicate the workflow. So I traded in the 430 and 580 for a second 600 EX-RT
A few years later we see the introduction of the Yongnuo Copy Cat system, right down to the graphics.
Sure it is cheaper. However in my business, having technical support and more importantly repair only a 75 minute drive from my house, it is not worth the additional savings that may ruin a days shoot.
So for me it is easier to stay with a tried and true system. That is just me.


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FarmerTed1971
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Nov 03, 2015 07:30 |  #3

Is it your hobby? Yongnuo
Is it your living? Canon


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Nov 03, 2015 07:32 |  #4

That being said... this is also my hobby and I chose Canon because I like the best. I bought my flashes used or as refurbs and paid between $300-400 for each of them. There are deals to be had if you're patient.


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agrandexpression
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Nov 03, 2015 08:37 |  #5

I'll give my very unscientific input...I have both the canon and the yongnuo. In my opinion, the color of the light is different...canon is a bit warmer, whereas the yongnuo is a bit cooler. In my opinion the difference isn't immense...but I'm sure others would tell you it's too different to use them together. Perhaps it might be worth it to gel the yongnuo, but I've never tried that up to this point.

That said, they do work together well. I've had no problems using them together (other than initially when I didn't know the operation of them and refuse to read the manual...because I am THAT guy). I really like the built in triggers...I was using the yongnuo 622 triggers before (which I did like, and had no issues with), but didn't like having to control the flash through the menu on the camera...i prefer making changes through the menu on the flash. I'm hoping the RT technology makes its way to other portable flash systems, it could really simplify an on-location shooter.




  
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MalVeauX
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Post edited over 5 years ago by MalVeauX.
     
Nov 03, 2015 08:50 |  #6

arheo wrote in post #17770401 (external link)
I allways use canon speedlites. Now, i own two canon 430exii (and three 622c trigger).
But need more power.

My firs choice is canon 600exrt....but yongnuo is much cheaper.

What i need is the reason whay canon is better :D
is quality of light better, is measurin WB differn with non-canon flash (once i try yoongnuo 568 bonucing from the wall and its give me differnet color than my canon 430exII in the same situation),....

i use canon 6d.

thaks

Heya,

I think it would help to know the amount of output you need, but make it relative to what you're actually doing with it.

As for Canon vs Yongnuo, frankly, they're equivalents in most ways. Yongnuo really has made excellent stuff, and since you can get a lot more of it for the cost, it's used by professionals all the same. I wouldn't worry about Canon vs Yongnuo, other than features and system and based on what you already have.

Even the highest power speedlite is just still a speedlite. Not that there's anything wrong with that. But you may find out that your application isn't suited to just one speedlite for the power needs you may have.

You may find that you just need 2 or 3 speedlites grouped up doing the same job from a modifier.
Or you may find that you need to simply move to a strobe and get way, way more power output for your money.

Example, and someone correct me if I'm incorrect, but 1 speedlite at full power, add one more speedlite next to it and gain about 1 stop of output, add a 3rd and you only gain less than a stop, with diminising returns. But the point is, with 2~3 speedlites, you can get more output which may be just enough to get what you're after. One "better" speedlite will not output more than 1 stop compared to another comparable speedlite. Certainly not worth the enormous price tag. In that case, you start looking at things like the AD360 and go strobe and get several stops more output over a speedlite for similar cost.

Again it comes down to what you're actually doing.

If you really prefer speedlites to strobes, I would suggest you explore simply having several speedlites for each "light source" instead of just having one speedlite per source. There's a lot of very successful strobists out there that to this for things like weddings and even motocross, so the application is basically universal.

Very best,


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Luckless
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Nov 03, 2015 09:16 |  #7

Having used Canon flashes and a number of Yongnuo flashes I personally find the high price of Canon gear a little hard to swallow and don't expect I'll buy any of their flashes in the future. I haven't gotten much time with the 600ex from either company yet, but it is tempting to swap my small flashes over to YN-600ex-rt.

While the service may be better with Canon, being able to have it quickly serviced and back to me in short order doesn't really help me when I'm somewhere trying to take photos at that moment. For the cost of a 3 light setup with Canon gear I can have nearly a dozen flashes on hand, meaning I can double up each light so I don't have to push them as hard and still have spares on hand if one does fail.

And pulling one flash out of service and replacing it with a spare is a whole lot faster and less disruptive to a day than having one die with no replacement.


Personally I'm rather a large fan of having both high powered strobes and small lights in your lighting arsenal. You don't always need 600w/s of power, nor can you always fit a light that large into where it needs to go for a scene. I'm actually trying to find something even smaller than my canon 430ex II that I can add into the kit for things like being able to hide it within a pose and direct a small burst of light into specific areas. (And I'm also thinking of building custom 2400 or 4800w/s units for lighting arenas.) Different tools for different jobs. So you really need to ask yourself what jobs you want to get into.


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absplastic
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Nov 03, 2015 16:25 |  #8

I went with genuine Canon units based on the reviews on Amazon and B&H from professional photographers. There are a few who note trying the Yongnuo in a setup with existing Canon units, and having the YNs go up in smoke under heavy use, while the Canon's kept on working.

The Yongnuo units have a lot of positive reviews. But the thing to keep in mind is that a lot of 4 and 5 star reviews are basically first impressions: people who got the units out of the box, took a dozen shots and thought "these are just like the Canon". Only a small percentage of people revisit and update their reviews if the product fails a month, 2 months, or a year later.

A lot of enthusiasts might not work their YNs hard enough for the difference to be known. I fall into the "semi pro" category--I do some paid gigs, but photography is not my primary source of income. I also do TF and test shoots with models where money is not on the line, but our time is, so failure of gear is no less acceptable. I do push the speedlites limits too, and regularly do outdoor shoots of >1000 shots over 2-3 hours, at spots I could not reasonably bring monolights to without an assistant. I have external Bolt AA packs on both my 600ex-rts, and I have worked them to the point of having them go into overheat mode (where wavy lines display over the icon of the flash head and the recycle times are SLOW) more than once. This is easy to do outdoors on a sunny day here in Cali. The flashes and battery packs are black, so they heat up quite a bit without even firing them, and they have no means to cool themselves other than time (time I don't usually have). It is under circumstances like this that pro photographers have reporting killing Yongnuo 600s. Perhaps their self-protection circuitry is not cautious enough? Given the huge price discrepancy, it would not surprise me if there were also a difference in the quality of internal components. I'd like to see these unit dissected.

In any case, reliability matters enough to me that I wanted at least my first 2 units to be genuine Canons. I could see adding YNs to my kit too, for times where I want some additional light sources.


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GregDunn
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Nov 05, 2015 01:38 |  #9

Of the three Yongnuo flashes I own, not one has ever failed to fire over several years and thousands of pops. I shot a tournament last year with one speedlight; over 1800 consecutive shots during the weekend with 100% reliability.

My three Yongnuo units add up to less than the price of one equivalent Canon unit. If one fails I can get a replacement quicker and for less money than getting a Canon repaired; in fact, I bought a spare to keep on hand at all times because they're so inexpensive. I don't even think "am I getting paid for this event?" when pulling the lights out of the bag. All I think is "can I depend on them?". The answer is "yes."

It's your money and your choice.


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MalVeauX
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Nov 05, 2015 02:37 |  #10

GregDunn wrote in post #17772900 (external link)
Of the three Yongnuo flashes I own, not one has ever failed to fire over several years and thousands of pops. I shot a tournament last year with one speedlight; over 1800 consecutive shots during the weekend with 100% reliability.

My three Yongnuo units add up to less than the price of one equivalent Canon unit. If one fails I can get a replacement quicker and for less money than getting a Canon repaired; in fact, I bought a spare to keep on hand at all times because they're so inexpensive. I don't even think "am I getting paid for this event?" when pulling the lights out of the bag. All I think is "can I depend on them?". The answer is "yes."

It's your money and your choice.

Same here, I have 6 Yongnuo flashes (560III x 4, 565EX x 2). No failures. No mis-fires. Great flashes. I got the 4x 560III's for $200 total. One transceiver for all of them. The 565EX's were like $60~70. I bought virtually all of them used too.

Very best,


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Post edited over 5 years ago by agv8or. (4 edits in all)
     
Nov 05, 2015 11:08 |  #11

I currently have both the Canon and Yongnuo versions of the 600EX-RT. So I have compared, scrutinized, and tried to justify a preference for one over the other and here is what I have concluded. There is a reason that Canons cost more than the Yongnuos and that becomes readily apparent when you actually use both of them side by side. Does the cost difference signify just how much better the Canon is over the Yongnuo? My answer is No! Would I go with a Yongnuo only setup? Maybe if money was the only issue but I really like the Canon 600EX-RT for it's build quality, consistencies and features not found in the Yongnuo version. Yes there are feature differences that just drive me crazy but may not be an issue to someone else. I have listed some below (1-8).

At $120, 1/4 the price of the Canon, the Yongnuo 600EX is a throw away flash in my opinion. Not worth my time and expense to send off to Timbuktu for repair when you consider that for $120 and a 2 day down time (Amazon Prime) I can have a replacement. That is more than likely cheaper and quicker than I can get a Canon 600EX-RT repaired. At that price you can have spares (plural). I am all about spares, one of my compulsive behavioral issues.

I think it has been proven that third party flashes are getting better and offer a very competitive alternative to originals, but cost is not everything. I can't prove it but Canon flashes just seem to be more consistent in flash output, color consistency, ETTL exposure consistency , and consistency between each flash independently. First off they were designed and built to work with each other as well as Canon Cameras in a system that was designed for them. The extra cost of the Canons no doubt comes partly from better quality internal components and better quality control overall which could explain the better overall consistencies from the Canon's when compared to third party flashes. Third party flashes also suffer from reverse engineering issues. There is a reason that most third party flash and radio triggers have a way to upgrade firmware.

If a person does decide to go with a third party flash, it is important that you buy from a company that is reputable and where you can exchange or return the flash easily and cheaply (conveniently). The key to third party flashes is getting a good one from the start as most of the issues, I have read about in forums, were readily apparent upon the first inspection or usage of the flash.

Feature differences between the Canon and Yongnuo versions of the 600EX-RT that are readily apparent to me as I have used both side by side.

1. The Canon flash head tilts and pivots more smoothly than the Yongnuo and locks in the straight forward position. The locking part not the best for bouncing flash but when used in certain situations with certain modifiers it may be an asset (such as "off camera" when a heavy modifier is mounted directly on the flash head). When bouncing flash the smoothness of tilting and pivoting the Canon flash head is much nicer than the Yongnuo which feels stiff and gritty to me.

2. When in Auto Zoom the Canon flash head zooms to 50mm (full frame sensor) when tilted or swiveled to bounce flash where as the Yongnuo will continue to zoom as the focal length changes. If you use Manual Zoom, which I do, then this may not be an issue but it is worth mentioning.

3. The Yongnuo does not have External Metering (Auto flash) but here again not a big issue as most do not ever use this feature (anymore) and probably some that do not even know what this feature is.

4. Not able to remove all the configuration pages, that I do not use, in the Cf. I just want to scroll through 3 pages (Wireless Off, Wireless RT Master and Wireless RT Slave) like I do with the Canon. The least I can narrow it down to in the Yongnuo is these three plus 1 page of the Wireless Optical Slave. Probably not a big deal but to me is annoying and confusing when you are used to the Canon. While we are on Wireless Flash configuration pages there are some pluses and minus for the Yongnuo other than just this one I have mentioned. (see 5 and 6)

5. The Yongnuo does not have Wireless Optical Master capability. Not a big deal if you only use the Wireless RT system but for some crossing over from non RT Speedlites it may be an issue.

6. Since we are on the subject of Wireless configuration pages there are three that you may find in the plus column for the Yongnuo over the Canon but more than likely will never use them. They are Wireless Optical Nikon iTTL Slave and "optical slave" modes (little "o" and little "s") S1 and S2. The S1 and S2 configurations apply to a built in optical slave that will trigger the flash in Manual mode when it see's a flash from another strobe. In the S2 configuration ignores the preflash from an ETTL strobe.

7. There are some Custom function and Personal preference items that are different between the two flashes.

8. Last but definitely not least although very confusing to me. One thing that I find as a "reserved plus" for the Yongnuo over the Canon is the ability to use the Wireless <Gr> mode, with older DSLR cameras, when using the Yongnuo as a Master in the Wireless RT system. I say a "reserved plus" because you can only use the <Gr> mode, with the older DSLR's, in the Manual mode. Yes you heard me right you can use the <Gr> mode with older DSLR's but the groups are only usable in Manual mode and if you try to set ETTL as one of the Group modes it will switch to Manual mode as soon as you press the shutter button.

This is both confusing and disappointing to me because I have really enjoyed using the Yongnuo YN-E3-RT's over my ST-E3-RT's because they allow older DSLR's to use the <Gr> mode just as if you were using an ST-E3-RT with a newer DSLR. All modes are available and usable with the Yongnuo YN-E3-RT with older DSLR's. The <Gr> mode does allow for the ETTL mode to be set and used by a newer DSLR just not an older DSLR when using the YN600EX-RT as a Master. One more thing to mention about the <Gr> mode with the Yongnuo 600EX-RT is that the Ext A mode is not available more than likely dut to the fact that External metering is not a feature of the flash. Probably not a big deal once again because most would either never use it or even know what it is.

I guess my summary of the last paragraph is that if you are using the YN-E3-RT with older DSLR's in the Wireless <Gr> mode just be aware that you will not fully enjoy the same features when using the Yongnuo YN600EX-RT. Basically using an older DSLR with the YN600EX-RT as a Master in the Wireless <Gr> mode is the same as using the Wireless Manual mode but expanding it from 3 Groups to 5 Groups. While we are on the differences between the YN600EX-RT and YN-E3-RT there is no "rear curtain" wireless capability when using the YN600EX-RT as a Master. Just thought I would throw that in here last to brighten your day although the Canon 600EX-RT does not have this feature either.

EDIT: One thing I wanted to add since I have been reminded about it while testing the both the Canon and Yongnuo 600EX's in the hot shoe of the Godox X1, and switching them back and forth regularly. The YN600 is loose in the hot shoe and does not tighten down when you move the lever lock to the lock position (this is the same for all my YN600's). The Canon 600EX tightens in the hot shoe as you move the lever lock to the locked position and it is much tighter in the hot shoe. This has not been an issue as far as connection and communication is concerned but the YN600 does rock back and forth more than the Canon.

Those who mentioned the auto focus assist and the weather sealing, good ones. I totally forgot about those differences but since I have never have, nor will I ever use the YN600 "on camera" I do not pay much attention to those differences but they are important for someone who will.


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WillMass
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Nov 05, 2015 15:58 |  #12

I have three Canon 600ex rt's and one YN-E3-RT. While I can't address build quality of the YN 600s, I can tell you that 2 years ago one of my 600ex's fell into a waterfall and was underwater less than a minute (seemed like an eternity), but it still works fine. Last weekend another fell about 4' onto concrete and aside from some chips and scrapes, it seems fine as well.


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Nov 05, 2015 16:06 |  #13

WillMass wrote in post #17773561 (external link)
I have three Canon 600ex rt's and one YN-E3-RT. While I can't address build quality of the YN 600s, I can tell you that 2 years ago one of my 600ex's fell into a waterfall and was underwater less than a minute (seemed like an eternity), but it still works fine. Last weekend another fell about 4' onto concrete and aside from some chips and scrapes, it seems fine as well.

Canon 600ex-rt are weather sealed. Open the battery hatch and you will notice the rubber gasket. Yongnuo 600ex-rt do not have this, AFAIK.


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Nov 07, 2015 06:31 |  #14

FarmerTed1971 wrote in post #17770530 (external link)
Is it your hobby? Yongnuo
Is it your living? Canon

+1


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Nov 07, 2015 07:10 |  #15

My friend was using a Canon 600EX and then decided to trade it in for two Yongnuo 600EXs. One of the Yongnuos stopped working shortly afterwards. I then decided that I should keep my Canons.




  
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Why Canon 600ex over Yongnuo 600ex?
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